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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Robert E. Looney

The cornerstone of the government’s adjustment program is to increase the efficiency of private investment and activity by deregulating the economy and promoting…

Abstract

The cornerstone of the government’s adjustment program is to increase the efficiency of private investment and activity by deregulating the economy and promoting competition. The counterpart of this fundamental strategy is the need to increase the effectiveness of the public sector which in Pakistan had become overextended. To this end, public sector resources and management capacity are being redirected and concentrated in those areas in which public sector intervention is required because of market failures or social objectives. The results obtained strongly suggest that the government’s program is supported by strong empirical evidence. There is no question that private investment has been discouraged by the public capital formation in manufacturing. Not only has government investment in this area stifled the private sector, but also it has diverted funds away from productive activities that would most likely have encouraged a follow‐on expansion in private investment.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Prakash J. Singh, Mei Feng and Alan Smith

While manufacturing organisations were early adopters of ISO 9000, lately, many service sector organisations have also pursued adoption. The aim of this paper is to…

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2951

Abstract

Purpose

While manufacturing organisations were early adopters of ISO 9000, lately, many service sector organisations have also pursued adoption. The aim of this paper is to compare the experiences with the standard of the two sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

The research collected data from 149 service and 160 manufacturing organisations using a common survey measurement instrument.

Findings

Results show that there are no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of time and cost of obtaining registration. Also, there are only small points of differences in motivation for registration and difficulties faced. There are greater differences between the groups in terms of benefits gained and management practices associated with the standard.

Originality/value

These results provide interesting insights into how the two groups perceive and engage with the standard, how cross‐industry diffusion could be taking place, and the veracity of the claims made about the universal applicability of the standard. These findings imply that service organisations can learn from the experiences of the manufacturing sector, but copying carte blanche the implementation strategies is fraught with risks. Further, the standard is not universally applicable and may need industry‐specific tailoring.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Nedelyn Magtibay‐Ramos, Gemma Esther Estrada and Jesus Felipe

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the degree of structural change of the Philippine economy and examine how linkages among sectors evolved during 1979‐2000.

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1662

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the degree of structural change of the Philippine economy and examine how linkages among sectors evolved during 1979‐2000.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the input‐output tables of the Philippines to draw the economic landscape of the Philippines and to examine the degree of structural transformation that the economy has undergone since the 1970s. They perform a linkage analysis of 11 major economic sectors and through the multiplier product matrix, plot the economic landscape of the Philippines for 1979‐2000. This allows identification of the sectors that have exhibited the highest intersectoral linkages. The authors also undertake a more disaggregated analysis within manufacturing and consider export sophistication and competitiveness.

Findings

Manufacturing is consistently the key sector of the Philippine economy. Resource and scale‐intensive manufacturing industries exhibit the highest linkages. The authors also find a growing impact on the economy of private services and transportation, communication and storage sectors, probably due to the globalization of these activities. But overall, compared to manufacturing, the service sector exhibits lower intersectoral linkages.

Originality/value

The economic landscape of the Philippines shows the structural changes that have taken place. The empirical findings lead to the conclusion that the Philippines cannot afford to leapfrog the industrialization stage and depend solely on a service‐oriented economy, when the potential for growth still lies primarily on manufacturing. The results of this study can be used for government policy formulation. The government should institute policy reforms that directly target the industrial sector to accelerate economic growth.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

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53910

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 August 2020

Chukwuebuka Bernard Azolibe

This study empirically assessed the influence of foreign direct investment on the manufacturing sector growth in the Middle East and North African region using panel data…

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1176

Abstract

Purpose

This study empirically assessed the influence of foreign direct investment on the manufacturing sector growth in the Middle East and North African region using panel data of 18 countries covering the period of 1975–2017.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed Levin et al. (2002) test (LLC) and Im et al. (2003) panel unit root test. Furthermore, Kao’s cointegration test was applied to examine the long-run relationship between the variables. Both the Dynamic OLS and Fully modified OLS were used in estimating the short-run relationship.

Findings

The results of the DOLS and FMOLS indicate that both inward and outward FDI influence the manufacturing sector growth positively. This shows that much of the manufacturing sector growth in the MENA region is driven by both inward and outward FDI. Our findings made a strong new proposition that aside from the negative influence proposed by Stevens and Lipsey (1992), outward FDI could also have a positive influence on the manufacturing sector of a country through effective utilization of domestic raw materials that are produced locally for production of goods in a foreign country.

Practical implications

MENA countries should concentrate more on making policies that will encourage the effective utilization of domestic resources for outward foreign direct investment in other countries of the world as it has the capacity to boost the manufacturing sector growth. Also, policies that will attract more inflows of FDI in the region should be encouraged. Both inward and outward FDI should be considered as an integral part of MENA economic policy in order to spur the manufacturing sector growth.

Originality/value

Previous empirical studies on the relationship between FDI and manufacturing sector growth have focused much on the influence of inward FDI. Thus, very little attention has been paid to the contribution that the outward FDI makes to the growth of the manufacturing sector of the host country. Our empirical study focused on the influence of both inward and outward FDI on the manufacturing sector growth with specific emphasis on the MENA region that remains the center of attraction of inward FDI and a source of inward FDI to most nonoil producing developing and developed countries given the oil-rich nature of the region.

Details

International Trade, Politics and Development, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2586-3932

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Saumyaranjan Sahoo

The purpose of this paper is to provide sector-specific empirical evidence on the comparative evaluation of total productive maintenance (TPM) and total quality management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide sector-specific empirical evidence on the comparative evaluation of total productive maintenance (TPM) and total quality management (TQM) approaches, implemented exclusively and collectively on improving manufacturing business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a multi-sector analysis framework to comparatively assess the synergistic and standalone effect of TPM and TQM improvement approaches. A total of 231 manufacturing organizations from food and beverages, textiles and electrical and electronics sectors have been extensively surveyed. These firms were further clustered into TPM focus, TQM focus and integrated TPM×TQM on the basis of their primary manufacturing strategy. Comparative assessment of these three manufacturing approaches has been evaluated using t-test statistics.

Findings

This paper highlights that adoption of integrated TPM×TQM approach is beneficial for food and beverages and electrical and electronics sectors. However, this supposition is rejected for firms operating in the textile sector.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this research are still exploratory. Future research using countrywide and cross-country approach can be undertaken to statistically generalize the findings of the present research. In-depth case studies are needed to further validate the findings of the study empirically.

Practical implications

The result of this study help managers and practitioners to make manufacturing strategic decision based on the nature of their operating business sector regarding adoption of TPM and TQM practices, which will further revive their firm’s competitiveness.

Originality/value

Every operating sector embraces a diversity of manufacturing activities based upon their competing priorities. This paper makes an attempt to present a multi-sectoral evaluation of joint implementation and effect of manufacturing programs.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2019

Arvind Upadhyay, Shaheda Akter, Lindsay Adams, Vikas Kumar and Nikhil Varma

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of the different circular business models (CBMs) in the manufacturing and service sector and apply this in the context…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of the different circular business models (CBMs) in the manufacturing and service sector and apply this in the context of the food industry (FI), through a systematic literature review of related published journals and articles. The research study is designed to illustrate the impact of CBMs in the manufacturing and service sectors through a combination of real-life examples and direct references to existing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The underlying research study follows a systematic literature review approach where the relevant CBMs are explored in the context of the manufacturing and service sector (FI.) The journals most cited in the context of CBMs and their implication in the manufacturing and service sector were chosen for this study. There was no fixed timeframe applied to complete the research. A total of 54 articles were selected which referenced: discussion in the context of the concept of CBMs; different types of CBM; definition of the manufacturing sector; definition of the service sector (FI); application of different CBMs in these two sectors; and included a comparison of the application of CBMs. In total, 40 of the 54 articles were shortlisted for best relevance and used in the research study.

Findings

The underlying research study was limited to 40 articles and the data contained within them. The article search was limited to the keywords of the CBM; the implication of CBM; the CBM in manufacturing (textiles); circular business in service (FI); and comparison and application of the CBM.

Practical implications

The final analysis demonstrates that circular business promotes sustainability by allowing companies to generate maximum return from given resources and reach zero waste targets. Greater customer satisfaction is also achieved through service innovation that cuts down negative impact on the environment. These findings are relevant and applicable to the FI.

Originality/value

A review of existing literature showed that whilst there is significant research on the implications of the CBM in general, there has been little focus on the use of different CBMs specifically in the manufacturing and service industry (FI). This research study is designed to tease out the specific benefits of CBMs in this context, highlighting the contribution they can make to efficiency in both the manufacturing and service sectors (FI) through useful comparison.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Atif Awad, Ishak Yussof and Norlin Khalid

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of migrant workers on the output growth of 15 sub-industries of the manufacturing sector in Malaysia during the period…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of migrant workers on the output growth of 15 sub-industries of the manufacturing sector in Malaysia during the period 1990–2008. The paper seeks to answer the following critical questions: what is the impact of migrant workers on the output growth of the manufacturing sector, the leading sector of Malaysian economy? It is possible that migrant workers with different skill levels may have different impacts on output growth of such sector?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs three econometric techniques: mean group, dynamic fixed effect and the pooled mean group on extended form for Cobb–Douglas production function.

Findings

The overall findings suggest that due to the inflow of low skills of migrant workers, output growth in the manufacturing sectors is likely to witnesses a marginal decline in the long run.

Originality/value

The present study complements previous studies by providing a quantitative assessment of the impact of migrant workers on output growth in the manufacturing sector in Malaysia, which is not attempted in extant literature. More importantly, the analysis considers the probability that migrant workers with different skill levels may have different impacts on the growth of output in the manufacturing sector.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Carolina Troncoso Baltar, Celio Hiratuka and Gilberto Tadeu Lima

– The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of the real exchange rate on investment in the Brazilian manufacturing industry.

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1560

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of the real exchange rate on investment in the Brazilian manufacturing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop an investment model that considers the effect of changes in the real exchange rate, taking into account that the effect of the real exchange rate on the Brazilian manufacturing investment operates through demand and cost channels. The composition of these effects varies across manufacturing sectors, with different repercussions on investment decisions, depending on sectoral characteristics. A panel data analysis is applied to estimate the model for the Brazilian manufacturing sectors from 1996 to 2010.

Findings

One main result is that the responsiveness of the Brazilian manufacturing investment to real exchange rate varies considerably across manufacturing sectors. Overall, the results contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between exchange rate dynamics, manufacturing investment and industrial development, thus unveiling important empirical elements for the debate on industrial policies to stimulate manufacturing investment and production.

Originality/value

As the (scant) empirical literature on real exchange rate and investment in Brazil has invariably been using aggregate data, this paper contributes to the literature by obtaining sectoral estimates of the responsiveness of manufacturing investment to exchange rate fluctuations that further the understanding of the complex relationship between these economic variables.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Shromona Ganguly

This article analyses the structural change in microenterprises located at India's unorganised manufacturing sector in terms of output mix, choice of technique and…

Abstract

Purpose

This article analyses the structural change in microenterprises located at India's unorganised manufacturing sector in terms of output mix, choice of technique and productivity during the last few decades.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on data collected from a quinquennial survey of unorganised firms, this study attempts productivity analysis by using the growth accounting technique.

Findings

The paper finds that there is a significant structural change which has occurred in the small firm sector in Indian manufacturing. The share of capital-intensive industries has increased substantially in recent years. Further, though small firms are more labour intensive, the labour productivity and total productivity of these firms are very low. The falling labour productivity and rising capital intensity indicates replacement of labour with capital in Indian small firm sector.

Practical implications

Low productivity of the sector is a cause for concern and this needs to be addressed by making the sector more competitive in the world market. To achieve this, policies should be designed so that small firms reach the efficient scale of production.

Originality/value

This is the first paper which examines structural changes in the Indian MSME sector. The findings have strong implications for creation of a viable ecosystem of entrepreneurship in the country.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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