Search results

1 – 8 of 8
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Brian Fahey and Marc Rinaldi

The purpose of this paper is to assist investment company managers in proactively navigating the risky and ever‐changing market and regulatory environment and to provide…

526

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assist investment company managers in proactively navigating the risky and ever‐changing market and regulatory environment and to provide an outline for a flexible and robust risk‐based compliance management methodology.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper makes recommendations on: becoming familiar with best practices in internal controls and regulatory trends, reassessing compliance management goals and objectives, identifying risk scenarios and related compliance events, designing control systems, updating compliance policies and procedures, and conducting periodic reviews of compliance management systems.

Findings

The paper reveals that compliance risks have attained a new level of visibility. To minimize potential hazards, current and evolving risks must be identified, documented and effectively managed by investment firms, regulators and legislators.

Originality/value

The paper provides practical advice by a compliance management systems provider and a consultant specializing in compliance and risk‐based due diligence consulting.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Henry A. Davis and James A. Tricarico Jr

310

Abstract

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

65225

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2014

Wen Lou and Junping Qiu

The paper aims to develop a new method for potential relations retrieval. It aims to find common aspects between co-occurrence analysis and ontology to build a model of…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to develop a new method for potential relations retrieval. It aims to find common aspects between co-occurrence analysis and ontology to build a model of semantic information retrieval based on co-occurrence analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a literature review, co-occurrence analysis, ontology build and other methods to design a model and process of semantic information retrieval based on co-occurrence analysis. Archaeological data from Wuhan University Library's bibliographic retrieval systems was used for experimental analysis.

Findings

The literature review found that semantic information retrieval research mainly concentrates on ontology-based query techniques, semantic annotation and semantic relation retrieval. Moreover most recent systems can only achieve obvious relations retrieval. Ontology and co-occurrence analysis have strong similarities in theoretical ideas, data types, expressions, and applications.

Research limitations/implications

The experiment data came from a Chinese university which perhaps limits its usefulness elsewhere.

Practical implications

This paper constructed a model to understand potential relations retrieval. An experiment proved the feasibility of co-occurrence analysis used in semantic information retrieval. Compared with traditional retrieval, semantic information retrieval based on co-occurrence analysis is more user-friendly.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to combine co-occurrence analysis with semantic information retrieval to find detailed relationships.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2022

Sharfuddin Ahmed Khan, Wafaa Laalaoui, Fatma Hokal, Mariam Tareq and Laila Ahmad

Reverse logistics (RL) has become integral in modern supply chains, with many companies investing in circular economy (CE), a recuperative and effective industrial…

Abstract

Purpose

Reverse logistics (RL) has become integral in modern supply chains, with many companies investing in circular economy (CE), a recuperative and effective industrial economy. The traditional linear model triggered many negative environmental consequences such as climate change, ocean pollution, loss of biodiversity and land degradation. The development of RL strategies that support the transition between RL to CE is crucial. The purpose of this paper is to connect RL with CE in the context of Industry 4.0 and develop a hierarchal structure to explore the relationship between RL and CE critical success factors in the context of Industry 4.0.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used both qualitative and quantitative approach. Literature review in collaboration with the Delphi method is used to identify and validate critical success factors. Then, the ISM-based model and MICMAC method were used to determine the relationship between CE and RL success factors and its driving and dependence power.

Findings

This study result shows that waste reduction, skilled employees and expert's involvement and top management commitment and support will provide guidelines and paths for implementing CE and RL, leading to the competitiveness of a firm.

Practical implications

The findings provide managerial insight, particularly useful to third-party logistics companies' managers who are looking to implement RL and CE, to help prioritize where to invest company resources to generate prime difference. Furthermore, this study also identified Industry 4.0 technologies, which would tackle top identified critical success factors within the hierarchical model such as block chain and digital platforms.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by exploring the connection between RL and CE in the context of Industry 4.0 that determines the critical success factors enabling sustainable inter-firm collaboration.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 April 2018

HadjMostefa Khelladi, Djamil Krouf and Nawal Taleb-Dida

This paper aims to study the effect of green lemon zest combined with sardine proteins in diabetic hypertensive rats (DHRs).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the effect of green lemon zest combined with sardine proteins in diabetic hypertensive rats (DHRs).

Design/methodology/approach

Male Wistar rats (n = 30) weighing 250 ± 10 g were divided into five groups. The first group consumed a diet containing 20 per cent casein (C). The other four groups are rendered diabetic by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (40 mg/kg body weight), then hypertensive by subcutaneous implantation controlled time-release pellet containing ouabain (0.25 mg/pellet). One untreated group (DHR) consumed 20 per cent casein and the three other groups consumed the same diet supplemented with 2 per cent green lemon zest (DHR-lz), or with 20 per cent of sardine protein (group DHR-sp) or with the combination of both sardine proteins and green lemon zest (group DHR-sp + lz).

Findings

DHRs feeding on the combination of both sardine protein (sp) and lemon zest (lz) induced a significant decrease of diastolic blood pressure and heart rates values compared with DHR (p < 0.05). The HDLC values were increased by +55 per cent in DHR-sp + lz compared with DHR group. Moreover, plasma non-HDLC concentrations were decreased significantly compared to DHR, DHR-lz, DHR-sp and C groups. In DHR-sp + lzvs DHR group, TBARS values were decreased by −25 per cent in the liver. Moreover, kidney TBARS were significantly reduced by −66, −51, −65 and −67 per cent compared with C, DHR, DHR-lz and DHR-sp, respectively.

Originality/value

These results suggest that consumption of green lemon zest combined with sardine proteins can reduce blood pressure and tissue oxidative damage and, therefore, help to prevent cardiovascular complications in hypertensive diabetic patients.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Colin Bien and Coco Klußmann

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework that systematically captures the ambiguity of different understandings about science, the university and its relation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework that systematically captures the ambiguity of different understandings about science, the university and its relation to society, while conceptualising sustainability. Following Corley and Gioia (2004, p. 174) on identity ambiguity and change, it seems pivotal to better understanding the ambiguity of sustainability in relation to academic cultures and university models to manage the transition more effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

The nature of this paper’s objectives as well as the wide thematic scope leads to the need of exploring a broad knowledge base. This was best addressed by an exploratory literature review with data collection from primary and secondary sources. The data was interpreted through a hermeneutic analysis and resulted in the inductive development of first categories and goals (further referred to as category development). In addition, a multi-method approach further adjusted the categories and raised their empirical validity and social robustness.

Findings

Implementing sustainability involves dealing with a double bound ambiguity due to organisational and individual identity reasons. Five fields of ambiguity were developed to systemise the conceptualisation of a sustainable university along contradictory understandings of science, the university and sustainability. These fields offer a framework to qualitatively assess the degree of sustainability in higher education institutions. Arguments for and against sustainability in universities have been categorised around five criteria and associated to the fields of ambiguity. The finding indicates that meaning in organisational change management for sustainability can be considered both, a potential driver and barrier for a sustainability transition in universities.

Research limitations/implications

This paper exclusively focussed on the internal perspective and left aside any external factors that influence the sustainability transition, such as political measures to stimulate sustainability in higher education. In addition, the operational dimension of a sustainable university has been neglected, which is by all means a necessary and important aspect. The interrelation of the identified goals has not been discussed.

Originality/value

This paper focusses on the conceptualisation and understanding of sustainability within the institution, an often-forgotten but fundamental aspect of implementation. The fields of ambiguity are designed to be applied for assessing the “degree of maturity” of a sustainable university. The fields reveal the different understandings about the role, the mission and the governance of universities, stemming from competing preferences about goals and their assumed relations by various stakeholders of a higher education institutions. The five fields are not an attempt to resolve the hidden contradictions and tensions in a sustainability transition, but to state them clearly to anticipate resistances and conflicts that hinder the development of a shared understanding.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Gustavo Ferro and Ignacio Benito Amaro

Given the growing supply of wines and the large number of new consumers with purchasing power but lacking knowledge of the subtleties of high-quality wines, expert…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the growing supply of wines and the large number of new consumers with purchasing power but lacking knowledge of the subtleties of high-quality wines, expert opinions are used for consumers as proxies for quality. This study aims to determine the determinants of prices in top-quality wine market. The authors also seek to estimate the role for country of origin, grape, producing region and winery in prices. And, finally, the authors try to show how countries, regions and wineries can help increase their position in international rankings.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors try to answer: What factors explain the price of top-quality wines (defined as best rated in a standardized ranking)? To some extent, in the hands of producers influence prices, which imply long-term decisions or large investments in land and marketing. Other variables that consumer value does affect prices. The authors try also to detect undervalued or overvalued wines, grapes, regions, wineries or producer countries. The authors estimate an econometric model of hedonic prices using a 14-year sample of the Wine Spectator’s 100 top-rated wines for the American market between 2003 and 2016, totaling 1,400 observations. The sample is a great cross-section because each wine is unique.

Findings

The authors’ contribution is twofold: the determination of the price explanatory values and the identification and attribution of price differences by country, grape, region and winery. Also, the authors detected grapes, countries, regions and wineries which are overvalued or undervalued with respect to the average prediction of the model.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are useful to understand the role of price explanatory variables, as well as for making policy and managerial decisions. From the model, collective or managerial actions can be derived to increase particular wines’ positions in international rankings. The proxy for “quality” in the study is not the only possible definition.

Practical implications

In some cases, managerial choices could be conditioned by the policies or history. There is some room for collective action and public policies to improve regions’ and countries’ reputation.

Social implications

There are clear synergies for policies that can raise the prestige of countries and regions and their spillovers on the brand name reputation of individual wineries.

Originality/value

The results, policy and managerial implications are of interest for business, countries interested in improving their position in international rankings and for consumers to make more informed decisions.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8