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1 – 10 of 11
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Daiane Lampugnani Marafon, Kenny Basso, Lélis Balestrin Espartel, Márcia Dutra de Barcellos and Eduardo Rech

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the moderating role of self-confidence and risk acceptance on the relationship between perceived risk and intention to use internet banking.

2012

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the moderating role of self-confidence and risk acceptance on the relationship between perceived risk and intention to use internet banking.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted with 180 Brazilian banking customers. The Johnson-Neyman test was used to verify the moderation and significant regions along self-confidence and risk acceptance levels.

Findings

Self-confidence and risk acceptance moderate the relationship between risk perception and intention to use internet banking. For individuals with high self-confidence, the effect of perceived risk on intention to use internet banking is lower than it is for individuals with low self-confidence. In the same way, for individuals with high risk acceptance, the effect of perceived risk on intention to use internet banking is lower than it is for individuals with low risk acceptance.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the understanding of the conditions (two personal factors) under which risk perception does not influence intention to use a technological tool.

Practical implications

This paper provides insights for marketing managers to encourage customers to develop greater risk acceptance and self-confidence to minimize the negative effects of perceived risk of the adoption of internet banking.

Originality/value

Although risk perception can contribute to customers’ avoidance of internet banking, this is the first paper to verify how acceptance of risk and self-confidence can moderate the effects of perceived risk on intention to use internet banking.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Paola Graciano, Aline Cafruni Gularte, Fernando Henrique Lermen and Marcia Dutra de Barcellos

The purpose of this paper is to identify the personal values of consumers of ethical cosmetics in Brazil, using the resulting personality types to segment consumers for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the personal values of consumers of ethical cosmetics in Brazil, using the resulting personality types to segment consumers for the development of strategies by Brazilian retailers and international players.

Design/methodology/approach

This study administered the psychometric Values and Lifestyles Scale (VALS) via an online survey with 302 consumers of ethical cosmetics. First, exploratory factorial analysis was employed to identify the behavior of VALS' factors within the sample. Second, cluster analysis was performed using hierarchical clustering technique in order to link demographic variables and VALS' types to form specific consumer profiles.

Findings

The study found eight VALS types in the sample respondents but with a different configuration than the original factors. They were named, respectively, “Avant-garde”, “Oriented to fashion”, “Artisans”, “Committed to morality and religion”, “Leader of a group”, “Theoretical”, “Ingenious” and “Conservative”. Results indicated a demographically homogeneous sample with personality profiles mostly placed among VALS' original factors “Experiencer”, “Thinker” and “Innovator”.

Research limitations/implications

Results may vary within other cultural contexts and different means of investigation suggesting future research opportunities.

Practical implications

Ethical demands concerning health and environmental preservation are no longer neglectable. The study of consumers' personal values can contribute to formulate suitable retail strategies for expected demands of consumers in the ethical cosmetics segment.

Originality/value

These findings are expected to provide resources for decision-makers, academics, practitioners and marketers concerning several points of sensitivity in their relationship with ethical consumers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Natália Rohenkohl do Canto, Marilia Bonzanini Bossle, Luciana Marques Vieira and Marcia Dutra De Barcellos

This paper investigates how chain members collaborate to ensure the sustainability of supply chains through the social capital perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates how chain members collaborate to ensure the sustainability of supply chains through the social capital perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a case study design, three social capital mechanisms – reach, richness and receptivity – were used as a lens with two eco-innovative food companies and their respective supply chains in Southern Brazil. Data consisted of interviews and other sources of evidence obtained from multiple stakeholders.

Findings

Results highlight the importance of a managerial orientation for sustainability and that sustainable chains presuppose a network that is closely linked and with great affinity. Not only does the management of operations improve the green performance of companies for environmental benchmarking but it also expands to include the supply chain. Social capital mechanisms can encourage partners to develop strategic initiatives for sustainability, especially if managers share key drivers for adopting eco-innovations and overall chain sustainability.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to research on collaboration within sustainable supply chain management. Empirical data were gathered from different stakeholders in two food chains in a developing country. Through the lens of social capital mechanisms, the paper shows how different types of companies collaborate in their supply chain for sustainability.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Isadora do Carmo Stangherlin and Marcia Dutra de Barcellos

The purpose of this paper is to analyse main drivers and barriers to food waste reduction in the consumption phase and analyse pathways to anti-wastage behaviours.

4366

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse main drivers and barriers to food waste reduction in the consumption phase and analyse pathways to anti-wastage behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was performed in order to understand the main variables affecting the behaviour and to identify pathways to move to an anti-waste behaviour. In the end, 84 articles were selected for the final analysis.

Findings

Drivers and barriers to reduce food waste were categorised in societal factors, personal factors and behavioural factors. Variables can increase the amount of waste (+) or reduce it (−). From them, efforts to move to an anti-wastage behaviour are classified in macro-environmental change, retailers’ engagement, raise awareness of the issue and creating anti-wastage social norms.

Research limitations/implications

The systematic review did not capture all variables that can influence consumer food waste and it is necessary different approaches to study the issue.

Practical implications

From the drivers for food waste reduction it is possible to design efforts to help consumers change their pattern of behaviour.

Social implications

Reducing food waste has effects in changing economic inequality, relative poverty and environmental damages.

Originality/value

The great majority of studies that analyse consumer food waste focus on behaviours that increase food waste. This special paper identifies how to stimulate and proactively work with behaviours that help to food waste reduction.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2018

Alexia Hoppe, Marcia Dutra De Barcellos, Marcelo Gattermann Perin, Lina Fogt Jacobsen and Liisa Lähteenmäki

Consumers can be an interesting source of knowledge if companies manage to attract them to an interactive process of new product development (NPD). The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers can be an interesting source of knowledge if companies manage to attract them to an interactive process of new product development (NPD). The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors influencing consumers’ willingness to participate in NPD activities.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey with 1,038 respondents was held in Denmark. Food products for weight management were used as an example to further explore these issues and test the research hypotheses. Data were analysed by means of hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Results indicated that consumer innovativeness is a key factor to stimulate participation. An increase in either cognitive or emotional dimensions also encourages consumer interaction with the company. Weight perception and willingness to participate is moderated by age group. These findings can help managers to identify key segments when developing new food products for weight management.

Originality/value

This study has proposed and tested a model based on relevant literature and validated scales using a model generation approach to discuss motivations and factors that influence willingness to participate in NPD projects in the food sector.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Marilia Bonzanini Bossle, Marcia Dutra De Barcellos and Luciana Marques Vieira

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how internal and external factors can influence on the adoption of eco-innovation by food companies. Although innovation and…

2137

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how internal and external factors can influence on the adoption of eco-innovation by food companies. Although innovation and sustainability are relevant concepts, they are not being considered together in the literature. Hereof, eco-innovation encloses both approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey with 581 Brazilian companies was conducted. The structure of influential internal and external factors was analysed by an exploratory factor analysis, and the relations between groups of variables identified in the study were verified through regression analysis. Environmental capability, environmental managerial concern and human resources were internal factors investigated in this study, and regulatory and normative pressures, cooperation and government support were the external factors.

Findings

Human resources was the most important internal factor, followed by environmental managerial concern and environmental capability. Collaboration was the most important external factor, followed by normative pressures and environmental regulations, while government support was seen as deficient. Companies stated that these factors were important to adopt environmental practices and increase performance.

Practical implications

Understanding why food companies adopt eco-innovation will help policy makers to develop specific actions to promote eco-innovations. For managers, it can be a relevant tool to identify which factors to invest, if the company is eco-strategizing. Hiring committed staff, top management green consciousness and collaboration with key stakeholders can boost sustainability.

Originality/value

This study brings an innovative approach with robust theoretical support in a comprehensive conceptual model, gathering and investigating all relevant internal and external factors in the literature. Those factors are used in an integrated way in the final model for the empirical investigation, while the literature generally emphasizes only external factors.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Luciana Marques Vieira, Marcia Dutra De Barcellos, Alexia Hoppe and Silvio Bitencourt da Silva

Several studies focus on agri-food value chain from a consumer or from a supply chain perspective. But there is little investigation integrating both approaches and…

4321

Abstract

Purpose

Several studies focus on agri-food value chain from a consumer or from a supply chain perspective. But there is little investigation integrating both approaches and providing empirical evidence from developing countries. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, it describes the supply chain of organic products in Brazil, which is an emerging market. It describes how retailers manage its supply chain (wholesalers and small producers) in an organic own brand of fresh products. Second, this paper identifies the motivations, attitudes, beliefs and personal values behind Brazilian consumers' decision to purchase organic food.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative and quantitative techniques were used in two stages. First, it presents a case study of the organic supply chain. Then, a survey carried out with 261 consumers at supermarkets in a Brazilian city is presented.

Findings

The case study points out that retailers transfer to wholesalers the responsibility to manage small organic producers. It also suggests that as the organic product is under the retailer own brand, and therefore most of the value perceived by the consumer is retained by the retailer. Survey results indicate that organic consumers have strong individual values and benefits are the most significant predictors of attitude toward organic food for the Brazilian consumers interviewed. Availability is significantly related to the intent to purchase organic food, which is a key point for the supply chain to respond efficiently to consumers' demand.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on a single case study and the survey is applied in only one city of Brazil.

Originality/value

The study contributes to expand the value analysis through a combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques, including consumer behaviour and supply chain management in the same analysis. It also adds to the debate on value, proposing Schwartz Value Theory as a complementary approach to value analysis.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

John Thøgersen, Marcia Dutra de Barcellos, Marcelo Gattermann Perin and Yanfeng Zhou

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if consumer buying motives regarding organic food in emerging economies China and Brazil are culture bound or determined by key…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if consumer buying motives regarding organic food in emerging economies China and Brazil are culture bound or determined by key characteristics of the product.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was collected in Guangzhou, China, and Porto Alegre, Brazil. Data were analyzed by means of structural equation modeling, checking for measurement invariance between samples.

Findings

The reasons why Brazilian and Chinese consumers buy organic food are strikingly similar to what is found in Europe and North America. Consumers’ attitude toward buying organic food is strongly linked to beliefs about its healthiness, taste and environmental friendliness. Also, consumer attitudes toward buying organic food are positively related to what Schwartz’s “Universalism” values in all studied cultures.

Research limitations/implications

Correlational (survey) data do not allow conclusions about causality and conclusions are limited by the covered countries and products.

Practical implications

Key consumer value propositions with respect to organic food seem cross-culturally valid and universally accepted by a segment of customers that share these values. Hence, organic food can be marketed globally based on a universal set of key value propositions. The same could be true for other global products sharing similar types of certifiable value propositions.

Social implications

New insights of value for the cross-cultural marketing of “green” and ethical consumer products.

Originality/value

Fills a gap in research regarding the extent to which consumer purchase motives are culture bound or determined by the characteristics of the product.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 32 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Martin Hingley and Adam Lindgreen

547

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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