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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Marc van Veldhoven and Luc Dorenbosch

The purpose of this study is to shed more light on the role of employee proactivity (self‐starting, action‐orientated behaviours aimed at greater organisational…

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7498

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to shed more light on the role of employee proactivity (self‐starting, action‐orientated behaviours aimed at greater organisational effectiveness) in relation to aging and career development. It aims to do this in two ways. First, by investigating how age and HR practices for development initiated by the organisation influence proactivity. Here, proactivity it seeks to study as a career‐relevant outcome. Second, by examining how age, proactivity and HR practices for development influence employee experiences of career opportunities. Here, it aims to use proactivity as career‐relevant predictor.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 619 employees from 47 departments completed a questionnaire, including two scales on proactivity (on‐the‐job and developmental proactivity) as well as a scale on career opportunities. HR and line managers in these departments were interviewed about HR practices directed at career development of the employees. The data combine information from two levels (employee, department) as well as three different sources (employee, line manager, HR manager), and are analysed using multi‐level analysis.

Findings

First, the paper presents the results on proactivity as an outcome: age is positively related to proactivity on‐the‐job but has no association with proactivity towards development. HR practices targeted at career development are positively associated with both types of proactivity. Second, the results on proactivity as a predictor show that career opportunities have a negative association with age, a positive association with proactivity, and a positive association with career development‐orientated HR practices. An additional negative effect on career opportunities is found for the cross‐level interaction between HR practices and age.

Originality/value

This study is original as it combines individual, psychological, and HR perspectives in researching age‐related career issues. It contributes to the literature by showing that age has no negative, but rather a positive impact on proactivity. Proactivity furthermore is sensitive to HR practices for development, implying that organisations can influence the proactivity of their employees. For older employees the study implies that, although organisations tend to offer them fewer HR practices for development, they can offset this disadvantage to some extent by increased proactivity, and thus retain career opportunities.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Paul van der Laken, Marloes van Engen, Marc van Veldhoven and Jaap Paauwe

The purpose of this paper is to review empirical research on the relationship between organization-based social support and the success of international assignments (IAs).

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1572

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review empirical research on the relationship between organization-based social support and the success of international assignments (IAs).

Design/methodology/approach

Four search engines were used to obtain empirical studies relating organization-based social support to success criteria. Studies were compared based on type of theoretical foundation, criteria of success, source of social support and study design.

Findings

The reviewed studies draw on three theoretical paradigms – based on stress, social capital and relational exchange. The results demonstrate that expatriates receive social support from multiple organization-based sources and that these sources’ proximity to the expatriate influences the relationship between social support and success. Regarding geographical proximity, sources in the home and host countries fulfil different supportive functions and therefore stimulate different success criteria. Additionally, the success criteria stimulated by organizational support depend on the type of supportive practices offered. The impact of support from organizational members is further influenced by their hierarchical proximity to the expatriate, with supervisory support relating most strongly to success. In addition to proximity, characteristics of the expatriating employee and the assignment (e.g. expatriate motivation and assignment hardship) influence the value of social support. Finally, social support relates most strongly to expatriates’ satisfaction, commitment, and adjustment and these frequently mediate its effect on expatriates’ retention and performance.

Research limitations/implications

Although only organization-based sources were considered, this review demonstrates that a multidimensional perspective is warranted when examining the effects of social support during IAs.

Practical implications

This review provides insights into the ways organizations could and should assist (self-initiated) expatriates when aiming for specific outcomes.

Originality/value

This in-depth examination of social support in the work environment of expatriates combines several theoretical paradigms and investigates multiple criteria of success.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Atsede Tesfaye Hailemariam, Brigitte Kroon, Marloes van Engen and Marc van Veldhoven

Taking a self-determination theory (SDT) perspective, the purpose of this paper is to understand the socio-cultural context on the satisfaction of basic psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

Taking a self-determination theory (SDT) perspective, the purpose of this paper is to understand the socio-cultural context on the satisfaction of basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness in the entrepreneurial activity of women entrepreneurs in Ethiopia.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 19 women entrepreneurs operating business in the formal sector of the economy in Addis Ababa. A thematic analysis approach was used to analyze and interpret the interview transcripts.

Findings

Women entrepreneurs experience autonomy-supportive and controlling socio-cultural contexts in their gender role, parent–daughter relationship, husband–wife relationship and their religious affiliation. Autonomy-supportive social agents provide women entrepreneurs, the chance to perceive themselves as competent and autonomous to exploit and choose opportunities and run their business in accordance with their personal values and interests. On the other hand, controlling social agents maintain and reinforce the existing male-dominated social and economic order. They constrain women’s entrepreneurial performance by undermining their basic psychological needs satisfaction, which limits their autonomous functioning and well-being in entrepreneurial activity.

Practical implications

To promote women’s autonomous functioning and well-being in entrepreneurial activity, policy should be aimed at reducing constraints to the satisfaction of psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness in the socio-cultural context.

Originality/value

The study is the first to apply SDT to explore the influence of autonomy vs controlling socio-cultural contexts on satisfaction vs thwarting needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness in the entrepreneurial activity of women.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Karen Pak, Dorien Kooij, Annet H. De Lange, Maria Christina Meyers and Marc van Veldhoven

Employees need a sustainable career to prolong their working lives. The ability, motivation and opportunity to work form an important basis for sustainable careers across…

Abstract

Purpose

Employees need a sustainable career to prolong their working lives. The ability, motivation and opportunity to work form an important basis for sustainable careers across the lifespan. However, over the lifespan of their careers employees are likely to experience several career shocks (e.g. becoming chronically ill or being fired) which might result in unsustainable trajectories. This study aims to contribute to the literature on sustainable careers by unraveling the process through which careers shocks relate to career (un)sustainability and what role perceptions of human resource practices play in the process.

Design/methodology/approach

Thirty-three in-depth retrospective interviews with participants of 50 years and older were conducted and analyzed using a template analysis.

Findings

Results showed that career shocks influence career sustainability through a process of changes in demands or changes in resources, which in turn, relate to changes in person–job fit. When person-job–fit diminished, the ability, motivation and opportunity to continue working decreased, whereas when person–job fit improved, the ability, motivation and opportunity to continue working improved as well. Organizations appear to be able to diminish the negative consequences of career shocks by offering job resources such as HR practices in response to career shocks.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is the retrospective nature of the interviews, which could have resulted in recollection bias.

Practical implications

This study gives HRM practitioners insight into the HR practices that are effective in overcoming career shocks.

Originality/value

This study extends existing literature by including career shocks as possible predictors of sustainable careers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Bart Cambré, Evelien Kippers, Marc van Veldhoven and Hans De Witte

This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of group level differences in job satisfaction. Specifically, the authors seek to understand the shared variance in job…

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8322

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of group level differences in job satisfaction. Specifically, the authors seek to understand the shared variance in job satisfaction at the group level of jobs within organisations, in a particular industrial sector. To explain differences in job satisfaction between groups, the authors examine the role of job characteristics, particularly as these are defined within the job‐demand‐control‐support model.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the results of a cross‐sectional self‐report questionnaire study of 2,733 Belgian bank employees working in six specific jobs and four specific organisations. Research hypotheses are tested using multilevel analyses.

Findings

There are substantial and reliable between‐group differences in job satisfaction within the banking sector. These effects are partially explained by job characteristics from the JDCS model at the individual level. At the aggregated level, only decision authority is statistically significant.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to Belgium and to the banking sector. The general research question and findings are nevertheless relevant to other single‐sector studies in Western European countries.

Practical implications

Decision authority is more important for group level job satisfaction than job demands and social support from colleagues and supervisors. Human resources managers are therefore recommended to focus more on structural differences and organisational choices that may affect job design and work systems.

Originality/value

The paper aims to make a contribution to the understanding of group level job satisfaction differences in the context of sector studies.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Heilwine Bakker, Marc van Veldhoven, Tony Gaillard, Remy Hertogs and Margot Feenstra

Since policemen have a highly demanding job, they have a high risk of developing mental health problems, which may have a negative influence on their private life. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Since policemen have a highly demanding job, they have a high risk of developing mental health problems, which may have a negative influence on their private life. The purpose of this paper is to present a new questionnaire for measuring the functioning of rescue workers in life tasks outside of work.

Design/methodology/approach

The internal consistency, factor structure and concurrent validity of this life tasks test (LTT) were examined in a group of 108 policemen.

Findings

The test measures perceived effectiveness in the following five domains: social life, maintaining mental health, household and finance, giving meaning and maintaining positivity. Cronbach’s α was acceptable for two scales (>0.60) and good for the other three (>0.70). The hypothesized five-factor structure of the LTT was corroborated in a confirmatory factor analysis. Concurrent validity was examined by correlating the scores on the LTT with two established questionnaires, one for personality characteristics and one for work characteristics and work stress. All LTT scales, with the exception of social life, showed significant correlations with social support, workload and personality.

Research limitations/implications

This provides support for the concurrent validity of the questionnaire. Practical uses and future research are discussed.

Practical implications

The items are close to everyday clinical practice. It adds valuable information to the commonly used questionnaires on mental health complaints. The test may also provide insight on which life tasks domains are functioning well and which are in need of attention to improve the effectiveness.

Social implications

In both preventive and curative mental health support, it is important to enhance the effectiveness in life tasks, because it works as a buffer for the adversity of rescue work. Moreover, it gives rescue workers mastery of their personal life, makes self-management stronger, as well as it gives feelings of confidence and positive energy.

Originality/value

This is the first questionnaire to be designed and implemented for rescue workers.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Birgit Schyns, Marc van Veldhoven and Stephen Wood

Organizational climate has been shown to predict job satisfaction and other employee attitudes. Using the concept of organizational climate, strength has shown mixed…

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6758

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational climate has been shown to predict job satisfaction and other employee attitudes. Using the concept of organizational climate, strength has shown mixed success. However, diversity in psychological climate at the individual level has not been explored. The paper aims to introduce a new individual‐level concept: relative psychological climate paper.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the example of supportive leadership climate, the significance of this concept for predicting job satisfaction is assessed. Data from a large national British survey (the Workplace Employment Relations Survey of 2004) of 19,993 employees within 1,593 workplaces are used.

Findings

Workplace supportive leadership climate quality, climate strength and individual relative leadership climate position are shown to be significantly associated with job satisfaction. So is the interaction of climate quality and climate strength. When all three variables are assessed simultaneously, only the individual relative position and the climate quality are substantially related to job satisfaction.

Originality/value

Individual relative climate is introduced and the shows that this new concept is related to job satisfaction, thereby demonstrating its usefulness in climate research.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Fabian J. Froese and Soo Min Toh

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568

Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Antonia Ruiz Moreno, María Isabel Roldán Bravo, Carlos García-Guiu, Luis M. Lozano, Natalio Extremera Pacheco, Ginés Navarro-Carrillo and Inmaculada Valor-Segura

This paper aims to report the findings of a study examining the relationship between different leadership styles and engagement through the mediating role of proactive personality.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the findings of a study examining the relationship between different leadership styles and engagement through the mediating role of proactive personality.

Design/methodology/approach

Servant leadership, paradoxical leadership, authentic leadership, employee engagement and proactive personality were assessed in an empirical study based on a sample of 348 military personnel in Spain. The questionnaire data were analyzed through SEM using EQS and bootstrapping analysis using the PROCESS macro for SPSS.

Findings

The results reveal that servant leadership style in officers partially impacts their cadets' engagement through proactive personality but that authentic and paradoxical leadership styles do not mediate the relationship. The authors also verify a direct relationship between proactive personality and engagement.

Practical implications

The study implications advance the literature on leadership in emphasizing new leadership styles to increase proactive personality and engagement in the military context. This study verifies the importance of military leaders fostering servant leadership as an antecedent of proactive personality. Finally, the authors show that servant leadership partially impacts engagement through proactive personality.

Originality/value

This study explores the relationship among servant, paradoxical and authentic leadership styles, proactive personality, and engagement – relationships that have not been explored theoretically and tested empirically in the military context.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2019

Alain Klarsfeld, Lena Knappert, Angela Kornau, Faith Wambura Ngunjiri and Barbara Sieben

The purpose of this paper is to further restore diversity and equality to its national contexts by presenting new and so far less visible perspectives from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further restore diversity and equality to its national contexts by presenting new and so far less visible perspectives from under-researched countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This special issue consists of five articles representing four countries and one country-cluster: Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ethiopia, Korea and the English-speaking Caribbean. Three of the contributions are focused on gender diversity, while the remaining two are more general descriptions of diversity challenges and policies in the respective countries (namely, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the English-speaking Caribbean).

Findings

In addition to providing an overview of this issue’s articles, this paper highlights developments and current themes in country-specific equality and diversity scholarship. In particular, drawing on the special issue’s five papers, and building on the main threads that weave the special issue together, the authors show both the relevance of (some) western theories while also pointing to the need for reformulation of others.

Research limitations/implications

The authors conclude with a call to further explore under-researched contexts and especially to develop locally relevant, culture-sensitive theoretical frameworks.

Originality/value

How do smaller and less developed countries experience equality and diversity concepts? How are their approaches different from those experienced in already researched countries, or, on the contrary, what commonalities can be found found among them? How do theoretical frameworks originated in the West apply (or not) in these less studied countries? Are new, locally grounded frameworks needed to better capture the developments at play? Such are questions addressed by the contributions to this special issue.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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