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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Marcel Tichem, Defeng Lang and Bernhard Karpuschewski

This paper proposes a classification scheme for the quantified analysis of micro‐grip principles. Micro‐part gripping has received quite some attention in micro‐assembly…

1203

Abstract

This paper proposes a classification scheme for the quantified analysis of micro‐grip principles. Micro‐part gripping has received quite some attention in micro‐assembly research. However, there is a lack of quantified data on the characteristics and applicability of micro‐grip principles. The micro‐grip principle is the physical principle that produces the necessary forces to get and maintain a part in a position with respect to the gripper. The classification scheme defines criteria that are essential in the evaluation and selection of a micro‐grip principle for gripping a given part. The criteria are defined on the basis of characteristics of the parts to be gripped, demands on the grip operation to be performed and characteristics of the environment in which the grip operation takes place. The classification scheme is evaluated using examples from literature.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Vincent Henneken, Marcel Tichem and Bernhard Karpuschewski

An alternative way of performing micro‐assembly tasks is by means of product‐internal assembly functions. After a coarse alignment step, the parts are fine positioned…

Abstract

An alternative way of performing micro‐assembly tasks is by means of product‐internal assembly functions. After a coarse alignment step, the parts are fine positioned relative to each other by functionality that is integrated with the product. This functionality includes part actuation, position sensing and part freezing. They replace expensive machinery and delicate manual labour, and are aimed to result in lower total production costs. Micro electro mechanical system (MEMS) technology has important benefits to be used as supporting technology, because it allows for cost reduction (batch production), and structures can be made with small dimensions and high accuracy. The objective of this paper is to develop a reliable and reproducible interconnection technology using MEMS‐based product‐internal assembly functions, by which packaging cost is reduced and yield is improved. The considered case is the packaging of optical fibre to chip couplings.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Jan‐Mark Vorstenbosch, Fabien Bourgeois, Sandra Koelemeijer Chollet and Marcel Tichem

In this paper, a flexible solution for part feeding in assembly is analysed for its suitability to feed small parts with typical dimensions between 0.5 and 5.0 mm. The…

Abstract

In this paper, a flexible solution for part feeding in assembly is analysed for its suitability to feed small parts with typical dimensions between 0.5 and 5.0 mm. The feeding concept is based on a tooling plate, which vibrates to separate and reorient the parts. A vision system is used to determine the position of parts in a correct orientation. A robot picks these parts and assembles them. The conditions for a successful reorientation of parts are studied. The influence of adhesive forces on the ability to re‐orientate is investigated. A prototype is built to determine empirically the magnitude of the adhesive forces and the influence of these forces on the feeding process.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Abstract

Details

Transitions through the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-462-6

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Juhani Heilala and Paavo Voho

Market turbulence forces assembly plants to constantly adjust their production volume of products, variants and quantities. At the same time, assembly plant managers must…

2919

Abstract

Market turbulence forces assembly plants to constantly adjust their production volume of products, variants and quantities. At the same time, assembly plant managers must protect long‐term investments in the flexible assembly system. For reconfigurability and agility the best solution is the modular semi‐automatic approach by combining flexible automation and human skills. It gives managers possibility to adjust volume by adding new modules or to automate the manual tasks step by step. The control of material handling and information flow in the agile assembly system is important. To keep flexibility, the combination of an intelligent pallet, i.e. use of escort memory, carrying a single product together with other hardware providing paperless production even supports a lot size of one. The article shows how to create flexible capability and capacity in the final assembly systems.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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