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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2019

Sanjukta Choudhury Kaul, Manjit Singh Sandhu and Quamrul Alam

The design and implementation of an interpretive framework to study historically marginalized issues in management is a distinct area of research. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The design and implementation of an interpretive framework to study historically marginalized issues in management is a distinct area of research. This paper aims to propose a multi-method interpretive framework, integrating a historiographical approach and an archival investigation, and use the case of business responses to disability in colonial and post-independence India to elucidate the proposed framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a summary of a proposed framework for the historical study of marginalized social issues using an interpretive paradigm. It also outlines the advantages and limitations of the proposed framework.

Findings

This paper makes a methodological contribution in multi-method interpretive research design for the historical study of socially constructed issues, neglected because of deep prejudice and social exclusion, that offer complex challenges for modern businesses seeking inclusive workplace strategies.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a research framework that contextualizes social issues in history (historiographical study) and cases of business responses to these issues (archival study) for the examination of historically marginalized issues in the business–society relationship.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Kian Yeik Koay, Fandy Tjiptono and Manjit Singh Sandhu

Despite increasing anti-piracy legislation, digital piracy remains widespread and presents a huge barrier to the growth of creative industries globally. Hence, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite increasing anti-piracy legislation, digital piracy remains widespread and presents a huge barrier to the growth of creative industries globally. Hence, this study aims to examine predictors of digital piracy through the lens of an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Furthermore, the authors also examine the moderating effects of past experience (non-experienced versus experienced) on the relationships between the common four TPB dimensions on intention to engage in digital piracy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a survey method, the authors collected 832 student respondents in Semarang, Indonesia. Partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was performed to analyse the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results showed that the influence of attitude, subjective norm and moral obligation on intention is significantly different between experienced and non-experienced consumers. The positive influence of attitude on intention to engage in digital piracy is stronger for non-experienced than experienced consumers. The influence of subjective norm on intention is significant and positive for non-experienced consumers but is not significant for experienced consumers. The influence of moral obligation on intention is significant and positive for non-experienced consumers but turns negative and significant for experienced consumers.

Originality/value

This research contributed to the body of knowledge by investigating the role of past experience as a moderator in the TPB model which renders the authors to have a better understanding of the differences in the thinking process between experienced and non-experienced consumers.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Sanjukta Choudhury Kaul, Manjit Singh Sandhu and Quamrul Alam

This study aims to explore the role of the Indian merchant class in 19th-century colonial India in addressing the social concerns of disability. Specifically, it addresses…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role of the Indian merchant class in 19th-century colonial India in addressing the social concerns of disability. Specifically, it addresses why and how business engaged with disability in colonial India.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s methodology entailed historiographical approach and archival investigation of official correspondence and letters of business people in 19th-century colonial India.

Findings

Using institutional theory, the study’s findings indicate that guided by philanthropic and ethical motives, Indian businesses, while recognizing the normative and cognitive challenges, accepted the regulative institutional pressures of colonial India and adopted an involved and humane approach. This manifested in the construction of asylums and the setting up of bequeaths and charitable funds for people with disability (PwD). The principal institutional drivers in making of the asylums and the creation of benevolent charities were religion, social practices, caste-based expectations, exposure to Western education and Victorian and Protestantism ideologies, the emergence of colonial notions of health, hygiene and medicine, carefully crafted socio-political and economic policies of the British Raj and the social aspirations of the native merchant class.

Originality/value

In contrast to the 20th-century rights-based movement of the West, which gave birth to the global term of “disability,” a collective representation of different types of disabilities, this paper locates that cloaked in individual forms of sickness, the identity of PwD in 19th-century colonial India appeared under varied fragmented labels such as those of leper, lunatic, blind and infirm. This paper broadens the understanding of how philanthropic business response to disability provided social acceptability and credibility to business people as benevolent members of society. While parallelly, for PwD, it reinforced social marginalization and the need for institutionalization, propagating perceptions of unfortunate and helpless members of society.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Manjit Singh Sandhu, Kamal Kishore Jain and Mohar Yusof

Most past studies on studentsʼ entrepreneurial intention tend to focus on the phenomenon in developed countries.There is limited research on entrepreneurial intention of…

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1555

Abstract

Most past studies on studentsʼ entrepreneurial intention tend to focus on the phenomenon in developed countries.There is limited research on entrepreneurial intention of university students from developing nations. This article intends to close this gap by providing some insights into students℉ entrepreneurial inclination in a developing country, Malaysia. A total of 234 students from three faculties at both graduate and undergraduate levels were surveyed to examine their entrepreneurial inclination and also to examine the relationship between their demographic and social characteristics with entrepreneurial inclination.The study found strong entrepreneurial inclination among the students. Significant difference was found between students studying part time and full time and their entrepreneurial inclination. Significant difference was also found between the type of program enrolled in and students℉ entrepreneurial inclination. Further analysis and other findings were reported and recommendation for future research are been put forth in this article.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Manjit Singh Sandhu, Shaufique Fahmi Sidique and Shoaib Riaz

Postgraduate students who are more mature and have greater job experience are more likely to be inclined towards entrepreneurship. However, postgraduate students face…

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8329

Abstract

Purpose

Postgraduate students who are more mature and have greater job experience are more likely to be inclined towards entrepreneurship. However, postgraduate students face various barriers such as lack of funds, fear of failure and lack of social networking that may hinder their entrepreneurial inclination. The barriers faced by these postgraduate students may also exhibit different dimensions compared with barriers faced by existing entrepreneurs. This study aims to examine the relationship between perceived barriers to entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial inclination.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey‐based methodology, data were collected from a sample of 267 postgraduate students from various Malaysian universities. Respondents' perception towards five barriers to entrepreneurship (aversion to risk, fear of failure, lack of resources, lack of social networking, and aversion to stress and hard work) and their entrepreneurial inclination were assessed.

Findings

The model R‐squared indicated that 31.5 percent of the variation in the entrepreneurial inclination is explained by the five perceived barriers. The highest ranked barrier to entrepreneurship was lack of social networking followed by lack of resources and aversion to risk.

Research limitations/implications

The findings in this study cannot be generalized to non‐student populations since it covers only postgraduate students. The quantitative approach used was unable to uncover in‐depth information on the various barriers. A qualitative approach may be more appropriate to obtain further details.

Originality/value

This research provides interesting insights into the entrepreneurship barriers faced by postgraduate students from a developing nation where such research is lacking.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Kamal Kishore Jain, Manjit Singh Sandhu and See Kwong Goh

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of organizational climate and trust (TR) on knowledge-sharing (KS) behaviour in selected multinational firms in an…

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2123

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of organizational climate and trust (TR) on knowledge-sharing (KS) behaviour in selected multinational firms in an emerging market – Malaysia. Two dimensions of KS – knowledge collecting (KC) and knowledge donating (KD) – were separately studied for this research.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 231 participants from 25 multinational firms. Multivariate analysis was used to assess the research model.

Findings

The research findings indicate that organizational climate dimension, affiliation, is positively related to both KD and KC, while fairness dimensions of organizational climate are not positively related to KD and KC. Among the two dimensions of TR (cognitive and affective), it was found that cognitive TR is positively related to KD, while affective TR is positively related to KC.

Research limitations/implications

The sampling was confined to the Klang Valley area of Malaysia.

Practical implications

The study is useful because it makes an attempt to study the relationship between organizational climate and the two dimensions of KS, KC and KD, separately. The study examines the similar relationship with TR.

Originality/value

This research has provided both theoretical and managerial implications to further advance the literature on the impact of organization factors such as organizational climate (OC) and individual factors such as TR on KS behaviour. This research examines the relationship of OC with specific KS dimensions such as KD and KC. Limited research has addressed this. This research has also contributed further to business literature by applying social capital theory in explaining the impact of multidimensional categories of TR: affective TR and cognitive-based TR on KD and KC.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Manjit Singh Sandhu, Kamal Kishore Jain and Ir Umi Kalthom bte Ahmad

The main purpose of this paper is to: identify the views of public sector employees towards the importance of Knowledge Sharing (KS); identify the barriers to KS; and…

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6178

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to: identify the views of public sector employees towards the importance of Knowledge Sharing (KS); identify the barriers to KS; and identify initiatives that may encourage KS.

Design/methodology/approach

The design employed in this research was mainly descriptive in nature. A survey‐based methodology employing a research questionnaire was used to elicit the views of public sector employees towards KS. A total of 320 questionnaires were randomly distributed and 170 were successfully collected, giving a response rate of 60 percent.

Findings

The results showed that the respondents were very positive in their views towards “importance of KS” and they also strongly felt that knowledge was a source of competitive advantage. However, they were of the view that the importance of knowledge sharing was not clearly communicated and many of them were not sure whether KS strategy existed in their department. The public sector employees also showed self‐serving biases when it came to their willingness to share knowledge compared with their perception of their colleagues' willingness to share knowledge. Respondents perceived organizational barriers as being more critical compared with individual barriers. Main organizational barriers were lacking in IT systems and there was a lack of rewards and recognition. Lack of time, lack of interaction and lack of interpersonal skills were identified as the main individual barriers. The most favoured KS initiatives found in this study was use of e‐mail systems; inter‐agency activities and use of information and communication technology (ICT) followed by support from top management.

Research limitations/implications

The study is confined to the public sector and thus it cannot be generalized to all organizations. The sample for this study is also limited to two public sector departments: ICU (Implementation Coordination Unit) and PWD (Public Works Department) and thus the views are strictly limited to these agencies. The findings from this study can be useful in enhancing public policy towards effective management and implementation of KS programs.

Originality/value

Since there is limited research on KS in the public sector from developing and emerging nations such as Malaysia, this empirical contribution will further enhance the theoretical knowledge on KS in the public sector from a developing nation's perspective. Second, this is one of the few studies that examine views towards knowledge donating and knowledge receiving in the public sector. This area needs the utmost attention, since it was found in this study that employees' perceived knowledge‐sharing willingness (donating) may differ from colleagues' perceived KS willingness (knowledge receiving).

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Visvalingam Suppiah and Manjit Singh Sandhu

This research aimed at investigating the influence of organisational culture types on tacit knowledge sharing behaviour in Malaysian organisations.

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20335

Abstract

Purpose

This research aimed at investigating the influence of organisational culture types on tacit knowledge sharing behaviour in Malaysian organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data was collected from 362 participants from seven organisations. Multiple regression was used to assess the research model.

Findings

The research findings indicate that organisational culture types influence tacit knowledge sharing behaviour and that such influences may be positive or negative depending on the culture type.

Research limitations/implications

The study only investigated seven organisations. A larger sample size may be necessary for a study of this nature. Aside from this the ipsative rating scale was not clearly understood by the respondents resulting in scoring errors by some.

Practical implications

Knowledge is considered the one and only distinct resource and is crucial for an organisation to sustain its competitive advantage. Determining the organisation's culture type will allow managers to implement, among the myriad knowledge sharing activities, the ones that would be more appropriate and relevant to the organisational culture.

Originality/value

Most of the knowledge in organisations is in tacit form. There is a dearth of literature on the influence of organisational culture types on tacit knowledge sharing behaviour. Aside from theoretical contributions, the findings of this study have the potential to assist organisations to unlock economic value from knowledge embedded in the minds of its employees.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 April 2019

Bradley Bowden

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215

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2021

Bradley Bowden and Jeff Muldoon

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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