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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Jasmin Bergeron and Marc‐Antoine Vachon

For many years, the financial industry has been perceived as conservative, old‐fashioned, and somewhat tedious. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

For many years, the financial industry has been perceived as conservative, old‐fashioned, and somewhat tedious. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of humour usage by financial advisors on several sales performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was completed by more than 400 buyer‐seller dyads. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses were conducted. An important strength of SEM is its ability to incorporate the psychometric notions of constructs and measurement errors in the same estimation procedure.

Findings

A financial advisor's good sense of humour has a positive impact on the clients' perceptions of service quality, trust, satisfaction, purchase intentions, and word‐of‐mouth propensity.

Research limitations/implications

Although only customer perceptions were used, the paper suggests many ways to use the results as a spring board by sales researchers to accrue research efforts in understanding the truly rich role of humour.

Practical implications

Many practical implications are suggested to entice organizations to emphasize salespeople's humouristic skills as a competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This is believed to be the first paper to investigate the effects of humour usage in sales encounters in the financial industry. A better understanding of humour is useful for service providers owing to its mass potential, its low cost, and its positive benefits for customers and financial advisors alike.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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