Search results

1 – 8 of 8
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Manoj Kumar Paras and Antonela Curteza

The purpose of this study is to review the literature and practice of upcycling. In particular, the objective of this study is threefold: to comprehend the concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review the literature and practice of upcycling. In particular, the objective of this study is threefold: to comprehend the concept of upcycling and, subsequently, understanding the prominent terminologies used in the literature; to understand the process of upcycling and problem associated with it; and to review current literature and practice of upcycling for clothes.

Design/methodology/approach

A scientific literature review procedure proposed by Mayring (2002) was adopted to select and screen the paper that comprises the following steps: material collection, descriptive analysis and material evaluation.

Findings

Upcycling literature has witnessed significant contribution in the past one decade. The paper has identified various terminologies and definitions such as recycling, down-cycling, upcycling and redesign, which are used in the literature.

Research limitations/implications

The present study may help the scholars to understand the current state of literature. A practitioner of upcycling can use the findings to improve and standardise the existing process.

Originality/value

The process of redesigning is one of the important steps in upcycling, which comprises ideation, reconstruction and fitting. The limitation of redesigning is variability in size and pattern. This can be overcome through various techniques such as craftsmanship, time, innovation, provenance, desire and narrative.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Manoj Kumar Paras, Antonela Curteza and Geetika Varshneya

Undesired changes in the environment and reduction of natural resources have necessitated the need for environmental protection and resource conservation. Textile and…

Abstract

Purpose

Undesired changes in the environment and reduction of natural resources have necessitated the need for environmental protection and resource conservation. Textile and clothing industry is the second largest (after food) industry. Therefore, there is a need to protect the environment by reducing the use of natural resources. The purpose of this paper is to explore and identify the best reverse value chain alternatives for the clothing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory study is undertaken at six organizations working in the area of used clothes. The data were collected with the help of semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire, for the analytical hierarchy process analysis. The information from other sources such documents, websites, and reports was also gathered to strengthen the findings.

Findings

There are different reverse value chain methods to minimize the use of natural resources such as direct reuse, upcycling and downcycling. Incineration and landfill can be considered as the last options. The selection of best reverse value chain method is a multi-criteria value decision-making problem, as this involves complex decision parameters.

Practical implications

The industry practitioners can use the above model and results to make end-of-life decisions.

Originality/value

This paper develops a model on the basis of the analytic hierarchy process to determine the best method to close the loop of the clothing value chain. On the basis of the result and analysis, upcycling emerged to be the best alternative to close the loop of the clothing industry.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Rudrajeet Pal, Erik Sandberg and Manoj Kumar Paras

This paper aims to purport deeper understanding of, and instigate theoretical elaboration to, multidimensional value created through different reverse supply chain (RSC…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to purport deeper understanding of, and instigate theoretical elaboration to, multidimensional value created through different reverse supply chain (RSC) relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

By capturing the relationships (and their differences) constituted and embedded in three “extreme” case studies from global used clothing supply chain, the sources of multidimensional values are explored in line with Dyer and Singh’s (1998) relational theory.

Findings

In the RSC, when downstream relationships are typically more opportunistic, value is created using inter-personal ways of knowledge sharing and through use of informal safeguards. In contrast, the upstream RSC relationships are more symbiotic, and value is created through more seamless (and routinized) knowledge sharing practices, and additional use of more formal transaction-specific controls or financial incentives as safeguarding instruments.

Research limitations/implications

The use of consolidated case studies may affect the consistency in the findings presented. Another limitation relates to deriving propositions per each source presented in relational theory.

Practical implications

Practitioners particularly from industries whose global RSCs include different natures of relationships and multiple value incentives can be benefited through this study.

Originality/value

The paper extends the original sources of value creation prescribed in relational theory by contextualizing them in RSCs. It depicts how multidimensional values are created relationally by dyadic partners as the nature of relationship differs between upstream and downstream.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Manoj Kumar Paras, Daniel Ekwall and Rudrajeet Pal

This paper aims to propose a framework for evaluating the performance of reverse value chain activities in the clothing industry operating at base of the pyramid…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a framework for evaluating the performance of reverse value chain activities in the clothing industry operating at base of the pyramid. Specifically, the research explores firm and supply chain factors influencing clothing reverse value chain activities with a focus on developing economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted an explorative technique using direct observations and semi-structured interviews to collect information from eight companies and two traders. Internal resources and value chain capabilities were examined using theoretical underpinnings of resource-based view, transaction cost economics and base of the pyramid.

Findings

The paper identified multiple benefits of offshoring reverse value chain activities to the developing countries (at the base of the pyramid). Low operation cost, skilled manpower, business knowledge and location are found to be internal success factors. While favourable government legislation and domestic recycling markets are important external factors contributing to the success. Developing economies such as India contribute to firm performance by integrating, transforming, acquiring and co-creating the resources at base of the pyramid. Further, it was found that to achieve higher assets specificity, a few companies have opened their own shops in African countries, while others have opened sourcing branches in Canada or the USA to ensure good quality of raw materials. Collaboration and coordination among different value chain partners minimise cost and increases profitability. Innovation in the process such as clothes mutilation for recycling has created new business opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

Information was collected from only eight organisations and two traders from India. Future scholars may extend the research to generalise the findings by documenting similar phenomena.

Practical implications

The proposed framework can serve a basis for the practitioners to evaluate firm performance, and the insights can be used to achieve sustainability by engaging producers, employees, consumers and community using base of the pyramid approach.

Originality/value

The study provides unique insights into the prevalent export and re-exports phenomena of used clothing. The resource-based view, transaction cost economics and base of the pyramid strategy underpinned together to develop a framework for understanding reverse value chain activities of clothing.

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Juan Gabriel Vanegas-López, Jose Jaime Baena-Rojas, Diego Alejandro López-Cadavid and Manoj Mathew

The selection of an international market (IMS) is a prime factor in the success and growth of a company. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to consolidate and apply a…

Abstract

Purpose

The selection of an international market (IMS) is a prime factor in the success and growth of a company. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to consolidate and apply a systematic methodology that contributes toward the evaluation of international markets and promotes entry into the export market of Antioquia’s textile companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a systematic literature review, the criteria and sub-criteria involved in the IMS process are identified and a total of 5 general criteria and 23 sub-criteria are selected. A hybrid approach is used to address the gap. In total, a multiple case study of 11 companies from different range of export values are selected. Data analysis is conducted using two multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) models, namely, the analytic hierarchy process for weighting the factors and the technique for order of preference by similarity to the ideal solution for the country selection ranking.

Findings

The results demonstrate the applicability of the hybrid MCDM technique to improve IMS decision-making in the textile sector and other sectors. It is found that Canada, Belgium and the UK are the best destinations for textile exports with a selection score of 0.7716, 0.7488 and 0.7337, respectively. The sub-criteria belonging to the dimensions of trade barriers, economic factors and costs are the main factors affecting the export of a textile-clothing product.

Research limitations/implications

The possibility of achieving a generalized result through this case study is not possible, but the methodological application carried out is a novel for the selection of markets in the Colombian case and within the literature available in the domain.

Practical implications

From the managerial point of view, firms associated with trade have a broader vision when looking for new markets. Emerging entrepreneurs can equip themselves to enter the international market. Practitioners and policymakers can also use this methodology, which will allow them to evaluate new markets to outline promotional strategies for positioning products abroad.

Social implications

To facilitate the selection of international markets for enterprises.

Originality/value

The contribution of the study is twofold. First, the combination of techniques will allow wider support for the selection of markets and act as a decision support system. On the other hand, this is the first time that such a methodology is used for IMS in the exporting sector not only in Colombia but also in Latin America. Finally, the detailed methodological process described in the study allows both academicians and decision-makers to replicate the study in other contexts and scenarios.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Gitanjali Nain Gill

The purpose of this paper is to provide a case study of a global challenge: the relationship between commercial development and the protection of eco-fragile systems…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a case study of a global challenge: the relationship between commercial development and the protection of eco-fragile systems particularly where river water is involved. It reviews and critiques the legal and political processes that underpinned the Commonwealth Games (CWG) 2010 in Delhi and the building of the accommodation Village on the floodplain of the river Yamuna.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper covers the controversial modern history of the Yamuna river that runs through Delhi. The river is “dead” and has been subject to litigation concerning its usage and that of its flood plain. In particular, the controversy peaked prior to the CWG 2010 in Delhi and the required buildings associated with the games. The paper traces the history of the legal actions and the inter-related involvement of the various actors being the politicians, construction developers, the river bank dwellers and the local environmentalists. Close analysis is made of the statutory administrative procedures required for environmental clearance, the subsequent case law both in the High Court of Delhi and the Supreme Court of India. Additionally, usage is made of the media and its concerns over corrupt and negligent practices.

Findings

The Indian judiciary in their willingness to promote the construction of the Village failed to apply its own environmental jurisprudence. There was a failure to “lift the veil” and review flawed administrative practices that violated governing statutes. National pride, time pressures, political support, economic interests and rapid urbanisation created a pressure that the courts could not challenge. It was left to investigative committees, after the Games had concluded, to expose these wrongdoings.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the issue of the relationship of the courts and political and economic interests and how legally protected ecological interests are ignored.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Fabio Francisco da Silva, Lukas Daniel Filser, Fernando Juliani and Otávio José de Oliveira

Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a continuous improvement methodology used to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of processes. Although there are several articles published…

Abstract

Purpose

Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a continuous improvement methodology used to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of processes. Although there are several articles published, only two have analyzed the literature from a bibliometrics perspective. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the LSS literature by bibliometrics, identifying its state of the art, scientific gaps and research trends.

Design/methodology/approach

Articles published up to 2016 in the database Scopus were investigated to identify the most significant articles, authors, journals, institutions and countries based on citation counting as well as the most frequent keywords and subject areas on LSS. Articles published in 2014, 2015 and 2016 were analyzed to point out scientific gaps and to identify eight main research trends on LSS.

Findings

The research trends are: “LSS implementation”, “Healthcare”, “LSS tools”, “Human factors”, “Expansion of results”, “SME”, “LSS combined with other methodologies” and “Education”. The research outcomes also point out the most significant articles, authors, journals, institutions and countries in LSS literature.

Practical implications

This research contributes to develop the state of the art of LSS and helps professionals as well as researchers to identify which issues new studies should address.

Originality/value

The performance of the literature is measured based on the number of citations and not on the number of published papers, and the bibliometric analysis covers the highest number of articles so far (319 articles). Besides, the identification of the main research trends on LSS is exclusively based on the most recent studies.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sameer Sharma

The Prevention of Money Laundering Act (the PMLA/the Act) was enacted in India in 2002. Since then, Indian courts have had to deal with two interconnected issues owing to…

Abstract

Purpose

The Prevention of Money Laundering Act (the PMLA/the Act) was enacted in India in 2002. Since then, Indian courts have had to deal with two interconnected issues owing to the nature of the offence of money laundering (ML) as conceived in the Act itself. The first issue relates to the independence of the offence of ML from the conviction of the underlying offence; and the second is the manner in which the PMLA operates – whether it does so retrospectively or prospectively. The purpose of this paper is to delve into these questions as there is no definitive and binding answer provided for by the courts. It aims to provide normative answers to the above-mentioned questions to enable better functioning of the Act.

Design/methodology/approach

This research paper examines international conventions relating to ML, reports by inter-governmental bodies, the statutory language of the Act and judgements rendered by courts.

Findings

The paper goes on to conclude that for fulfilling the purpose of the Act, the offence of ML must be considered separate from the conviction of the predicate offence. As a result, it also concludes that the Act must apply in instances where the predicate offence was committed prior to its inclusion in the Act’s Schedule if the act of ML occurs after such inclusion.

Originality/value

There does not exist any scholarly literature addressing the judiciary’s interpretation of the Act regarding the said two issues in a systematic fashion. Added to this is the fact that there exist uncertainty and ambiguity because of conflicting judgements. By analyzing international instruments, the phraseology of the Act and contradictory case-law, this paper attempts to find definitive solutions to the said two questions in a purposive manner.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8