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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Jurandir Peinado, Alexandre Reis Graeml and Fernando Vianna

The purpose of this paper is to assess the differences in importance assigned by manufacturing or service organizations to topics related to operations management and its…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the differences in importance assigned by manufacturing or service organizations to topics related to operations management and its attendant body of knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors did this by cataloguing and analyzing vacancy announcements related to operations management, presented by manufacturing and services companies in major Brazilian human resources websites.

Findings

The results show that manufacturing companies primarily hire personnel with skills in routine process management, quality management, lean manufacturing, ergonomics and work organization. Service companies generally seek professionals with knowledge and experience in logistics, supply chain management and project management.

Research limitations/implications

This study presents some limitations that reduce the power of its conclusions. There is some degree of subjectivity in the interpretation of the contents of the analyzed ads. In order to reduce this problem, the authors who did the tabulation of data marked the situations for which there were some doubts about the classification, discussing them with the other author, until they reached a consensus on the best way to classify each one.

Originality/value

The discussion about the importance assigned by manufacturing and service companies to the topics of operations management is crucial for not only the results obtained, but also to stimulate the debate on topics that comprise or should comprise the body of knowledge of operations management, and the way they are incorporated into business practice. This provides an additional opportunity to reflect on the potential of operations management in supporting business managers now and in the future.

Details

Revista de Gestão, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2177-8736

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Shahram Taj and Cristian Morosan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of lean operations practice and design on the Chinese manufacturing performance, using lean assessment data from 65…

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9945

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of lean operations practice and design on the Chinese manufacturing performance, using lean assessment data from 65 plants in various industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory factor and regression analyses are used to examine the associations among operations practice, production design, and operations performance. Three constructs are developed, two for operations practice (human resources and supply chains) and one for production design.

Findings

Factor analysis shows that three factors are sufficient to represent the lean performance dimensions of flow, flexibility, and quality. Regression analysis shows that the lean performance factors are strongly related to operations practice and production system design. Using lean factors and operations practice/design, our results indicate significant gaps in lean manufacturing practices among different industries, with the petroleum and hi‐tech industries performing relatively best. In addition, the garment industry performs very well in flexibility, indicating it does not compete just on price, but also on rapid response. Finally, all industries perform well in quality, underlining the emerging economy character of China. These results support other recent findings of the positive impact of lean operations on the performance of the Chinese manufacturing sector.

Research limitations/implications

The paper's findings, which are based on the experience of selected manufacturing plants in China, should not be interpreted as indicative of the characteristics of the Chinese manufacturing plants in general.

Originality/value

This paper advances the evidence on the role of lean manufacturing in two ways. First, to derive more robust statistical results, the paper relies on primary lean assessment data, as opposed to secondary opinion survey data common to most other studies. Second, to obtain more general findings, the paper makes use of a wider set of relevant variables, both for assessing manufacturing practice and performance, than is usual in the literature.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1992

Sin‐Hoon Hum and Lay‐Hong Leow

Seeks to contribute to the empirical database on the progression ofthinking with regards to the strategic role of manufacturing byreporting some results of a study on the…

Abstract

Seeks to contribute to the empirical database on the progression of thinking with regards to the strategic role of manufacturing by reporting some results of a study on the manufacturing‐strategy thinking and practices amongst practising managers of operations based in a newly industrialized economy (NIE). In particular, highlights the finding that while almost all operations managers in the sample perceive that manufacturing can and should contribute to overall corporate strategy, their view of the role of manufacturing is that it should primarily be reactive vis‐à‐vis other functional areas; such a view is far from strategic. Operations managers in the survey agree that there are many ways to compete besides cost, but their main criterion for evaluating the manufacturing function is still cost and productivity. They seem to fail to recognize the existence of tradeoffs in the production system. They acknowledge the necessity to handle strategic issues, but still perceive infrastructural decisions as mere operational decisions. While the role of managers in NIEs is likely to be more cost focused rather than strategic in orientation, they need to be better and further exposed to the current concepts of manufacturing strategy thinking and development. In particular, a more proactive form of the strategic role of manufacturing could be pursued.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Stanley E. Fawcett, Laura Birou and Barbara Cofield Taylor

The development of co‐ordinated global manufacturing is animportant approach to enhancing competitiveness. However, globalmanufacturing strategies provide the greatest…

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1847

Abstract

The development of co‐ordinated global manufacturing is an important approach to enhancing competitiveness. However, global manufacturing strategies provide the greatest competitive advantage when they are appropriately supported through key value‐added logistics and purchasing activities. Examines the relationship between global manufacturing and strategic advantage, emphasizing the need to establish adequate logistics and purchasing support. Presents a conceptual overview of the topic and reports the results of a survey‐based empirical study. Objectives are to examine the state of current logistics and purchasing practice as they relate to supporting the global network, and to evaluate the performance of these key activities as they support global operations.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Overview All organisations are, in one sense or another, involved in operations; an activity implying transformation or transfer. The major portion of the body of…

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2881

Abstract

Overview All organisations are, in one sense or another, involved in operations; an activity implying transformation or transfer. The major portion of the body of knowledge concerning operations relates to production in manufacturing industry but, increasingly, similar problems are to be found confronting managers in service industry. It is only in the last decade or so that new technology, involving, in particular, the computer, has encouraged an integrated view to be taken of the total business. This has led to greater recognition being given to the strategic potential of the operations function. In order to provide greater insight into operations a number of classifications have been proposed. One of these, which places operations into categories termed factory, job shop, mass service and professional service, is examined. The elements of operations management are introduced under the headings of product, plant, process, procedures and people.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

A.E. Coronado Mondragon, A.C. Lyons and D.F. Kehoe

In recent years there has been a shift towards the inclusion of agile processes in the development of manufacturing strategies. This work explores the agility of operations

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3545

Abstract

In recent years there has been a shift towards the inclusion of agile processes in the development of manufacturing strategies. This work explores the agility of operations in four SMEs in high‐tech manufacturing and the impact made by information systems to agile performance in those companies. The study demonstrated that information systems are relegated behind other enablers of agility. Although information systems are often used to support agility, information systems in themselves are not sufficient to achieve agility in business processes. Furthermore, the case studies demonstrate that companies rely upon non‐IT attributes to improve the agility of their manufacturing operations. The results of the study suggest that information systems play a more significant role for enhancing agility.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Sebastian Pashaei and Jan Olhager

The purpose of this paper is to explore how global operations of manufacturing companies influence the choice of product architecture decisions, ranging from integral to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how global operations of manufacturing companies influence the choice of product architecture decisions, ranging from integral to modular product designs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors perform a multiple-case study of three global manufacturing companies with integral and modular product architectures.

Findings

The authors find that the internal network capabilities, the number of capable plants, the focus of component plants, the focus of assembly plants, the distances from key suppliers to internal plants, and the number of market segments significantly influence the choice of integral vs modular architecture.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to three large manufacturing companies with global operations. However, the authors investigate both integral and modular products. The authors develop propositions that can be tested in further survey research.

Practical implications

The findings show that the type of global operations network influences the decision on product architecture, such that certain global operations characteristics support integral product designs, while other characteristics support modular designs.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge this paper is the first study on the explicit impact of global operations on product architecture, rather than the other way around.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Curtis P. McLaughlin, Ronald T. Pannesi and Narindar Kathuria

The manager who moves from manufacturing to services or theprofessor who wishes to research and teach service operations mustrecognise the key differences for developing…

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2729

Abstract

The manager who moves from manufacturing to services or the professor who wishes to research and teach service operations must recognise the key differences for developing an appropriate operations management strategy in a service business. For this process to be successful, the operations manager must participate assertively in the strategy debate. In manufacturing it is important that the functional strategy supports the corporate strategy in the marketplace and is co‐ordinated with other functional strategies. There is sufficient buffering between the manufacturing system and the customer that functional strategies can be developed within corporate strategies and then be co‐ordinated. In services, however, there are many issues where co‐ordination is not an adequate response. Virtually all strategic issues involving customer contact and front‐office operations must be the result of joint decision making involving marketing, operations, finance, and human resources. What little buffering there is occurs between the front office and the back room. This interface then becomes the locus for interfunctional co‐ordination on strategic issues. Consequently, planning for the front‐office operation differs in many ways from the manufacturing strategy development, while the back‐room strategy differs little from the manufacturing strategy model. This article outlines and contrasts the processes for both manufacturing and services, paralleling the models of Wheelwright and Hayes and Hill. The observed process differences have major implications for both teaching and research in service operations. The new and interesting issues are predominantly interfunctional and, given the intellectual backgrounds of the various functional areas, interdisciplinary.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

Steve Brown, Brian Squire and Kate Blackmon

The purpose of this paper is to explore links between the process of strategy formulation and subsequent performance in operations within firms.

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4893

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore links between the process of strategy formulation and subsequent performance in operations within firms.

Design/methodology/approach

An in‐depth literature review on resource‐based and operations strategy naturally led to three hypotheses. These are then tested using evidence from field‐based case studies of manufacturing/assembly plants in the computer industry.

Findings

The research suggests that world‐class plants incorporate both strategic operations content and strategic operations processes, whilst low‐performing plants do not.

Practical implications

It is argued that involving manufacturing/operations managers in the strategic planning process helps align manufacturing and business strategy, and this alignment is associated with higher manufacturing performance. This should be of interest to operations managers and strategists within firms.

Originality/value

By linking strategic alignment and the manufacturing strategy process to world‐class manufacturing practices and performance, this research adds a new dimension to the study of world‐class manufacturing and more generally to the best practices and practice‐performance debates.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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