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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Marc Conrad, Tim French, Carsten Maple and Sijing Zhang

In this paper we present an account of an undergraduate team‐based assignment designed to facilitate, exhibit and record team‐working skills in an e‐mediated environment…

Abstract

In this paper we present an account of an undergraduate team‐based assignment designed to facilitate, exhibit and record team‐working skills in an e‐mediated environment. By linking the student feedback received to Hofstede’s classic model of cultural dimensions we aim to show the assignment’s suitability in revealing the student’s multi‐cultural context. In addition to anecdotal evidence we also present a quantitative analysis that shows that the desired learning outcomes have been met. In a further discussion we show how the qualitative data collected can be used to quantitatively determine a cultural fingerprint of the groups that is useful to predict the team’s suitability for a given task in a real‐world project.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Hussein Shaaban and Marc Conrad

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of culture on information security in a developing country's view.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of culture on information security in a developing country's view.

Design/methodology/approach

Two questionnaires adopted from the GLOBE project and OCAI were used to collect quantitative data on national and organisational culture. Also, a face to face semi‐structured interview was used to get insight into deep‐rooted issues concerning information security in the study environment. In addition, a previous study was used to find correlation of the data in this study.

Findings

The findings show that national culture has more influence than organisation culture on information security. We find that the dimensions that influence information security are Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, In‐Group Collectivism, and Future Orientation.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted in a public sector environment with employees thereby limiting external validity. Also, the population of the survey was small to make a generalisation of the findings. Also, the length of the questionnaire and complexity of questions put off many potential respondents.

Practical implications

Culture has impact on information security implementation and therefore the results imply that some consideration should be given when implementing information security models.

Originality/value

This study is important because it empirically correlates information security with cultural dimensions in a developing country's environment.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Mortaza Kokabi

Discusses some of the problems associated with the requirements and the prospects for international standards for the exchange of bibliographic records in machine‐readable…

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545

Abstract

Discusses some of the problems associated with the requirements and the prospects for international standards for the exchange of bibliographic records in machine‐readable form: the various roles of national bibliographies and national libraries; a lack of international cataloging standards; a lack of an international subject control system; language difficulties; character sets and codes; and nonroman alphabets. Explains that these problems lie behind the development of various MARC formats out of UNIMARC. In this final part of a four‐part article, describes the formats for South Africa, Taiwan, Japan, Croatia and Germany and indicates the points of difference and local requirements.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Abstract

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Mortaza Kokabi

Surveys the evolution and development of various MARC formats out of UKMARC. Describes the formats for Australia, Thailand, Italy and Singapore and indicates their main…

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370

Abstract

Surveys the evolution and development of various MARC formats out of UKMARC. Describes the formats for Australia, Thailand, Italy and Singapore and indicates their main points of difference and local requirements.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Saztec Europe forms new division. Saztec Europe has formed a new division which will specifically concentrate on marketing its services to European libraries. Chris Dowd…

Abstract

Saztec Europe forms new division. Saztec Europe has formed a new division which will specifically concentrate on marketing its services to European libraries. Chris Dowd and Glenda Rousseau, who have 30 years of bibliographic services experience between them, head a team of 10 specialists in London and Scotland. Detailed knowledge and experience in multilingual database creation are claimed. Talks are currently taking place with European national libraries on the prospects for further work of this kind. Conrad Lealand, Managing Director of Saztec Europe, said he believed a number of major catalogue conversions would take place during the next four years.

Details

Online Review, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

David Conrad, Amit Ghosh and Marc Isaacson

Motivation is a widely explored topic and numerous studies have been done to determine motivation importance and implementation. However, no studies have been identified…

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12003

Abstract

Purpose

Motivation is a widely explored topic and numerous studies have been done to determine motivation importance and implementation. However, no studies have been identified that investigate what motivators are most important to physicians and if physician leaders agree with the importance physicians place on specific motivational aspects. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this missed management learning opportunity.

Design/methodology/approach

A fully inclusive sampling of all (n=2,547) public-practice physicians and physician leaders (clinic and hospital employed, non-private practice) in Minneapolis and St. Paul Minnesota was conducted in the summer and fall of 2013. The surveys were sent in a link via a web survey software program by the study researchers. The surveys were anonymous and minimally intrusive, asking only for perspectives regarding the most important motivational elements by physicians and physician leaders.

Findings

Generally, the responses were surprisingly similar between physicians and physician leaders. The two statistically different motivators – interesting work and job security – were ranked as more important by physicians than the physician leaders. This suggests that leaders should be more attentive to ensuring variety, challenge, and engagement is an active part of the physicians’ work. This also suggests that managers should emphasize and reinforce the fact that – if it is the case – jobs are secure and that staffing stability is a key goal for management. As Kovach (1987) suggests, as employees’ income increases, money becomes less of a motivator and as employees get older, interesting work becomes more of a motivator.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions and generalizations can be made about the population sampled.

Practical implications

The two statistically different motivators – interesting work and job security – were ranked as more important by physicians than the physician leaders. This suggests that leaders should be more attentive to ensuring variety, challenge, and engagement is an active part of the physicians’ work. This also suggests that managers should emphasize and reinforce the fact that – if it is the case – jobs are secure and that staffing stability is a key goal for management.

Social implications

As this study reveals, physicians have clear preferences when it comes to workplace motivation. It is not unreasonable then to determine that the more satisfied the employee, the better he or she will perform. Accordingly, the environment that managers create for their employees must be one that is constructive to positive energy. If employees feel happy when they are working, then they will be naturally encouraged to work, thus producing improved quality healthcare for patients.

Originality/value

What are the most important motivators for physicians and do physician leaders understand what motivators are to enhance physician productivity, well-being, and morale? Answers to this question may be beneficial to designing leadership education that enhances the understanding of the impact effectively identified and effectively applied motivation techniques may have on employee behavior and attitudes. Insights will also benefit the design of motivational structures and methods in the healthcare workplace.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

Mortaza Kokabi

Among the problems associated with the requirements and theprospects for international standards for the exchange of bibliographicrecords in machine‐readable form are the…

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381

Abstract

Among the problems associated with the requirements and the prospects for international standards for the exchange of bibliographic records in machine‐readable form are the various roles of national bibliographies and national libraries; a lack of international cataloguing standards; a lack of an international subject control system; language difficulties; character sets and codes; and non‐roman alphabets. These problems lie behind the development of various MARC formats out of UNIMARC. In this final part of a four‐part article describes the formats for South Africa, Taiwan, Japan, Croatia and Germany and indicates the points of difference and local requirements.

Details

Library Review, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

David J. Hutson

In the contemporary US, pregnant women must navigate competing ideas about their bodies, including expectations for weight gain. Given that there are few social spaces…

Abstract

In the contemporary US, pregnant women must navigate competing ideas about their bodies, including expectations for weight gain. Given that there are few social spaces where women may gain weight without disapproval, pregnancy represents a period when women are allowed to put on weight. However, gaining weight means doing so within the context of the obesity “epidemic” and increased medical surveillance of the body. To explore how women navigate the medicalization of pregnancy weight, I draw on data from in-depth interviews with 40 pregnant and recently pregnant women. Findings indicate that women reframe the meaning of pregnancy weight as “baby weight,” rather than body weight. This allows them to view it as a temporary condition that is “for the baby,” while holding two concurrent body images – a pregnant and a non-pregnant version of themselves. Women also resist the quantification of their maternity weight, either by not keeping track or not looking at scales in the doctor’s office. Doing so prevented baby weight from turning back into body weight – a concrete and meaningful number on the scale. Such resistance to quantification is often accomplished with the help of doctors and healthcare professionals who do not explicitly discuss weight gain with their patients. These findings suggest that women rely on a variety of strategies to navigate the medicalization of pregnancy weight, and provides another lens through which to understand how and why women may make similar choices about other medicalized aspects of their pregnancy (or pregnancy experiences).

Details

Reproduction, Health, and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-172-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Joanne Li and James S. Ang

Outlines the role of directors and previous research on their selection, reputation, relationship to firm performance and multiple directorships, noting criticism of those…

Abstract

Outlines the role of directors and previous research on their selection, reputation, relationship to firm performance and multiple directorships, noting criticism of those who sit on many boards. Develops hypothese on the value directors provide through their time and expertise and tests them on a sample of 121 US firms being targeted for takeover 1989‐1993 to explore the link between pre‐offer and post‐offer firm performance and the number of directorships held by their directors. Presents the results, which suggest that directors with less time (i.e. more directorships) do not necessarily provide worse routine monitoring or lead to lower merger premiums. Recognizes some other factors affecting interpretation and calls for further research.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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