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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2018

Marc R.H. Roedenbeck and Manfred Lieb

This paper aims to investigate how a small business is able to continually use entrepreneurial financial sources (i.e. crowdfunding) within and after a successful…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how a small business is able to continually use entrepreneurial financial sources (i.e. crowdfunding) within and after a successful transformation from an entrepreneur. It additionally investigates how a market incumbent is able to successfully join the market of entrepreneurial financial resources.

Design/methodology/approach

Therefore, a comparative case study using qualitative and quantitative data as well as triangulation technique is conducted within the international board game (or tabletop) market at the crowdfunding platform Kickstarter. The US company CMON, which has developed from an entrepreneur to a small business and beyond, is compared with the German incumbent Pegasus. Based on an analysis of a set of key performance indicators suggested in the literature, qualitative and quantitative variables are deductively derived to measure their impact on the financial goal achievement, thereby showing their impact on the goal achievement. During the analysis, additional variables are identified inductively.

Findings

As a result, several qualitative components are found to be crucial, including oral storytelling and computer animated videos/images, a perfect multilingual product language, prototyped components, an active community and a depth and regularity in campaign updates. In quantitative terms, important components include having more product images than longer project descriptions, more optional buys than different but fixed project rewards, a big social network (on Twitter and Facebook), and the number of updates.

Research limitations/implications

Based upon the data and findings, this study invites for more research, especially in conducting a larger scale quantitative analysis using the developed framework to compare more cases within a branch, cases across branches and cases with different background stories.

Practical implications

But to successfully run a crowdfunding campaign, entrepreneurs and incumbents can use the provided measures as a first design- and decision-roadmap, as well as copying the new business strategy of continually practicing crowdfunding for new products.

Originality/value

Despite its limits, this paper offers the first in-depth qualitative and quantitative crowdfunding case study showing on the one hand a new business strategy about crowdfunding as well as providing a structured measure to compare crowdfunding project performance.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Mark Ebers and Manfred Lieb

The favourable prospects of computer integrated manufacturing (CIM)are widely recognised. Based on a case study and relevant literaturesome of the risks associated with…

Abstract

The favourable prospects of computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) are widely recognised. Based on a case study and relevant literature some of the risks associated with CIM are outlined. It is argued that the technological orientation of the CIM vision unwarrantably underestimates organisational and social problems of implementing and applying computerised manufacturing systems. Specifically, it is shown how disregard of uncertainty and of applicants′ divergent motivations may lead to serious friction. The attempt to realise the CIM vision may trigger a social dynamic which impedes the realisation of potential results. Finally, several implications of the research are described.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

John Sharp

Computer production management systems are far more common thanthey were even five years ago, as a result of reductions in the costs ofcomputer hardware and the growing…

Abstract

Computer production management systems are far more common than they were even five years ago, as a result of reductions in the costs of computer hardware and the growing use of package software by both large and small firms. However, there are still many problems associated with such computer systems. Though the symptoms are somewhat different depending on whether we are concerned with large or small companies, the root cause is the same: a lack of any clear philosophy of what production management systems do and how they should be designed. In addition companies face a need to integrate hardware from many different suppliers and the ability to do this would also be helpful to smaller firms. At the moment such integration is difficult to carry out.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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