Search results

1 – 10 of over 198000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

G. Maxwell, M. McDougall and S. Blair

Interest in managing diversity has grown in recent years. From origins in the USA, and initial interest in the idea and ideals of managing diversity, the focus of current…

Downloads
13725

Abstract

Interest in managing diversity has grown in recent years. From origins in the USA, and initial interest in the idea and ideals of managing diversity, the focus of current attention in managing diversity tends to be on its organisational implications and benefits. This article discusses the concept of managing diversity in relation to service quality, a critical goal and priority for all hospitality organisations. It examines the practicalities and potential of managing diversity. Reference is made to case study analyses of UK hotel chains which indicates that, in this sector, approaches to managing diversity are reasonably well developed and are closely linked to enhanced service quality.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Sabrina Spangsdorf and Alex Forsythe

This paper aims to introduce an identity fit perspective adding to the understanding of the Nordic gender equality paradox of top managing positions using a Danish sample as case.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce an identity fit perspective adding to the understanding of the Nordic gender equality paradox of top managing positions using a Danish sample as case.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, five hypotheses concerning identity perception of top managing positions and the relationship with own identity and type of industry were tested through a correlational research design utilizing a cross-sectional survey methodology. A total of 1,054 women aged 18–60 participated in the survey.

Findings

The analysis revealed a strong masculine perception of a top managing position whereas women's own identity perception was much more diverse. The more masculine a woman perceives herself to be, the more motivated she is to climb the career ladder. Type of industry moderates the relationship between identity fit and motivation for top positions, but only for the masculine traits. The relationship between identity fit and motivation is stronger for women in high masculine industries.

Originality/value

Apart from being the first study of identity fit in a Nordic setting, this study contributes to the identity fit theory by employing a semi-objective fit approach exploring identity fit on an industry level, including female-dominated industries, as well as examining identity fit in relation to motivation to pursue a top managing position.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2021

Nyamagere Gladys Sospeter, Pantaleo D. Rwelamila and Joaquim J. Gimbi

This study develops a conceptual framework appropriate for managing Post-Disaster Reconstruction Projects (PDRPs) so as to avoid cost and time overruns in Angola.

Abstract

Purpose

This study develops a conceptual framework appropriate for managing Post-Disaster Reconstruction Projects (PDRPs) so as to avoid cost and time overruns in Angola.

Design/methodology/approach

An explanatory sequential mixed research approach was used. Data was collected from project participants within the ministry of planning, the provincial government office of planning and the local government in Angola. A questionnaire with closed questions was completed by 130 survey respondents. Semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with seven participants selected through purposive sampling. Descriptive statistics, t-test and content analysis were used to analyse quantitative and qualitative data, respectively.

Findings

The study indicates that there is presently no formal project management process. Neither have government project management standards been developed and broadcast. This results in ad hoc processes being mostly used for managing PDRPs. The study further presents disaster preparation programme, community engagement, resources and stakeholder's engagement, post-disaster procurement policies, financial guides, post-disaster recovery legislation, context-specific (social economic, demographic, political and cultural variables), programme preparation as essential components to be considered for developing an appropriate framework for managing PDRPs.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by its geographical settings which focussed the results on one province in Angola. However, the findings can be useful for other countries wishing to gain insights on the framework with “overlooked components” for managing DPRPs in emerging countries with similar disaster environment, government policies and same business environment.

Practical implications

The framework for managing PDRPs may positively impact project realization, hence minimization of time and cost overruns. The findings are vital for managers, local practitioners and policy/decision-makers in emerging countries of essential components and lessons useful for managing PDRPs and making decisions when they intend to participate in such projects. An understanding of which approaches are critical and essential components of the framework serves as a basis for improving project delivery. Future research studies should describe its practical application.

Originality/value

The study provides insights by identifying an ordered grouped set of project management models/approaches mostly applicable for managing PDRPs in Angola, better understanding of appropriate components/variables to be considered and develops a conceptual framework for managing PDRPs in emerging countries, post-war context.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Chaturong Napathorn

This paper examines the human resource (HR) strategies and practices that are considered to be particularly beneficial for aging employees in organizations in Thailand…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the human resource (HR) strategies and practices that are considered to be particularly beneficial for aging employees in organizations in Thailand, which is an underresearched developing economy, from an employee perspective and the implications of national institutions and cultures for the adoption and implementation of those HR strategies and practices across organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The results of the study, based on a cross-case analysis of seven organizations across industries, are primarily drawn from structured interviews and focus groups with aging employees, field visits and a review of archival documents and web-based resources, including newspaper reports and magazines.

Findings

This paper proposes that HR strategies that are appropriate for managing aging employees in organizations in Thailand’s developing economy can be classified into four bundles: growth, maintenance, recovery and regulation. Each bundle of HR strategies consists of several HR practices that are appropriate for managing aging employees in organizations. In particular, from the perspective of aging employees, these HR practices help aging employees upgrade their skills, prepare them to have a sufficient amount of financial savings after retirement, ensure that they are safe, secure and healthy, help them feel that their tacit knowledge and experience are still valuable, and help them perform jobs that are appropriate for their physical health conditions. Additionally, the adoption and implementation of the proposed HR strategies and practices tend to be influenced by national institutions in terms of deficiencies in the national skill formation system, healthcare institutions, regulatory institutions and welfare state regime and by the national culture in terms of reciprocity and respect for elderly people (i.e. aging employees). However, there are five important HR practices that are specifically appropriate for managing aging employees in Thailand and other developing economies where the level of household debt and/or personal debt is high, where the increasing number of aging employees leads to high demand for medical services when the medical services offered by private hospitals are expensive, and where tacit knowledge and experience are important for creating and maintaining firms’ competitive advantage: (1) the facilitation of financial planning, (2) safety and health training, (3) annual health check-ups, (4) the appointment of aging employees as advisors/mentors and (5) knowledge transfer/job enrichment.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this research is its methodology. Because this research is based on case studies of seven firms located in Thailand, the findings may not be generalizable to all other firms across countries. Rather, the aim of this paper is to further the discussion regarding HR strategies and practices for managing aging employees in organizations. Another limitation of this research is that it does not include firms located in several other industries, including the agricultural and fishery industry and the financial services industry. Future research may explore HR strategies and practices for managing aging employees in organizations located in these industries. Moreover, quantitative studies using large samples of aging employees who work in firms across industries might also be useful in deepening the understanding of HR strategies and practices for managing aging/retired employees in organizations.

Practical implications

This paper provides practical implications for top managers and/or HR managers of firms in Thailand and other developing economies where the level of household debt and/or personal debt is high, where the increasing number of aging employees leads to high demand for medical services when the medical services offered by private hospitals are expensive, and where tacit knowledge and experience are important for creating and maintaining firms’ competitive advantage. In particular, the aging employees in this study identified the HR practices that they perceive as being appropriate for aging employees and that were already available in firms or that they expect their firms to have but are currently missing. In this regard, HR managers should take note of these good and appropriate HR practices to ensure that they become part of official, structured HR strategies and practices. This would ultimately help line managers and aging employees think more positively about the future of aging employees within the company and help retain invaluable aging employees over time.

Social implications

This paper provides social/policy implications for the government and/or relevant public agencies of Thailand and several other developing economies where the majority of aging people do not have sufficient savings to support themselves after retirement, especially when these countries are becoming aging societies, where the increasing demand for medical services cannot be adequately addressed by existing public hospitals while private hospitals’ medical prices are quite expensive, and where intellectual property right (IPR) protection laws are weak. That said, such governments should encourage firms located in their countries to implement these HR strategies and practices for developing, maintaining, deploying and supporting aging employees.

Originality/value

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on human resource management (HRM), specifically on HR practices for aging employees, in the following ways. First, this study is different from the previous studies in that it examines HR practices for managing aging employees from an employee perspective, while most of the previous studies in this area have focused on the management of such employees from an employer perspective. In this case, it is possible that formal company policies may be different from actual HR practices as perceived by aging employees (Khilji and Wang, 2006). Second, this paper explores the implications of national institutions and cultures of Thailand’s developing economy for the adoption and implementation of HR strategies and practices that are appropriate for managing aging employees in organizations. Finally, this paper examines HR practices that are specifically appropriate for managing aging employees in Thailand and other developing economies. The literature on HR practices for aging employees has overlooked developing economies, including the underresearched country of Thailand, as most of the studies in this area have focused on developed economies. In fact, developed economies and developing economies are very different in several respects, which may influence the HR strategies and practices that are appropriate for managing aging employees in organizations.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Organisational Roadmap Towards Teal Organisations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-311-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2004

Duncan Angwin

Managing Executives occupy a pivotal role in the acquisition process. It is virtually inconceivable that major Merger and Acquisitions (M&As) could proceed without their…

Abstract

Managing Executives occupy a pivotal role in the acquisition process. It is virtually inconceivable that major Merger and Acquisitions (M&As) could proceed without their personal sponsorship (Hayward & Hambrick, 1997). They are central to the negotiation and signing for such deals and it is these negotiations that raise questions over how the target company should be run post-acquisition, how it should be configured to fit within the newly expanded group and what sort of strategy may be appropriate for the future. Managing Executives embody their firm’s strategies and so are intimately connected with these issues of organisational fit and strategic rational. With negotiations focussed upon the future of their businesses and their personal places in corporate history, these contests can be very dramatic. The high stakes are evident in the substantial levels of acquired Managing Executive departure post-acquisition. Whilst we can observe that many acquired Managing Executives subsequently leave the enlarged firm, little evidence to date answers the question of why they have been retained or replaced?

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-264-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 May 2020

Aboobucker Ilmudeen and Yukun Bao

The multifaceted effect of IT in organizations has been widely examined. However, the intervening role of IT strategy and business strategy on the effect of managing IT on…

Abstract

Purpose

The multifaceted effect of IT in organizations has been widely examined. However, the intervening role of IT strategy and business strategy on the effect of managing IT on firm performance remains less strong. This study examines how managing information technology (MIT) effects on firm performance by looking at the mediating role of IT strategy and business strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the resource-based view of IT and contingency perspective, theoretical insights for managing IT and the mediating effect of IT strategy and business strategy on firm performance are established. The model is empirically tested by using hierarchical regression and structural equation modeling for the data collected through the survey of 194 senior IT and business managers in China.

Findings

The significant and impactful relationship found in the model for the proposed idea. The results show that both IT strategy and business strategy partially mediate the effect of managing IT on firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

The findings highlight that managing IT does not merely influence better firm performance; instead, the coherent amalgamation of IT strategy and business strategy can enrich firm performance. The theoretical and practical implications are also discussed.

Originality/value

In line with the call for rigorous research to integrate the managing IT and firm strategies, this study demonstrates the mediating role of business strategy and IT strategy between the managing IT and the firm performance relationship, hence contributing to the IS research literature.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Deborah Jones

Managing diversity” has emerged as a new and contested vocabulary for addressing issues of difference in organisations. This paper uses a New Zealand case study to…

Downloads
4730

Abstract

Managing diversity” has emerged as a new and contested vocabulary for addressing issues of difference in organisations. This paper uses a New Zealand case study to exemplify a feminist post‐structuralist reading of managing diversity. The paper argues that a feminist post‐structuralist approach not only addresses feminist theoretical debates about identity, equality and difference, but also opens up new opportunities for practitioners in managing diversity and equal employment opportunities (EEO) to reflect on their own organisational change practice. The paper presents three readings of managing diversity: a discourse of exploitation which provides oppositional readings of managing diversity as a form of human resource management; a discourse of difference, drawing on refusals of managing diversity in accounts from minority group perspectives; and a discourse of equality where EEO practitioners have questioned managing diversity in the context of EEO.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Alice Christudason

This study aims to enlighten strata property owners about the importance of choosing the appropriate vehicle for the management of the common property in their strata development.

Downloads
3256

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to enlighten strata property owners about the importance of choosing the appropriate vehicle for the management of the common property in their strata development.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology employed for this inquiry is a case study of two residential strata‐titled properties. The two were selected on the basis that, although they share certain similar characteristics including age, tenure and locational attributes, each employs different systems of property management. Data were gathered mainly through interviews with the Property Managers and Chairs of the Management Council. Interviews were also carried out with professionals in the real estate industry specializing in property and facilities management.

Findings

The study reveals the various factors of which Management Corporations should be mindful when deciding what form of property management vehicle to use. Careful consideration of these factors will result in a decision that not only is cost‐effective, but also provides greater efficiency in the management and maintenance of the strata titled development.

Practical implications

Careful consideration of the factors revealed in the findings can result in a decision by the Management Corporation, which is cost‐effective. Evaluation of the factors will also result in greater efficiency in the management and maintenance of common property in the strata titled development.

Originality/value

This is an up‐to‐date comparison of two property management systems available to strata developments, in the context of the Singapore Land Titles (Strata) Act, which is based on New South Wales' legislation. The information is useful for strata owners and Management Councils in other jurisdictions in that it provides pointers on the choice of a property management system.

Details

Property Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Shakeel Ahmad Khan and Rubina Bhatti

The purpose of this study was to explore the essential digital competencies for developing and managing digital libraries. The study identified useful training programs…

Downloads
2564

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore the essential digital competencies for developing and managing digital libraries. The study identified useful training programs for university librarians to acquire digital competencies. It examined their digital competencies for developing and managing digital libraries in universities of Pakistan. This study also evaluates their digital knowledge in applying security measures to protect digital contents.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative research method was used to conduct this study. Research questions and hypothesis were developed to achieve the objectives. In-depth review of related literature was conducted to draft a list of essential digital competencies for developing and managing digital libraries. It was circulated among the panel of experts to get their valuable feedback to make a final list of digital competencies for developing and managing digital libraries. A questionnaire was developed to measure the status of digital competencies of university librarians in Pakistan. It was pre-tested on 20 respondents before applying to the whole population. SPSS software was used to analyze data. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied to achieve results.

Findings

The findings of the study showed that digital competencies for developing and managing digital libraries fall into three main categories: digital competencies for developing digital libraries; digital competencies for managing digital libraries; and digital competencies to protect digital contents. The results revealed that training programs offered by Higher Education Commission (HEC), library associations, library schools, in-house trainings, use of online tutorials and trainings offered by skilled professionals are highly important and useful for university librarians to acquire digital competencies. The study concluded that the university librarians working in HEC recognized universities in Punjab province possess basic level of digital competencies for developing and managing digital libraries. Their digital competencies vary on the basis of their university type, i.e. public and private sector.

Research limitations/implications

This study measures digital competencies of university librarians in Pakistan. The study has practical implications for librarians, library schools, library associations, university libraries and HEC.

Practical implications

This study has practical implications for librarians, information professionals, libraries and library schools. The results are useful for librarians to get knowledge of digital competencies which are essential for developing and managing digital libraries and protecting digital contents. They can develop their digital competencies in identified areas. This study has identified useful training programs for university librarians for acquiring digital competencies. The university librarians should use these programs to gain needed digital skills.

Social implications

Librarians can get knowledge of digital competencies for developing and managing digital libraries to face the challenges of digital age.

Originality/value

In contrast to previous research work on investigating computer skills, information and communication technology skills, technological skills and general digital skills, this study particularly identifies the essential digital competencies for developing and managing digital libraries. It helps library and information science schools, library associations, training groups and university libraries to offer adequate training opportunities in identified areas to meet the challenges of the digital age.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 198000