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1 – 10 of 11

Abstract

Purpose

Using risk-related data often require a significant amount of upfront work to collect, extract and transform data. In addition, the lack of a consistent data structure hinders the development of tools that can be used with more than one set of data. The purpose of this paper is to report on an effort to solve these problems through the development of extensible, internally consistent schemas for risk-related data.

Design/methodology/approach

The consortia coordinated their efforts so the hazard, exposure and vulnerability schemas are compatible. Hazard data can be provided as either event footprints or stochastic catalogs. Exposure classes include buildings, infrastructure, agriculture, livestock, forestry and socio-economic data. The vulnerability component includes fragility and vulnerability functions and indicators for physical and social vulnerability. The schemas also provide the ability to define uncertainties and allow the scoring of vulnerability data for relevance and quality.

Findings

As a proof of concept, the schemas were populated with data for Tanzania and with exposure data for several other countries.

Research limitations/implications

The data schema and data exploration tool are open source and, if widely accepted, could become widely used by practitioners.

Practical implications

A single set of hazard, exposure and vulnerability schemas will not fit all purposes. Tools will be needed to transform the data into other formats.

Originality/value

This paper describes extensible, internally consistent, multi-hazard, exposure and vulnerability schemas that can be used to store disaster risk-related data and a data exploration tool that promotes data discovery and use.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Marco Pagani and Howard F. Turetsky

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the problems faced by Accounting and Finance (A&F) Departments concerning the hiring and retention of tenure/tenure‐track faculty…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the problems faced by Accounting and Finance (A&F) Departments concerning the hiring and retention of tenure/tenure‐track faculty members.

Design/methodology/approach

Analytic research.

Findings

Due to the rigorous Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business standards for “academically qualified” classification, increasing enrollment for A&F majors, and demographic trends of faculty members, it is becoming very challenging to hire and retain high‐quality academicians. This challenge is especially dire for public institutions of higher learning that are facing budget cuts and possible steep salary inversion. As an example, the average salary of US faculty members are compared to the salaries allowed under the California State University (CSU) collective bargaining agreement. The paper analytically argues that unless CSU A&F faculty members' salaries are allowed to reflect market conditions, severe negative externalities will impact the educational sector and A&F professionals.

Originality/value

Alumni, the A&F professionals, university administrators and other stakeholders must be made aware of the “perfect storm” on the horizon and the severe consequences that loom in its wake. It will take the collective “wisdom” to provide the necessary strength to resolve these critical issues. Hopefully, the distress siren will not only be heard, but listened to and addressed in a timely manner, so that rather solemn consequences can be avoided. The needs of the college communities at large should not be thwarted by existing inappropriate funding mechanisms.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Kenneth Leong, Marco Pagani and Janis K. Zaima

Past studies have shown that investment strategy using two popular metrics, the earnings‐price ratio (EP) and book‐to‐market ratio (BM) enable investors to reap abnormal…

Abstract

Purpose

Past studies have shown that investment strategy using two popular metrics, the earnings‐price ratio (EP) and book‐to‐market ratio (BM) enable investors to reap abnormal returns. More recent development of another ratio, economic value‐added‐to‐market value (EVAM) can be seen as a hybrid of EP and BM ratios. The purpose of this study is to examine whether portfolios created by utilizing the EVAM ratio will generate higher returns than portfolios formed with EP or BM ratios.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing the EVA data obtained from Stern Stewart & Co. and financial data from COMPUSTAT and center for research in security prices (CRSP), portfolios are created following the Fama and French portfolio formation methodology. The authors form separate portfolios using EP, BM or EVAM ratios where firms are ranked by a ratio in year t, then split into deciles. Then portfolios are constructed in year t + 1 for each decile and equally weighted portfolio returns are calculated. The cumulative ten‐year returns are compared between portfolios formed with EP, BM and EVAM ratios.

Findings

There are three interesting findings. One, the EP portfolios depict results that have long been documented. That is, value stock (low price‐to‐earnings ratio firms) and growth stocks (high price‐to‐earnings ratio) exhibit the highest returns. Two, the ten BM portfolio performances are not statistically different. Three, the EVAM ratios indicate that the negative EVAM (lowest decile) portfolio exhibit the highest return and the second highest return is generated by the highest EVAM portfolio. The general results of the thirty portfolios show that the highest EVAM ratio (EVAM10) performs the best. However, the pairwise mean differences between EP, BM and EVAM portfolios do not show statistical differences over the 1995–2004 period.

Originality/value

Although investment strategies using EP ratio and BM ratio have been thoroughly studied, investment strategy using EVAM ratio has not. Given that it has been documented that EVA is a better conceptual measure of value, portfolio managers or investors would be interested to know whether utilizing EVA for investment strategy would earn a higher return than strategies that use EP or BM ratios.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Marco Pagani, Matteo Vittuari and Luca Falasconi

Packed salads are popular in many countries of the world. The purpose of this paper is to assess the energy footprint of these products from farm gate to retail gate…

Abstract

Purpose

Packed salads are popular in many countries of the world. The purpose of this paper is to assess the energy footprint of these products from farm gate to retail gate, compared with unpacked produces distributed by retailers and farmers’ markets in Italy.

Design/methodology/approach

Life cycle assessment served as methodological background, even if the analysis was focused on direct and indirect energy consumption. Three supply chains were analysed: packed (P-S) and unpacked (U-S) sold in supermarkets, and unpacked produce sold locally (U-L). Energy inputs were accounted for processing, packaging, refrigeration, transport, and distribution. Data were collected from available literature and from interviews with key experts in the transformation, packaging, and retail sectors. Energy inputs were computed for 1 kg of finished edible product (kgp).

Findings

Packed salads require an elevated energy input ranging from 16 to 37 MJ kgp−1. Input energy is mostly required for packaging and refrigeration. By comparison, the U-L chain requires about one tenth of the energy (1.8-2.6 MJ.kgp−1), but local sold produces attain the best performance with only 0.6-1.2 MJ.kgp−1, since they do not need processing, refrigeration, and disposable packages. Packed products mainly rely on the availability of cheap fossil fuels and all the sector has significantly suffered after the oil shock of 2008. Increasing energy costs may lead the price of the commodity out of the market.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the subject of energy consumption in a popular sector of processed food to which at present little attention has been paid in the domain of food research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2020

Fernando G. Alberti and Federica Belfanti

This paper aims to contribute to the debate about creating shared value (CSV) and clusters, by shedding light on how clusters might generate shared value, i.e. cause…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the debate about creating shared value (CSV) and clusters, by shedding light on how clusters might generate shared value, i.e. cause social and business benefits, hence focusing on the following research question “do clusters create shared value?”

Design/methodology/approach

The study relied on social network analysis methods and techniques. Data have been collected from both primary and secondary sources, in the empirical context of the Motor Valley cluster in Emilia-Romagna. The authors computed three independent and four dependent variables to operationalize the concept of cluster development and shared value creation. A multiple regression quadratic assignment procedure and, more specifically, the most accurate model of that procedure, that is the double semi-partialling method, has been carried out to answer the research question. Finally, empirical evidence has been complemented with other cluster-level data recently collected by the Italian Cluster Mapping project.

Findings

The findings confirm how the development of the Motor Valley cluster in Emilia-Romagna contributed to the creation of economic and social growth opportunities for all the actors. The study shows that clusters do create shared value and the chosen cluster development variables do explain much of the business and social impact variables at a very high statistical significance level.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the under-explored research on clusters and CSV with a very first attempt in providing quantitative evidence of the phenomenon.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Raife Meltem Yetkin Özbük, Duygu Aydin Ünal and Büşra Oktay

There have been significant developments in the field of retailing with digitalization. One of these developments is the emergence of omnichannel retailing. Although this…

Abstract

There have been significant developments in the field of retailing with digitalization. One of these developments is the emergence of omnichannel retailing. Although this has affected both firms and consumers considerably, the literature is dominated by the studies dealing with omnichannel retailing from the firms’ perspectives. The studies dealing with omnichannel retailing from the consumers’ perspectives have recently begun to attract the attention of researchers. For this reason, this study conducted a literature review to examine various consumer behaviors mentioned in the studies aimed at explaining consumer behaviors in the omnichannel retailing context. The distribution of these studies according to years and journals, research methods used, theories adopted, and the related five-stage consumer decision-making stages are summarized. Additionally, this review addresses future research avenues.

Details

Managing Customer Experiences in an Omnichannel World: Melody of Online and Offline Environments in the Customer Journey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-389-2

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Marco Setti, Luca Falasconi, Andrea Segrè, Ilaria Cusano and Matteo Vittuari

– The purpose of this paper is to provide insights on the relationships between consumers’ income and household food waste behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights on the relationships between consumers’ income and household food waste behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Attitude toward food waste is a paradigmatic (economic) non-standard decision making. Based on behavioral economics concepts and empirical evidences, the study analyzes the frequency of household food waste and its main drivers with a focus on individual income. Through a panel of 1,403 Italian consumers, food waste behavior and its determinants are modeled for five food typologies using proportional odds models that adopt stepwise procedures and genetic algorithms.

Findings

Results suggest the existence of complex relationships between per capita income and household food waste behavior. When considering food typologies that include high value added products, this relation can be explained by an inverse U-shaped curve: mid-to-low income consumers purchase higher amounts of lower quality products and waste more food.

Research limitations/implications

The research highlights the importance of understanding the main socio-economic and behavioral determinants of household food waste, and the need for further researches.

Practical implications

The research motivates specific pricing, commercial and policy strategies as well as organizational technological, and educational solutions to prevent/reduce household food waste.

Social implications

Lower income class consumers show a greater attitude to waste certain food typologies. In turn, this implies that food waste can further worse economic inequality and relative poverty.

Originality/value

The study identifies different patterns of relationship among individual income and consumers’ food waste behavior, and describes the conditions that limit a household “Food Waste Kuznets Curve.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Sheila Serafim Da Silva, Paulo Roberto Feldmann, Renata Giovinazzo Spers and Martha Delphino Bambini

Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (Embrapa, the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation), owned by the Brazilian Government, is one of the most efficient…

Abstract

Purpose

Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (Embrapa, the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation), owned by the Brazilian Government, is one of the most efficient agencies for promoting sustainable tropical agriculture in the world. However, although information is available, farmers do not always put the technologies and knowledge into practice. There is a large difference between the average productivity of farmers and crop or herd potential. Thus, this paper aims to describe and analyze the process of technology transfer of the Embrapa Agrobiology Unit.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reviewed the classical and diffusionist models of technology transfer (TT) in Brazilian agriculture and the role of the government in innovation. This was based on documentary research and structured interviews with four employees, supported by a structured roadmap composed of four categories for analysis: the role of TT; the organizational structure of the area; the TT strategies; and the ways of delivery, methods and tools of TT. By a qualitative approach, the results were treated through content analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that the area of TT at Embrapa went through a recent restructuring, which included the interchange and collective construction of knowledge (ICC) in its TT process, to turn entrepreneurship into reality. The company is dedicated to bringing knowledge to the most important people: farmers. This has been done through a participatory TT model, which has involved multiplier agents from the research stage to the transfer stage.

Research limitations/implications

Some limitations were found, among them, the fact that only internal members of Embrapa were interviewed, limiting the view of the TTICC staff and without knowing the multiplier agents’ opinion and other actors involved in the process. In addition, it is a qualitative research that is subject to the interpretation of the researcher.

Practical implications

This study contributed to reflections about the TT process and how it can be used by different actors, along with the role of the State in innovation.

Social implications

In addition to contributing to the development of products, processes and technologies for the economic, social and environmental development of Brazil, Embrapa has been outstanding in generating knowledge for the advancement of science. Its results have had impacts not only nationally but also worldwide. Embrapa has played a key role in Brazilian agriculture as well as in livestock, mainly, in supporting governmental projects and in the implementation of public policies.

Originality/value

The aim of this study was achieved, as there was a possibility of describing and analyzing the technology transfer process at Embrapa Agrobiology Unit, located in the city of Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro. It is concluded that Embrapa has been committed to involving the farmer in the process of interchange, collective construction of knowledge and technology transfer. The farmer has become the focus of this process, reducing the development of “shelf” researches and increasing the participation of the farmer or of the multiplier agent. The importance of studying and knowing the process of technology and knowledge transfer to the public of interest should be highlighted, and especially the reasons why this technology or knowledge are often not adopted by the public. It was possible to identify that Embrapa has noticed the difficulties of farmers and realized that the best way the best way of transforming technological solutions and knowledge into innovation is by involving the farmer in the process of construction and of transfer. Thus, the farmer gives greater credibility to the technology or generated knowledge because this is something that he himself helped build. In the sphere of contemporary institutional knowledge management, Embrapa has had as its main point of departure the demand and the needs of society. For this, it has created means to ensure the participation of different actors because they signal the construction of technological solutions and of innovation and they are the ones who know the real situation. However, this is a recent progress within Embrapa that has evolved and generated results. Thus, research, science and technology institutions must go beyond technology transfer and must ensure the involvement, participation and interaction of the public of interest to promote significant change, social, economic and environmental development and transformation. Embrapa observed this from the referential framework that included technology transfer, interchange and the collective construction of knowledge.

Details

Innovation & Management Review, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-8961

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Marc Fetscherin, Ricardo Roseira Cayolla, Francisco Guzmán and Cleopatra Veloutsou

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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