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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Marc van Lieshout, Linda Kool, Bas van Schoonhoven and Marjan de Jonge

The purpose of this paper is to develop/elaborate the concept Privacy by Design (PbD) and to explore the validity of the PbD framework.

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1875

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop/elaborate the concept Privacy by Design (PbD) and to explore the validity of the PbD framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Attention for alternative concepts, such as PbD, which might offer surplus value in safeguarding privacy, is growing. Using PbD to design for privacy in ICT systems is still rather underexplored and requires substantial conceptual and empirical work to be done. The methodology includes conceptual analysis, empirical validation (focus groups and interviews) and technological testing (a technical demonstrator was build).

Findings

A holistic PbD approach can offer surplus value in better safeguarding of privacy without losing functional requirements. However, the implementation is not easily realised and confronted with several difficulties such as: potential lack of economic incentives, legacy systems, lack of adoption of trust of end‐users and consumers in PbD.

Originality/value

The article brings together/incorporates several contemporary insights on privacy protection and privacy by design and develops/presents a holistic framework for Privacy by Design framework consisting of five building blocks.

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Corina Pascu and Marc van Lieshout

The paper attempts to reflect on user empowerment enabled by three contemporary approaches, namely living labs, open innovation and social computing, as innovation

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1495

Abstract

Purpose

The paper attempts to reflect on user empowerment enabled by three contemporary approaches, namely living labs, open innovation and social computing, as innovation instruments for innovating products and services based on next generation networks (NGNs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review, with limited environmental scanning of web sources, industry news, etc.

Findings

User‐centric services can be a catalyst for promoting future service ecosystems over NGN. Open strategies may prove to be profitable avenues for incumbents who may consider the extension of the market from access services into value added services. The living lab perspective, used as an approach of developing NGNs, introduces the opportunity to open new markets in new regions where new products and services can be tested and deployed. Living labs can also be used to go beyond the current “launch‐and‐learn” approach in online social communities to active end‐user participation in the online communities' development process. NGNs may be particularly useful for social computing, by offering incentives to create novel services that are fully created, developed and deployed by users.

Originality/value

This paper argues that user‐led innovation could be a significant paradigm shift for innovating products and services, particularly in the specific context of NGNs. It argues that this focus is lacking today, with most of the attention on specific NGN technology and infrastructure issues.

Details

info, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Content available
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135

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

José‐Luis Gómez‐Barroso and Claudio Feijóo

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the policy tools to complement public involvement and public‐private collaboration in the deployment of next

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977

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the policy tools to complement public involvement and public‐private collaboration in the deployment of next generation electronic communications infrastructures.

Design/methodology/approach

The special issue, of which this paper is a part, examines a number of policy tools that support public involvement and enhance public‐private partnering in next generation infrastructures, tools that are generally overlooked. The papers explore the main domains where these complementary actions might take place. They encompass policies directed to the demand and supply sides of the market, information society and industrial innovation policies, additional measures that can be taken by local and regional public administrations and new policy tools to foster user empowerment.

Findings

From the authors' perspective, public involvement and public‐private partnering for the deployment of next generation infrastructures in telecommunications will require an integrated policy approach. The appropriate policy mix includes instruments of innovation, information society development and new user empowerment.

Originality/value

This paper introduces a timely contribution to the debate on public support of next generation infrastructures in electronic communications.

Content available
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614

Abstract

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

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59

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Marc Graner and Magdalena Mißler‐Behr

In recent years, scholars have devoted increasing attention to the use of methods in new product development. Although their positive impact on product success has been…

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1558

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, scholars have devoted increasing attention to the use of methods in new product development. Although their positive impact on product success has been confirmed by a series of studies, little research has so far been conducted into the determinants of the successful method application. The purpose of this paper is to analyze two key determinants for the successful use of methods.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a structural equation modeling approach and analyzes the subject based on a large empirical sample of 410 product development projects.

Findings

The way the new product development process is formalized and the extent of top management support have a significant influence on the successful application of methods. Both factors lead to the use of more methods overall and drive the more thorough and intensive deployment of the specific methods used.

Practical implications

The paper shows how firms that are seeking a more methodical approach to new product development can consciously create the right determinants for the successful adoption of methods and by doing that can increase the success rate of their new product development activities.

Originality/value

This research adds to the literature on success factors of new product development in two distinct ways. First, the paper investigates the subject at the level of specific product development projects, based on a large empirical sample and using a structural equation modeling approach, for the first time. Second, the methods investigated were chosen in a systematic, multi step process in which the methods used by several functions involved in new product development were taken into account.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

N. Malanowski and R. Compañó

Many experts consider that the technological convergence of previously separated sciences like nanotechnology, biotechnology, information and communication technologies

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2108

Abstract

Purpose

Many experts consider that the technological convergence of previously separated sciences like nanotechnology, biotechnology, information and communication technologies and cognitive sciences, will – in the long term – impact deeply our society and economy. Key actors in society need to become aware of the challenges linked to converging applications (CA) and take some decision related to processes to develop these. It is hoped that analyzing CA‐related opportunities and risks at a very early stage will contribute to reduce possible adverse effects in the future. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based upon a literature review, complemented with ten expert interviews carried out over the telephone. The interviewees were natural and social scientists familiar with the topic of converging technologies/applications.

Findings

Setting priorities for discussion on research and strategy within and between the various fields of CA benefits from the early involvement of key stakeholders from the very beginning. Formulating and structuring relevant open questions on opportunities and possible risks of CA helps to contribute to a balanced discussion on opportunities and risks and further work on this topic.

Originality/value

The opportunity and risk analysis is exemplified for four promising areas at the intersection of cognitive science and ICT, namely human brain interfaces; speech recognition technologies; artificial neural networks; and robotics.

Details

Foresight, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2007

Andrew Gorman‐Murray

For geographers doing qualitative research, autobiographical narratives offer a discrete avenue into life experiences, everyday lived geographies, and intimate connections…

Abstract

For geographers doing qualitative research, autobiographical narratives offer a discrete avenue into life experiences, everyday lived geographies, and intimate connections between places and identities. Yet these valuable sources remain mostly untapped by geographers and largely unconsidered in methodological treatises. This article seeks to elicit the benefits of using autobiographical data, especially with regard to stigmatised sexual minorities in Western societies. Qualitative research among gay men, lesbians and bisexuals (GLB) is sometimes difficult; due to the ongoing marginalisation experienced by sexual minorities in contemporary Western societies, subjects are often difficult to locate and reticent to participate in research. But autobiographical writing has a long history in Western GLB subcultures, and offers an unobtrusive means to explore the interpenetration of stigmatised sexuality and space, of GLB identity and place. A keen awareness of the power of geography of spaces of concealment, resistance, connection, emergence and affirmation underpins the content and form of GLB autobiographical writing. I demonstrate this in part through the example of my own research into gay male spatiality in Australia. At the same time we need to be aware of the generic limitations of autobiographies. Nevertheless, this article calls for wider attention to autobiographical sources, especially for geographical research into marginalised groups.

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Sema Misci Kip and Pınar Umul Ünsal

This study aims to achieve broad insights into perceptions and attitudes of Turkish digital immigrants (DI) and digital natives (DN) toward native advertising (NA) format.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to achieve broad insights into perceptions and attitudes of Turkish digital immigrants (DI) and digital natives (DN) toward native advertising (NA) format.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on extant review of literature, semi-structured interview questions helped to solicit subjective interpretations, perceptions and attitudes of Turkish consumers toward NA format. In-depth interviews with 36 participants were conducted.

Findings

The study gains new knowledge on issues related to NA format, such as self-determination of viewing, privacy and accuracy of information. Findings provide whys and wherefores for these undiscovered issues, as well as for preexisting themes such as format recall and recognition, disclosure, communication/marketing aims, attitudes toward NA format, brand and publisher, NA placement and “nativity” of the format. In terms of perceptions and attitudes of DIs and DNs, both similarities and differences exist. DNs consider viewing NA content under their own initiative, so their perceptions and attitudes toward NA are shaped accordingly.

Research limitations/implications

The interviews were carried out in a single setting; with a convenience sample of consumers living in Izmir, Turkey. Certain age and education levels were considered desirable as main criteria for selection.

Practical implications

The study identifies consumer concerns on the NA format and content; and provides suggestions for advertisers, publishers and ad professionals on disclosure, relevancy and frequency of exposure, which can be applied in practice. Implications for public policy are also discussed.

Originality/value

This is the first known study to explore perceptions and attitudes of DIs and DNs toward NA format in the Turkish context. This study uncovers and discusses insights into underlying reasons of DI/DNs’ perceptions and attitudes. The study extends prior findings of quantitative research on NA, offering fruitful insights for future research.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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