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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Marcel Bogers, Henry Chesbrough and Robert Strand

This paper describes the case of how the Danish beer manufacturer, Carlsberg, developed the Green Fiber Bottle as part of its sustainability program through an open…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes the case of how the Danish beer manufacturer, Carlsberg, developed the Green Fiber Bottle as part of its sustainability program through an open innovation approach in collaboration with complementary partners. It thereby illustrates how a grand challenge associated with sustainability can be effectively addressed through open innovation and reveals the opportunities and challenges that emerge in that context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarizes some key elements of the case and, in particular, discusses some of the lessons learned, which can be further explored in future research, practice, and policy.

Findings

The case suggests a number of key issues that are relevant when attempting to address grand challenges, in general, and sustainability in the food and beverage (F&B) industry, in particular, namely: leveraging open innovation in the face of sustainability as a grand challenge; sustainability beyond a solid business case; opportunities and challenges in the face of new business models; the importance of early wins for addressing societal challenges for signals and scaling; and the importance of the Nordic context and long-term vision.

Originality/value

The case describes a recent (and to some extent still ongoing) initiative of how a particular F&B company has explored new approaches to developing its sustainability program. Therefore, it highlights some of the unique characteristics of this case. This paper also lays the groundwork for the establishment of “Sustainable Open Innovation” as a domain in its own right.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Marcel Bogers and Jørgen Dejgård Jensen

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore different business models that are active in the gastronomic industry and assess where there may be opportunities and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore different business models that are active in the gastronomic industry and assess where there may be opportunities and limitations for innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a conceptualization of the business model concept and some of its main components – considering an internal and external orientation – and how they can be applied to the gastronomic sector. On this basis, the authors propose, develop and test an empirical framework for the economic sustainability of gastronomic enterprises. Based on data from a publicly available database of the Danish hospitality sector, the authors conduct hierarchical cluster analysis to identify different business models for the Danish gastronomic sector.

Findings

Given the diversity of the gastronomic sector, there can be a multitude of alternative business models and characteristics, which may enable the sector to create value through, for example, product differentiation, market segmentation, and so on. The analysis revealed nine different clusters, which represent different business models in terms of value creation, segmentation, and resource utilization – highlighting either more closed or open business models. These business models offer a basis for considering the opportunities and barriers for business model innovation – for both startups and incumbent firms – within gastronomy and agri-food more generally.

Originality/value

The gastronomic sector is diverse and heterogeneous with a multitude of possible alternative business models. This paper provides a basis for considering the key enablers of business model development in this sector. The integrative framework and empirical assessment provides a basis for further exploring business model innovation in the gastronomic sector in particular and the agri-food sector more generally.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Maral Mahdad, Thai Thi Minh, Marcel L.A.M. Bogers and Andrea Piccaluga

There is little known about investigating the importance of all proximity dimensions simultaneously as a result of geographical proximity on university-industry…

Abstract

Purpose

There is little known about investigating the importance of all proximity dimensions simultaneously as a result of geographical proximity on university-industry collaborative innovation. This paper aims to answer the question of how geographically proximate university and industry influence cognitive, social, organizational, institutional and cultural proximity within university-industry joint laboratories and finally, what is the outcome of these interplays on collaborative innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an exploratory multiple-case study approach. The results are derived from 53 in-depth, semistructured interviews with laboratory directors and representatives from both the company and the university within 8 joint laboratories of Telecom Italia (TIM). The data collection was carried out in 2014 and 2015. The analysis follows a multi-grounded theory approach and relies on a mix of deductive and inductive reasoning with the final goal of theoretical elaboration.

Findings

This study finds the role of social and cultural proximity at the individual level as a result of geographical proximity as an enabler of collaborative innovation by triggering mutual learning, trust formation and frequent interactions. Cognitive proximity at the interface level could systematically influence collaborative innovation, while organizational and institutional proximity has marginal roles in facilitating collaborative innovation. The qualitative analysis offers a conceptual framework for proximity dimensions and collaborative innovation within university-industry joint laboratories.

Practical implications

The framework not only advances state-of-the-art university-industry collaboration and proximity dimension but also offers guidance for managers in designing collaborative innovation settings between university and industry.

Originality/value

With this study, the paper advances the understanding beyond solely the relationship between proximity and collaboration and shed light on the interplay between geographical proximity and other proximity dimensions in this context, which has received limited scholarly attention.

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Vanessa Ratten, Carlos Costa and Marcel Bogers

The purpose of this paper is to focus on emerging research avenues for artisan entrepreneurship. The key findings of the articles in the special journal issue are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on emerging research avenues for artisan entrepreneurship. The key findings of the articles in the special journal issue are discussed in terms of potential research issues that need to be discussed in future work.

Design/methodology/approach

An overview of the main themes of artisan entrepreneurship in terms of cultural and tourism perspectives is undertaken. This helps to establish artisan entrepreneurship as a new and emerging field of entrepreneurship studies.

Findings

There is more interest in artisan entrepreneurship due to its role in revitalizing economies and placing emphasis on cultural heritage and traditions.

Originality/value

This paper will provide directions for future research on artisan, cultural and tourism entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2022

Shraddha Bhadauria and Vinay Singh

This paper aims to explore the relationship between open innovation (OI) and absorptive capacity (AC) using a bibliometric analysis of existing literature.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between open innovation (OI) and absorptive capacity (AC) using a bibliometric analysis of existing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The bibliometric analysis is used to review the covered research articles in the Web of Science (WoS) database. The time span covered over 20 years from the year 2000 to 2020.

Findings

The study suggests that it is an attracting and growing field for researchers, and there exists a close relationship between OI and AC. Further, the literature has parted into three research streams (1) AC and OI: dependency and interchangeability; (2) OI and its future avenues (3) OI and AC: critical factor for firm innovation performance which elaborate various future scopes to study.

Research limitations/implications

The study's limitations exist with the biasness in database selection criteria, such as the possible non-inclusion of crucial articles.

Practical implications

The study’s implications are to discern close association and path dependency of AC and OI; and facilitate the innovation performance of the firm via developing of AC.

Originality/value

The approach used is a novelty, and the conclusions can better understand the relationship between both terms (OI and AC). Thus, it can help increase firm innovation performance.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Kristian J. Sund, Robert J. Galavan and Marcel Bogers

In this paper, we reflect on an expanding literature that links theories of cognition and business models. Managers hold in their mind perceptual constructs or schemas of…

Abstract

In this paper, we reflect on an expanding literature that links theories of cognition and business models. Managers hold in their mind perceptual constructs or schemas of the business model. These guide the process of distinguishing between options and making choices. Those familiar with business model development will easily recognise that the perceptual construct provides only a summary of the business model, and that a more complex conceptualisation of how business model elements interact is needed. The business model is then much more than a visualisation. It is a schematic model of theorised interaction that is created, shaped, and shared over time. The underlying processes of this creation, shaping, and sharing are cognitive activities taking place at individual, organisational, and inter-organisational levels. Theories of managerial and organisational cognition are thus critical to understanding the acts of business modelling and business model innovation. Here we suggest some of the ways that business model and cognition literatures can be connected, present existing literature, and reflect on future avenues of research to explore the cognitive foundations of business modelling.

Details

Business Models and Cognition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-063-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Antonio Daood, Cinzia Calluso and Luca Giustiniano

Decision-making has long been recognized as being at the core of organizational life. Yet, the cognitive mechanisms by which managers make decisions represent a critical…

Abstract

Decision-making has long been recognized as being at the core of organizational life. Yet, the cognitive mechanisms by which managers make decisions represent a critical field of exploration. In this context, business models (BMs) are cognitive representations of organizational architectures that managers use to orient their firms in the business environment. While BMs – as managerial schemas – have been extensively studied for their beneficial applications at the strategic level, scholarly attention has rarely focused on their dark side. In this chapter, we point out that BM thinking – that focuses excessively on established schemas – might narrow managerial cognition in the process of fine-tuning the current BM; in the process, opportunities for more radical BM innovation can be overlooked. We systematize March and Simon’s contribution on managerial cognition into a more comprehensive conceptual framework by integrating the perspectives of Kahneman, Baron, and Gollwitzer. The result is an epistemologically coherent framework for managerial cognition and decision-making that focuses on how managers can overcome cognitive biases that derive from a reliance on established BMs as schemas. We close this chapter with directions for further research.

Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Business Models and Cognition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-063-2

Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Maral Mahdad, Marcel Bogers, Andrea Piccaluga and Alberto Di Minin

University–industry collaborations are an important driver of innovation that highlights the benefits of collaborative processes across organizational boundaries. However…

Abstract

University–industry collaborations are an important driver of innovation that highlights the benefits of collaborative processes across organizational boundaries. However, like in most collaborative processes, many challenges remain when trying to manage the process of knowledge sharing and interaction in university–industry partnerships. In this chapter, the authors specifically investigate how leadership as a managerial dimension facilitates collaboration within university–industry joint laboratories. The authors present an explorative and inductive case study of eight joint laboratories set up by Telecom Italia within five major Italian universities. The results show that the laboratory directors play a crucial role in providing a dynamic and socially active working environment, which is enabled through a process of sensemaking and sensegiving. The authors, moreover, find that this process plays a crucial role by shaping effective communication channels that facilitate knowledge sharing and transfer of information. The authors find that this process ultimately acts as a mediator between charismatic leadership on the individual level and distributed leadership on the collective level.

Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Ksenia Podoynitsyna, Yuliya Snihur, Llewellyn D. W. Thomas and Denis A. Grégoire

We investigate how Salesforce’s key people used analogies and metaphors during the deployment of their (then) radical business model innovation. Our analysis shows how…

Abstract

We investigate how Salesforce’s key people used analogies and metaphors during the deployment of their (then) radical business model innovation. Our analysis shows how Salesforce’s entrepreneurial team skillfully used a mix of analogies and metaphors to communicate its innovations and differentiate the company from its competitors. We also show how business model innovators can weave together analogies and metaphors to create distinct meta-narratives that elicited strong emotions and helped construct a memorable organizational identity that galvanized stakeholders around the firm’s ecosystem appeal. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for business model and cognition research.

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