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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Antonella Ardizzone, Valeria Faralla and Marco Novarese

Over the past several decades, studies regarding consumer satisfaction for organic food (OF) have increased along with the rise in OF consumption. However, empirical research into…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past several decades, studies regarding consumer satisfaction for organic food (OF) have increased along with the rise in OF consumption. However, empirical research into satisfaction for organic products with respect to conventional goods is still needed. Along this line, the purpose of this paper is to understand the role of information in children’s satisfaction for organic and conventional fruit nectar.

Design/methodology/approach

A satisfaction questionnaire on 92 primary school pupils was collected during the tasting stages. A questionnaire surveying the participants’ habits with respect to OF and fruit nectar consumption was also administered. Descriptive analysis and ordinal logistic regressions were used to investigate any correlation between the participants’ evaluations of fruit nectar samples and the other variables investigated.

Findings

According to the results of this paper, children’s satisfaction scores are influenced by the information they learn regarding fruit nectar: satisfaction scores are higher when children know the fruit nectar is organic. Satisfaction is also influenced by age: older children are more likely to assign lower scores to fruit nectars. Also, the effect of information regarding the nature of fruit nectar (organic or conventional) on satisfaction scores is stronger in children whose families consume OF.

Research limitations/implications

Due to financial constraints, this research was conducted on a non-probability convenience sample and on a single food product (i.e. fruit nectar).

Practical implications

Regulatory policies should consider these influences when legislating on product labelling and the disclosure of product information. Consumer evaluations can be indeed influenced toward responsible, safe behaviour.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the investigation of the connection between product labelling and children’s food satisfaction. Particularly, this study has generated some important findings in the field of children’s perceptions of OF.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Marco Novarese and Christian Zimmermann

This paper seeks to study how the democratization of the diffusion of research through the internet could have helped non‐traditional fields of research.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to study how the democratization of the diffusion of research through the internet could have helped non‐traditional fields of research.

Design/methodology/approach

The specific case the authors approach is heterodox economics as its pre‐prints are disseminated through NEP, the e‐mail alert service of RePEc.

Findings

Comparing heterodox and mainstream papers, the authors find that the heterodox are quite systematically more downloaded, and particularly so when considering downloads per subscriber.

Research limitations/implications

The authors conclude that the internet definitely helps heterodox research, also because other researchers get exposed to it. But there is still room for more participation by heterodox researchers.

Originality/value

The paper shows how RePEc and NEP try to pursue democracy and help in the dissemination of research. It also shows how heterodox communities can benefit and have benefited from this system, because they need new ways for disseminating research.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Bernardo Bátiz‐Lazo and Thomas Krichel

Applications of information technology have been directly responsible for the increase in productivity of business, government and academic activities. Business and management…

Abstract

Purpose

Applications of information technology have been directly responsible for the increase in productivity of business, government and academic activities. Business and management historians have yet to contribute to better understanding such processes. This paper aims to address this shortcoming through the internal and organisational history of a system for speedy, online distribution of recent additions to the broad literatures on economics and related areas called NEP: New Economic Papers.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a first person account (partly autobiographical) which also includes interviews and the use of archived e‐mail correspondence.

Findings

The advent of the internet promised a revolutionary change by democratising the social institutions related to the creation and dissemination of academic knowledge. Instead, this story tells how participants slowly but steadily tended to replicate established institutions.

Social implications

This paper provides a story of the NEP project and shows how one person's drive could generate a broader community of volunteers (constituted by a large number of academics and practitioners who provide critical support for its functioning). The paper provides details of the social and technological challenges for the construction of the technological platform as well as the evolution of its governance.

Originality/value

There is no historiography in business and management history on how to deal with changes in archived material resulting from the application of information and telecommunication technologies. Given the rate of change for events in the third industrial revolution, this paper shows it is possible and indeed relevant to document events in the recent past.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Frederic S. Lee and Wolfram Elsner

The purpose of the “Introduction” is to provide the motivation and context for the articles of this special issue and an overview and summary of the contributions that follow.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the “Introduction” is to provide the motivation and context for the articles of this special issue and an overview and summary of the contributions that follow.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an overview and summary of the contributions in the special issue.

Findings

It is argued that heterodoxies had gained a considerable and growing influence on research orientations, methodologies, and critical reflections, also on the mainstream publishing practices, even in the mainstream. This has been widely acknowledged as “hip heterodoxy” recently. Thus, many heterodox economists have developed optimistic expectations for the future of the profession. However, that influence has left the main mechanisms of reproduction of the mainstream untouched. These are mass teaching, public advising, journal policies, and faculty recruitment. Above that, the last decade has seen something like a “counterattack” to safeguard these mainstream reproduction mechanisms. The means used for this seem to be journal (and publisher) rankings based on purely quantitative citation measures and “impact factors”. These have an obvious cumulative “economies‐of‐scale” effect which triggers a tendency towards reinforcement and collective monopolization of the dominating orientation. Department rankings and individual faculty evaluations are then based on journals rankings. As a result, there are observable tendencies towards the cleansing of economics departments in a number of countries.

Originality/value

The paper also discusses potential reasons and methods for alternative approaches to measure citation interrelations, networks, cooperation, and rankings among heterodoxies (journals and departments), and for alternatives of publishing and the future of heterodoxies in general. Finally, it draws the picture of the present situation and the foreseeable future of heterodoxies as it emerges from the 11 contributions of the special issue.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2022

Andrea Devecchi, Simona Bo, Luca De Carli, Erik Breda, Valentina Ponzo and Andrea Pezzana

The Mediterranean diet (MD) is a sustainable and healthy diet. However, compliance to the MD is still poor. Given this, the authors created a Web app to promote the MD. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The Mediterranean diet (MD) is a sustainable and healthy diet. However, compliance to the MD is still poor. Given this, the authors created a Web app to promote the MD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Web app YourPappa in terms of adherence to the MD.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed a Web app, YourPappa, with the aim of encouraging virtuous dietary habits through a reward mechanism. After that, a randomized controlled study was conducted. All participants were given written advice on correct nutrition. Moreover, the case group was trained on the use of the app. The MD adherence was evaluated by a validated questionnaire (Medi-Lite).

Findings

Cases found an average increase in the Medi-Lite scores of +7.1%, whereas controls showed an increase of +0.7% (p = 0.06; effect size 0.60). For most of the users, the Web app helped them to think about what they were buying and to promote the MD.

Research limitations/implications

Obesity and related diseases are a topical problem. New strategies are needed to counter it. This study showed interesting and encouraging results, which need further research and insight to be validated and supported.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that has evaluated the use of a Web app to stimulate the adoption of the MD through a reward mechanism.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 53 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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