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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Sagaljit Kaur Sekhon and Manjari Srivastava

The paper aims to understand the role of an individual and the organization for managing workplace loneliness in special workplaces, giving insight into the manifestation…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to understand the role of an individual and the organization for managing workplace loneliness in special workplaces, giving insight into the manifestation of a negative organizational climate which may have an adverse impact on personal and organizational effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

This study considered the existing literature and conducted an independent survey with sailors as the sample.

Findings

Individuals experience feelings of loneliness and it is the collective responsibility of both the individuals and the organizations to help alleviate these feelings.

Research limitations/implications

The present study focused on vulnerable groups of sailors as employees working in remote workplaces.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that leaders can be sensitized to include interventions to assure quality interactions among workers and be facilitators for sharing of emotions, especially in high-risk occupations.

Originality/value

Studying the existence of loneliness among employees in remote workplaces like the shipping sector has received limited attention in previous studies.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Prapti Mutha and Manjari Srivastava

Virtual teams are characterized by short social exchanges and a lack of para-verbal and non-verbal communication. This poses several challenges to virtual leaders. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Virtual teams are characterized by short social exchanges and a lack of para-verbal and non-verbal communication. This poses several challenges to virtual leaders. This study aims to decode the role of leadership and understand its impact on engaging geographically dispersed teams. This research offers a comprehensive view of idealized influence and inspirational motivation – the two sub-factors of transformational leadership which defines the charisma of a leader in leveraging engagement of virtual employees. It also studies the impact of effective leadership communication and trust between team members in engaging employees working in virtual teams.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is a mixed method study. Phase I of qualitative study (10 FGD) facilitated phase II of quantitative study. A questionnaire was developed to reflect themes that emerged from qualitative phase. The focus of the qualitative study was to understand the role of leaders viewed by virtual employees in the context of engagement. A cross-sectional data of 300 respondents from eight different industries was gathered using a survey questionnaire. Purposive non-probability sampling technique was used. Data were analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modelling, SmartPLS 3 software.

Findings

Results showed that leaders play a significant role in engaging virtual employees. The transformational leadership behaviour with a purview of idealized influence and inspirational motivation positively engages employees in virtual teams. The findings emphasize that trust between team members impacts engagement, and trust mediates the relationship between leadership communication effectiveness and engagement of virtual employees.

Practical implications

Positive leadership behaviour such as transformational leadership helps create an environment of trust and engagement that is experienced by a team working distantly. Leader plays a critical role to foster an engaging environment that boosts the potential of every employee. Organizations invest a lot of money, time and resources in leadership and communication training. This study could help organizations in training their managers/leaders for adapting their leadership style that suits the virtual work environment. Organizations can also pay attention to the required skill sets of people while hiring and/or promoting leaders who have to lead virtual employees.

Originality/value

The exponential increase in virtual working has necessitated decoding essential leadership skills to engage the virtual workforce. Working virtually is psychologically a different experience and hence requires a separate study. The lack of proximity and face-to-face conversations in virtual teams increases the complexity of leading and thus alters the engagement equation. This paper explores the impact of leaders in enhancing employee engagement and that is presented in a condensed manner.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Shrikant Mulik, Manjari Srivastava, Nilay Yajnik and Vas Taras

This paper aims to develop and empirically test a model of relationships between antecedents and outcomes of flow experience of users of massive open online courses (MOOC).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop and empirically test a model of relationships between antecedents and outcomes of flow experience of users of massive open online courses (MOOC).

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers surveyed individuals primarily from India, who had enrolled in at least one MOOC offered by MOOC providers such as Coursera, edX and FutureLearn. The data were collected from 310 individuals using an online questionnaire. The partial least squares technique of structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to test the reliability and validity of the data, and the study’s hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The study found support for identification of telepresence, challenge and skill as antecedents of flow experience. MOOC satisfaction and MOOC usage intention were found to be the outcomes of flow experience, as hypnotized. The study also found the mediating role of MOOC satisfaction in the relationship of flow experience and MOOC usage intention.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that if the MOOC providers can orchestrate flow experience for MOOC users then that will increase the satisfaction of MOOC users, which will lead to increase in MOOC adoption.

Originality/value

The study makes the contribution towards better understanding of flow experience in the context of MOOC usage by identifying both antecedents and outcomes of flow experience. Further, it highlights the influencing role of flow experience on MOOC adoption.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 27 October 2016

Elsa Varghese, Meena Galliara and Manjari Srivastava

Social entrepreneurship, Social enterprise.

Abstract

Subject area

Social entrepreneurship, Social enterprise.

Study level/applicability

Masters Programme in Social Entrepreneurship, Social Work, Business Administration; Management Development Programme for Social Entreprenuers.

Case overview

Organisation for Social Change, Awareness and Responsibility (OSCAR) Foundation is a non-profit organisation registered in 2010 under the Bombay Public Trust Act, 1950. Born and raised in the slum colony of Ambedkar Nagar, Cuffe Parade, Ashok, the founder, grew up seeing his friends becoming a victim to many socially inappropriate behaviours due to dropping out of school. Inspired by the thought of breaking this vicious cycle, Ashok used football as a mechanism to instil essential life skills among children and youth and encouraged them to continue their education. The success of his pilot motivated him to set up OSCAR. Presently, through its various programmes, the organisation has reached out to more than 3,000 marginalised children and 500 youths and aims to reach out to 20,000 children by 2020. The case highlights the struggles of Ashok’s entrepreneurial journey and maps the new challenges in scaling up his enterprise.

Expected learning outcomes

The expected learning outcomes are as follows: to identify the characteristics of a social entrepreneur and ascertain the leadership skills required by a social entrepreneur; to scrutinise the life cycle of a social enterprise and develop insights to examine the unique risks and challenges faced at the start-up phase of the social enterprise; and to enhance the understanding of interrelationship between passion, mission focus and challenges to attain financial sustainability for a social venture.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Abstract

Subject area

Social Entrepreneurship.

Study level/applicability

This case study can be used on the module on introduction to social entrepreneurship for postgraduate students specializing in Social Entrepreneurship or Social Work.

Case overview

This case explores the difference between social entrepreneurship and idealism. It captures the journey of Charlene Vaz and Kavita Gonsalves, two passionate young women, who formed “The Bake Collective” (TBC). Kavita and Charlene are both full-time employees, who spend their weekends and evenings running TBC and through bake sells raise funds for supporting social causes. The women have been able to get a teacher hired for differently abled children, provide water purifiers to victims of the Nepal earthquake, furnish a classroom in a school for less privileged children and provide teaching material for schools in over 400 villages in the State of Maharashtra in India. The case highlights the power of volunteering for a cause that can result in developing a social enterprise. It helps to unfold the steps undertaken to kick-start the cause as well as the risks involved in the start-up stage. It also discusses the measures that can be taken to mitigate the risks in the start-up phase and the ways by which social entrepreneurs can scale and grow their programme.

Expected learning outcomes

From this case, students will learn about the factors that lead to the germination of a social enterprise and identify characteristics of social entrepreneurs. They will be able to understand critical factors required to sustain start-up enterprises. The case will also enable students to explore systems and processes that need to be designed to sustain the start-up phase. Further, the case will help students to brainstorm on growth strategies for social enterprises.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Manjari Srivastava

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of workaholism, the factors driving it and its impact on executives and their companies.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of workaholism, the factors driving it and its impact on executives and their companies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the author’s first-hand experience of working in this area.

Findings

It identifies types of workaholism among managers. Explains that the positive side is individuals who are self-reliant, well-organized, have high standards and feel fulfillment when work is completed to a high standard and on time. The negative side is feelings of anxiety and physical and mental exhaustion, being restless and mentally preoccupied with work.

Practical implications

It highlights the roles of parental upbringing, personal values and workplace culture and practices as drivers of workaholism. Being workaholic may lead to a rewarding career but can harm health and work-life balance.

Social implications

It suggests that, by understanding the nature of workaholism, individuals and organizations can take corrective measures.

Originality/value

It takes a psychological approach to understanding and managing workaholism.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 October 2014

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Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Patricia Martinez and Carolina B. Gómez

This study aims to examine how the amount and type of flexibility in work schedule (flextime) and work location (telecommuting) may be related to receiving fewer training…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how the amount and type of flexibility in work schedule (flextime) and work location (telecommuting) may be related to receiving fewer training and development opportunities. Given that under flextime, employees remain at the work location, while under telecommuting employees are removed from the regular work site and social system, the paper expects that as employees have more telecommuting flexibility, they will receive fewer training opportunities, which in turn will be associated with more negative job attitudes and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants (n=298) were recruited from a healthcare and a software development firm. Employees provided self-report ratings of their intentions to quit and supervisor supportiveness. Supervisors rated employees' citizenship behaviors and the flextime, telecommuting and training and development practices for the job positions.

Findings

As employees possess greater flexibility to telecommute, they received fewer training and development opportunities, while employees with greater work schedule flexibility (flextime) actually received more training opportunities. Additionally, the paper finds that training and development mediates the negative relationship between telecommuting flexibility and organizational citizenship behaviors. Thus, as employees had greater telecommuting flexibility, they exhibited lower levels of organization citizenship behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides evidence of how greater telecommuting flexibility that leads to decreased training and development opportunities may negatively influence employees' citizenship behaviors. The study also supports that flexibility to work away from the regular work location and not schedule flexibility, is the key antecedent. The findings suggest that supervisors should monitor the amount of training opportunities provided to employees with telecommuting flexibility.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to examine telecommuting flexibility: the extent to which employees can work at home and modify their schedule in order to do so. It is also one of the few studies to compare how work schedule and work location flexibility may be differentially related to training and development. The paper examines the potential trade-offs between this flexibility and receiving fewer training and development opportunities.

Details

Management Research: The Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

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