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Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2014

Wiremu Doherty

This chapter examines mātauranga Māori (Māori ways of knowing) and Iwi (tribes and sub-tribes) mātauranga (knowledge) described as mātauranga-a-iwi (tribal knowledge). It…

Abstract

This chapter examines mātauranga Māori (Māori ways of knowing) and Iwi (tribes and sub-tribes) mātauranga (knowledge) described as mātauranga-a-iwi (tribal knowledge). It presents an argument that mātauranga Māori and mātauranga-a-iwi must be linked to a particular context, drawing out the ideas that space and place are important. This theoretical chapter through Kaupapa Māori (a Māori way) identifies a series of key concepts that set the parameters for a discussion of the relationships between mātauranga-a-iwi, mātauranga Māori and Kaupapa Māori theory. I argue that mātauranga Māori, Kaupapa Māori theory and mātauranga-a-iwi are distinct entities but inseparable. This chapter charts the relationships among these three entities in a diagrammatic form, in what I have termed the Ranga Framework. The Ranga Framework proposes the working relationship between these elements that links space and place to people to produce contextual knowledge. By making the appropriate linkages to produce contextual knowledge Māori are able to locate themselves cognitively into the learning environment. I argue this is an important element that will help lift the educational success of Māori. It is important to ensure that contextual connections are a critical component in the delivery of knowledge, without which/otherwise Māori learners are in danger of reproaching mutant forms of language and knowledge, and thereby becoming disconnected from a more-authentic Iwi base. This chapter proposes an indigenous cognitive development framework to map engagement with new concepts and the stages required to reach mastery.

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Māori and Pasifika Higher Education Horizons
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-703-0

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Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2014

Rosina Taniwha

Wānanga are Indigenous educational institutions that encompass a diverse approach to education. Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi, an ‘Indigenous University’, is an…

Abstract

Wānanga are Indigenous educational institutions that encompass a diverse approach to education. Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi, an ‘Indigenous University’, is an environment where innovative thinking and culturally based teaching practice enhances student experiences in an Indigenous Māori environment. It is in this space that Māori ideology and epistemology are practiced and viewed as normal. This diverse environment accepts without qualification that education and knowledge will be provided to the highest level through an Indigenous Māori lens. Culturally responsive environments are conducive to learning experiences for Indigenous Māori students. Pedagogy that is underpinned by cultural values and philosophy enhances the reciprocal learning experiences that are shared between lecturer and student. A positive learning environment promotes a distributive action, where the student experience is further shared with whānau (family), hapū (sub-tribe), Iwi (tribe) and communities in which they interact and engage.

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Māori and Pasifika Higher Education Horizons
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-703-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1973

JOHN M. BARRINGTON and JOHN L. EWING

Decisions on changes in administration are as old as recorded history if we may judge from the example to be found in Exodus in which Jethro persuaded Moses to delegate…

Abstract

Decisions on changes in administration are as old as recorded history if we may judge from the example to be found in Exodus in which Jethro persuaded Moses to delegate some of his responsibilities so that he would not “wear away”. But the study of such decisions with the idea of deriving principles which may conceivably guide the behaviour of administrators is comparatively recent. For the student of educational administration a case study of the events and influences surrounding a particular administrative act, which can be examined and discussed, so that the springs of action are defined and assessed, offers material for such study. With these thoughts in mind, the authors of this paper have analysed the circumstances that led to the governmental decision to transfer the administrative control of the separate group of Maori primary schools in New Zealand from the central Department of Education to the regional education boards. The mode of decision also raises questions and issues that may be instructive in the study of administrative change.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Spencer Lilley

This paper aims to provide an introduction to Māori, the indigenous people of New Zealand, briefly describing their origin, population structure, language and knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an introduction to Māori, the indigenous people of New Zealand, briefly describing their origin, population structure, language and knowledge structures. There is also a description of the process by which Māori knowledge systems were transformed into a written structure from predominantly oral and visual forms. In the latter part of the paper, there is a discussion about how the growing demand by Māori clients changed the delivery of resources and services in New Zealand libraries and led to the development of Māori collections in libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach this paper outlines the impact that literacy and publishing had on Māori traditional knowledge transfer methods. The implication of these developments and their importance to libraries is considered as part of the Treaty of Waitangi reconciliation process and the growing consciousness of the need to be fulfilling the information needs of Māori clients.

Findings

The development of Māori collection has been successful and plays a critical role in meeting the cultural, linguistic, research and recreational information needs of Māori clients.

Research limitations/implications

This case study provides a model for the development of indigenous collections in other countries.

Originality/value

This paper makes a contribution to an area that has not had a significant amount of literature published on it.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Brett Parker

The extent of Internet access is a key indicator of the Maori people’s ability to use information technologies for social, e‐commerce and e‐government communication. The…

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Abstract

The extent of Internet access is a key indicator of the Maori people’s ability to use information technologies for social, e‐commerce and e‐government communication. The key findings from national surveys of Internet use during 2000 and 2001, together with census data, provide an indication of Internet access amongst Maori. The results show there is a substantial “digital divide” between Maori and other New Zealanders, in terms of access to the Internet and employment in information technology industries. This “divide” is likely to be due to the lower household incomes and educational outcomes of Maori adults. While Maori currently do not have the same level of access to information technology as non‐Maori, the growth in their participation has nonetheless been rapid.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Patty McNicholas

This paper aims to provide a debate piece on recent approaches to Maori development and the participation of Maori in the accountancy profession.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a debate piece on recent approaches to Maori development and the participation of Maori in the accountancy profession.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers the relationship between “accounting”, “accountability” and cultural identity for those Maori wanting a career in accountancy.

Findings

The paper finds that, while Maori accountants have made some progress as members of the profession, they remain statistically unfavoured in terms of participation.

Originality/value

The paper raises challenging questions about whether the profession should provide Maori accountants with the opportunity to develop approaches based on their own priorities and culture to assist in building the capacity and capability of Maori organisations and Maori accountants as service professionals, thereby making a valuable contribution to Maori development.

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Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Chris Szekely and Sally Weatherall

Provides a brief historical background on why libraries are relevant to Maori. Discusses some of the factors and issues relating to developing Maori collections. Profiles…

1003

Abstract

Provides a brief historical background on why libraries are relevant to Maori. Discusses some of the factors and issues relating to developing Maori collections. Profiles a selection of libraries with Maori collections.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Marama Muru-Lanning

In 2012, I wrote an article titled ‘Māori research collaborations, Mātauranga Māori science, and the appropriation of water in New Zealand’.1 The article attempted to…

Abstract

In 2012, I wrote an article titled ‘Māori research collaborations, Mātauranga Māori science, and the appropriation of water in New Zealand’.1 The article attempted to critique Vision Mātauranga (VM)2 policy by examining the relationship between Ngā Pae ō te Māramatanga,3 Ngāi Tahu iwi (tribe) and scientists with interests in freshwater. Seven years on, I admit to having barely scratched the surface regarding the multiple ways the policy is used as a mechanism to advance and create relationships between scientists and Māori communities in the co-production of new knowledge. Back then my commentary was somewhat sceptical of the policy’s design which does not deal with the unequal power relationships created between science experts and flax-root communities. I argued that VM had been created to commodify and globalise Māori knowledge that belongs to Māori communities and had become the expected mechanism for all engagement between university researchers and Māori communities. Much of the risk associated with forming new collaborations rested with Māori communities, and even more so with the Māori researchers who act as intermediaries and brokers between the communities and research teams. Back then, as a scholar trained in social anthropology, the way I understood knowledge transmission and the research part of my world was disconnected from the rest of my life. The probing and critical perspectives I had developed by privileging anthropological ideas and theory overshadowed other ways of interacting and understanding people and place. Like many of my anthropological colleagues I had learnt to be an ‘objective’ participant observer. The aim of participant observation is to gain a close and intimate familiarity with a given group of individuals through intensive involvement with people in their cultural environment, usually over an extended period of time. This method is highly regarded by social and cultural anthropologists around the globe. Now as the Director of a Māori research centre, I am expected to participate in all manner of engagements with Māori and non-Māori groups, and I am constantly confronted by ethical questions when undertaking research projects. VM as a process forces me to ask questions that I never did when I was trying my hand at being a bona fide anthropologist. The questions that shape my scholarship now are as follows: Who will benefit from this research and what will my legacy be?

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Indigenous Research Ethics: Claiming Research Sovereignty Beyond Deficit and the Colonial Legacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-390-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Ann Sullivan and Valmaine Toki

In February 1840, Māori co-signed the Treaty of Waitangi with the British Crown. Partnership, protection, and participation are the fundamental principles provided in the…

Abstract

In February 1840, Māori co-signed the Treaty of Waitangi with the British Crown. Partnership, protection, and participation are the fundamental principles provided in the Treaty. In April 2010, the New Zealand government endorsed the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. These two instruments provide indigenous peoples with the right to participate fully in decision-making that will affect their legal, social, economic, cultural, and political rights. Having endorsed the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the New Zealand government is morally obliged to comply with the intent of the Declaration. The focus of this chapter is on the right of Māori to participate and be represented on the governing councils of local government. It will be demonstrated that the refusal by the New Zealand government in 2010 to provide dedicated Māori wards on the Auckland Council is contrary to the intent of the Declaration. The principles of the Treaty of Waitangi require the government to act with integrity toward the indigenous people of New Zealand. It will be argued that the failure of local government to utilize electoral options that will enhance Māori representation in local government breach obligations inherent in both the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Treaty of Waitangi.

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Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-622-5

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2003

Howard H Frederick and Ella Henry

Polynesian settlers arrived in Aotearoa (in te reo, or Māori language, “Land of the Long White Cloud”) about the 10th century. Aotearoa was visited briefly by the Dutch…

Abstract

Polynesian settlers arrived in Aotearoa (in te reo, or Māori language, “Land of the Long White Cloud”) about the 10th century. Aotearoa was visited briefly by the Dutch navigator Abel Tasman in 1642. However, it was not until 1769 that the British naval captain James Cook and his crew became the first Europeans to explore New Zealand’s coastline thoroughly. The word Māori meant “usual or ordinary” as opposed to the “different” European settlers. Before the arrival of Europeans, Māori, or indigenous Polynesian inhabitants of New Zealand, had no name for themselves as a nation, only a number of tribal names. The original meaning of Pākeha, the settlers, was a person from England. With time, Pākeha became the word to describe fair-skinned people born in New Zealand. We use the word Pākeha here in the sense of the New Zealand census as a European New Zealander.

Details

Ethnic Entrepreneurship: Structure and Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-220-7

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