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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Choon Hee Ong, You Ying Koo, Owee Kowang Tan and Chin Fei Goh

This paper aims to examine the role of rational culture in the relationship between lean manufacturing practices and operational productivity in the machinery and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role of rational culture in the relationship between lean manufacturing practices and operational productivity in the machinery and equipment industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a cross-sectional quantitative approach to conduct the research. Using an online survey questionnaire, 118 responses were collected. SPSS was used to assess validity, reliability and hypothesis testing of the study variables. Hierarchical regression analysis was employed to investigate the moderating effects of rational culture.

Findings

The study results reveal that quick setup and quality control were significantly related to operational productivity. Rational culture was a significant quasi-moderator.

Practical implications

This study highlights the importance of quick setup and quality control for machinery and equipment firms to gain higher operational productivity. Rational culture could be used to drive the firms toward greater achievements in this regard.

Originality/value

The use of rational culture as a quasi-moderator in the relationship between lean manufacturing practices and operational productivity is unprecedented. This study offers new findings by introducing the role of rational culture to enhance the effects of lean manufacturing practices on operational productivity.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Runong Xu, Yuming Wu and Yao Huang

Increasing carbon productivity is an effective way to reduce carbon emissions, while boosting economic prosperity. For appropriate formulating and enforcement of energy…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasing carbon productivity is an effective way to reduce carbon emissions, while boosting economic prosperity. For appropriate formulating and enforcement of energy saving and carbon emissions reduction policies in various sectors, it is of great significance to investigate the evolution characteristics and convergence modes of carbon productivity across the manufacturing sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using slack-based measure directional distance function (SBM-DDF) and global Malmquist–Luenberger (GML) productivity index, this paper measures the carbon productivities of 29 manufacturing subsectors in Shanghai, China, from 2001 to 2016 under the total factor framework. Furthermore, based on the convergence theories, it empirically examines the convergence of carbon productivity across these manufacturing sectors.

Findings

The measurement results suggest that the carbon productivities of the manufacturing sectors in Shanghai show an increasing tendency on the whole, and technical efficiency instead of technological change makes a main contribution to the increase. It is found that there is no obvious σ convergence across the manufacturing sectors in Shanghai, but there exist both absolute ß convergence and conditional ß convergence. Moreover, there is heterogeneity in convergence characteristics between the clean sectors and polluting sectors. The findings also show that firm size and industry structure have significant positive impacts on the growth of carbon productivities of the manufacturing sectors, whereas the impacts of capital deepening and energy consumption structure are significantly negative.

Originality/value

This paper measures the carbon productivities of the manufacturing subsectors by applying SBM-DDF and GML index, so as to improve the accuracy. It provides an insight into the convergence of carbon productivity across the manufacturing sectors.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Steven Hutton and Stephen Eldridge

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the productivity performance at the firm level from the perspective of manufacturing capability development at the process…

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1043

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the productivity performance at the firm level from the perspective of manufacturing capability development at the process level. Moreover, it reveals how alignment of manufacturing capabilities with market requirements has influenced a firm’s productivity over a period that includes the 2008 global recession.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework was derived from established theories and employed as part of a case study design encompassing a multiple methods research approach. The case of a UK SME was selected to reflect some of the issues associated with the wider productivity stagnation experienced by the UK economy in recent years.

Findings

The firm’s manufacturing strategy had become incrementally misaligned with market requirements due to external changes in its business environment. The complex relationships between capabilities such as quality, speed and cost were characterised. Realigning the firm’s manufacturing strategy to regain productivity performance required a range of prioritised actions including capital investment and changes in management practices concerning bottom-up process improvement and regular, top-down strategy review.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the case study cannot be generalised and the outcomes are specific to just one firm. However, the approach lends itself to replication, particularly within SMEs.

Originality/value

Prior studies have focussed on capability development at higher levels of abstraction. The study operationalized established theoretical perspectives at the firm level to derive context-based outcomes that can be used to improve manufacturing strategy alignment and productivity. Furthermore, the study contributes empirical evidence from the SME sector to the ongoing debate regarding the UK’s productivity puzzle.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 68 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Yingjie Shi, Xinyu Wang and Xuechang Zhu

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the effect of lean manufacturing on productivity changes and to identify the root sources of productivity changes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the effect of lean manufacturing on productivity changes and to identify the root sources of productivity changes. Furthermore, the authors explore the moderating effects of research and development (R&D) to examine the relationship between lean manufacturing and productivity changes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs the propensity score matching (PSM) model combined with the difference-in-difference (DID) estimation to overcome the selectivity bias. The Malmquist productivity index is used to capture productivity changes. By analyzing 671 Chinese manufacturing listed firms from 2009 to 2014, the moderating effects of R&D on the relationship between lean manufacturing and productivity changes are measured.

Findings

The results reveal that lean manufacturing implementation has non-significant effects on productivity changes in principle, while a detailed analysis indicates that lean manufacturing could improve scale efficiency significantly. While engaged in R&D could significantly improve the efficiency of technological changes for lean manufacturing implementation firms, there exist negative effects on pure technical efficiency.

Research limitations/implications

This research only covers manufacturing listed firms in China. Further studies should extend the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

This study helps managers to identify the important role of R&D on the relationship between lean manufacturing and productivity changes and provides insights into how to improve the lean manufacturing performance.

Originality/value

This paper appears to be one of the earliest studies on the relationship between lean manufacturing and productivity changes by applying the PSM combined with DID estimation in Chinese manufacturing environment.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2019

Bishwanath Goldar

The purpose of this paper is to analyse econometrically determinants of total factor productivity (TFP) in Indian manufacturing plants with a focus on the influence of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse econometrically determinants of total factor productivity (TFP) in Indian manufacturing plants with a focus on the influence of services input on productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

Plant-level data drawn from Annual Survey of Industries for the years 1998-1999 to 2012-2013 are used for the estimation of TFP at plant-level by applying the Levinsohn–Petrin methodology. Econometric models are estimated to explain variations in plant-level TFP. The explanatory variables used are services input intensity (split into manufacturing services purchased and other services), the share of information communication technology (ICT) assets in total fixed capital stock, the share of contract workers in total workers and the share of imported materials out of total materials used, with plant size taken as a control variable. Model estimation is done by applying the fixed effects model.

Findings

Econometric results indicate that services input and ICT intensity have a significant positive effect on productivity of manufacturing plants in India. Use of imported materials raises productivity, whereas the use of contract workers in place of regular workers tends to lower productivity. The impact of imported materials on TFP of manufacturing plants seems to be relatively bigger for labour-intensive, low technology industries.

Originality/value

Care has been taken for TFP measurement. Analysis of the impact of services input on TFP has been undertaken for Indian manufacturing using plant-level data for the first time.

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

M.I. Shahidul and S.T. Syed Shazali

This study is designed to examine the impact of favorable working environment (FWE) and R&D on manufacturing productivity of labor intensive industries. More specifically…

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1820

Abstract

Purpose

This study is designed to examine the impact of favorable working environment (FWE) and R&D on manufacturing productivity of labor intensive industries. More specifically, the purpose of this study is to generate quantitative evidence of the effect of FWE and R&D‐based manufacturing process on outputs and productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

Convenience sampling method has been used to conduct this study. This method provides the opportunity for selecting those manufacturing industries that are convenient to get access for collecting relevant information. Three categories of labor intensive manufacturing industries such as category A, B and C have been chosen to perform this research. Industrial category A represents the manufacturing operations which are based on skill of labor. Category B is a group of industries which provides the FWE the ability to utilize the potential of skill in the manufacturing process. However, category C is a specialized group of industries and its manufacturing process is dependent on R&D. The operating data of inputs cost and the revenue of corresponding outputs have been gathered from audited documents of the relevant sample industries and the data have been analyzed by using standard statistical techniques in order to establish the relationship between dependent and independent variables.

Findings

It is found that the industrial category B has spent about 1 percent of revenue on FWE and gained 9.5 percent higher productivity compare to industrial category A. However, the result has shown that the expenditure on FWE is positively associated with productivity (r<0.5). Whereas, the study has revealed that industrial category C has spent about 1.5 percent of revenue on R&D activities for improving manufacturing process and gained 20 higher productivity compare to industrial category A. Nevertheless, the expenditure on R&D is strongly correlated with productivity (r>0.7). The study concludes that FWE as proxy of job satisfaction of workforce and R&D on manufacturing process are value‐added inputs for labor intensive industries and it is positively associated with manufacturing productivity.

Originality/value

This paper presents three original case studies on labor intensive manufacturing industries. This study has addressed an important issue of labor intensive manufacturing industries and generated quantitative evidence of the impact of FWE and R&D activities on productivity. These issues have been well researched in developed and many developing countries in capital‐intensive industries, but no dedicated study is available that has addressed this issue from the perspective of the highly labor intensive industries such as the garment industry. The findings of this research would enrich the present knowledge stock of manufacturing systems. Eventually, the findings would be the basis for further research on manufacturing process for enhancing performance. Based on this concept, this study would be valuable to policy makers, academics and government agencies.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Kapil Deo Prasad, Sanjay Kumar Jha and Anand Prakash

This paper examines the ways in which the concepts of “quality”, “productivity” and “business performance” are dealt in the literature to exhibit that terms used within…

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4131

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the ways in which the concepts of “quality”, “productivity” and “business performance” are dealt in the literature to exhibit that terms used within these fields are vaguely defined and poorly understood. The purpose of this paper is to define quality, productivity and business performance along with their linkages for home-based brassware manufacturing units.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews related academic literature mostly since past ten years.

Findings

This paper clarifies meaning and linkages of quality, productivity and business performance in home-based brassware manufacturing units.

Research limitations/implications

The meaning and interpretations of quality, productivity and business performance may differ for other manufacturing units.

Practical implications

This paper highlights determinants of quality, productivity and business performance using key performance areas as applied explicitly for home-based brassware manufacturing units. The systems approach has been applied to understand productivity.

Originality/value

This paper creates terminologies that reduce the existing confusion with the field for applications in academia and brassware industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 64 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

R. Murugesh, S.R. Devadasan, P. Aravindan and R. Natarajan

Claims that failure to integrate productivity in total quality management (TQM) projects leads to ineffectiveness in management of manufacturing systems. Establishes a…

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1527

Abstract

Claims that failure to integrate productivity in total quality management (TQM) projects leads to ineffectiveness in management of manufacturing systems. Establishes a generalized manufacturing systems model based on the analysis of the results of literature and industrial surveys. Explores the need to adopt the strategic management approach to develop a productivity management model that could integrate with the existing successful quality management model. Identifies the conceptual and strategical elements of productivity and models them under the name “strategic productivity management” (SPM). Describes the pilot study carried out to validate SPM and explores the future direction of work.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Margaret A. Noble

Compares and contrasts the competitive priorities (manufacturing capabilities) of high‐ and low‐productivity firms, from the perspective of the cumulative model for…

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2283

Abstract

Compares and contrasts the competitive priorities (manufacturing capabilities) of high‐ and low‐productivity firms, from the perspective of the cumulative model for manufacturing competitiveness by using various statistical tests. Contends that the analysis of 561 firms worldwide demonstrates clearly differences in manufacturing strategy between the two productivity subsets, one of which is that better performing firms are the more likely to address multiple capabilities simultaneously; another is that these firms appear to have the more clearly defined competitive strategies. The high‐productivity firms are thus more supportive than are the low‐productivity firms of the cumulative model. Also discusses other findings.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Richard Grabowski

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact that slow growth in staple food productivity can have on the process of structural change and, more importantly, on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact that slow growth in staple food productivity can have on the process of structural change and, more importantly, on the development of labor intensive industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A theory of a semi-open economy is developed to analyze the role of staple food productivity on structural change. A case study is used to illustrate the workings of the model.

Findings

Slow growth in food staple productivity will mean that even when labor is physically abundant, it will not be economically cheap. Thus it will be extremely difficult to promote the expansion of labor intensive manufacturing. The key to rapid structural change is rapid growth in food staple productivity.

Practical implications

Investment in raising agricultural productivity is critical in the development of labor intensive manufacturing.

Social implications

Rapid growth can occur without leading to structural change. The bulk of the population remains locked in the rural sector.

Originality/value

The food sector is shown to be largely non-tradable. As a result solving the food problem domestically is crucial for structural change and economic development. Labor intensive manufacturing needs relatively cheap labor. For labor to be cheap, agricultural productivity (food staples) must rise rapidly.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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