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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Abdalla F. Hayajneh and Bel Gacem Raggad

The relationship between the personal value systems of managers and their managerial success was investigated for a national sample of Jordanian managers. The results of…

Abstract

The relationship between the personal value systems of managers and their managerial success was investigated for a national sample of Jordanian managers. The results of this study revealed that the personal value systems of the sampled managers are related to their success as managers. It was also found that there are differences between the personal value systems of more successful managers and those of less‐successful managers. While more successful managers have dynamic and achievement‐oriented values, less/successful managers have more traditional moral and religion values.

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International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Mohammad Dalvi-Esfahani, T. Ramayah and Azizah Abdul Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of the personal values on the antecedents of managers’ intention to adopt Green information system (Green…

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1203

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of the personal values on the antecedents of managers’ intention to adopt Green information system (Green IS) utilising the norm activation theory and the Schwartz’s values system.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine the effects of the identified factors on the behavioural intention, the survey method was employed. The questionnaire was distributed targeting decision makers of companies in three industries – oil/gas/energy, transportation and manufacturing and construction. With 146 valid questionnaires in hand, the collected data were analysed using the partial least squares structural equation modelling technique.

Findings

The results revealed that moral obligation (personal norm) of managers influenced their intention to adopt Green IS. While the awareness of consequences and ascription of responsibility are influencing the intention, but the analyses revealed that they are mediated by the personal norm. The moderating role of personal values was further analysed and the results showed that the managers with more orientation towards self-transcendence values have higher intention to adopt Green IS.

Originality/value

This study serves as a call to the IS literature to incorporate values, beliefs, and norms into their model of individual-level decision making towards contemporary innovation adoption. By enriching the understanding of the influence of values and attitudinal factors on the decision-making process, the research model sheds light on how managers intend to diffuse IS initiatives in their organisations for the purpose of environmental sustainability.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Rosemond Boohene, Alison Sheridan and Bernice Kotey

While most studies concerning gender differences in small business performance have emerged from developed countries, how applicable the results are to transitional…

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4970

Abstract

Purpose

While most studies concerning gender differences in small business performance have emerged from developed countries, how applicable the results are to transitional economies, where there still exist significant differences in the socialisation of men and women, is not clear. The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of gender on the performance of small businesses in Ghana by exploring the impact of personal values on business owners' choice of strategies, specifically asking, do women and men pursue different business strategies, how do personal values influence their strategies and how do their strategies affect performance?

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 600 owner‐managers of small retail shops in the Greater Accra Region were surveyed. Results were analysed using the partial least squares approach to structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results suggest that there are gender differences in personal values, which lead to different strategies adopted by women and men, which in turn influence performance; specifically Ghanaian women owner‐managers are more risk‐averse than Ghanaian men, and this affects their pursuit of specific functional strategies and ultimately their performance in varied ways.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies will need to replicate these findings with other types of businesses, in other locations.

Practical implications

The results suggest that closer attention should be given to developing the entrepreneurial values of women if the goal of greater economic development is to be achieved in transitional economies.

Originality/value

Limited research has been conducted on women and men small business owners in transitional economies such as Ghana. This empirical research provides important insights into this field.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Francis Asah, Olawale Olufunso Fatoki and Ellen Rungani

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the impact of motivation, personal values and managerial skills of managers on the performance of small and medium…

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2532

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the impact of motivation, personal values and managerial skills of managers on the performance of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through the use of self-administered questionnaire in a survey. Data analysis included factor analysis, descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation and regression analysis.

Findings

The findings revealed significant positive relationships between motivations, personal values and managerial skills of SME owners on performance.

Research limitations/implications

Access to external finance (debt or equity) is one of the factors that can impact on the performance of growing SMEs. The non-accessibility of debt finance from commercial banks and trade creditors is seen as one of the major contributing factors to the failure of SMEs in South Africa. This study did not link access to finance to performance.

Practical implications

The failure rate of SMEs is very high in South Africa. The study suggests that SME owners should incorporate values and improve management skills. In addition, SMEs that are motivated by opportunity have a better chance of survival.

Social implications

To reduce unemployment and poverty in South Africa.

Originality/value

This study adds to the understanding of the relationship between of personal values, motivations and management skills of managers and the performance of SMEs from a developing country perspective.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2009

Arthur Wolak

Although Australia and English Canada share common British colonial origins, they have not evolved into identical cultures. This is likely because they do not share an…

Abstract

Purpose

Although Australia and English Canada share common British colonial origins, they have not evolved into identical cultures. This is likely because they do not share an identical pattern of cultural values. Research has shown that, while common values certainly exist, each nation's dominant values are neither identical for all values nor are specific common values necessarily shared to the same degree. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast seven key values studies and considers their managerial implications.

Design/methodology/approach

This review of comparative values studies helps identify, through analysis and comparison with other cultures, subtle differences between Australian and Canadian cultural values.

Findings

Distinct Australian and Canadian value profiles emerge when each culture is contrasted with other, especially Anglo‐based, cultures. However, the studies in this review do not explore in great detail how such values became prominent cultural markers. This review therefore suggests that the impact of Anglo‐Celtic immigrants during each nation's formative periods may be a primary underlying cause that deserves further study.

Research limitations/implications

The studies rely on various value scales to identify cultural similarities and differences. Such studies are cross‐sectional and do not analyze the results from a longitudinal or historical perspective. Nonetheless, reviewing these values studies contributes to the understanding of contemporary Australia, English Canada, and their respective managerial cultures. This review does not examine French Canadian values studies because of this analysis' focus on Anglo cultures to determine distinctions among dominant values and to suggest reasons for differences among those sharing a common British colonial heritage.

Practical implications

This review informs practicing managers in Australia, Canada, and others considering entering these cultures, which values haven proven culturally important and how local values could impact managerial decision‐making behavior.

Originality/value

Given a lack of research directly comparing Australian and Canadian cultural and/or managerial values, this review of significant comparative values studies helps identify distinctions worthy of further investigation. The critical discussion considers limitations of the current literature, as well as areas for future research that include ethno‐cultural factors in organizational research that are important for domestic enterprises and multinational corporations entering each market.

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International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Patrick E. Connor, Boris W. Becker, Larry F. Moore and Yoshiju Okubo

This paper reports an investigation of the personal-values systems of 567 public-sector managers from the U.S., Canada, and Japan. The results of this research indicate…

Abstract

This paper reports an investigation of the personal-values systems of 567 public-sector managers from the U.S., Canada, and Japan. The results of this research indicate that, despite some specific differences, there is an overarching, coherent North American public-sector managerial values systems. Moreover, it is similar in some ways to that of its Japanese counterparts. However, these values systems - North American and Japanese - are clearly distinct

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Claudio Camfield and Mário Franco

The purpose of this paper is to find evidence contributing to construction of the dimensions of personal values, professionalization and succession, as well as proposing a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find evidence contributing to construction of the dimensions of personal values, professionalization and succession, as well as proposing a new theoretical framework (model) showing the relations between these dimensions and their factors.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach was adopted, more precisely the case study method. Four Portuguese family firms were selected, with a total of 11 participants. The data-gathering techniques included the interview method, non-participative observation and documentary analysis. To ensure systematization and reliability of data, the content analysis method was used with the help of NVIVO software.

Findings

Based on the results, eight factors were obtained explaining the professionalization dimension, the succession dimension was formed of four factors and the personal values dimension was made up of three factors. It was also possible to demonstrate the relationships between personal values, professionalization and succession in family firms.

Practical implications

The results obtained here can provide information to help managers in this type of firm, for example, to know themselves better, about their values and beliefs and how these can help in their daily relationships, in both the family and business domain, as well as in decision making about aspects of succession and professionalization.

Originality/value

This research makes important contributions to studies considering the family firm context. It will help to fill part of the gap in existing studies involving the psychological aspects in family firm management. It also presents important results about personal values and their relations with succession and professionalization of family firm management, as well as adding value to recent studies on the socio-emotional wealth of this type of firm.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Anil Boz Semerci

The purpose of this paper was to examine knowledge hiding behaviours with perceived conflict types, competition and personal values of employees.

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1410

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine knowledge hiding behaviours with perceived conflict types, competition and personal values of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were carried out and structural equation modelling and moderated regression analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Study I, with employees from software development companies, revealed that task conflict and relationship conflict have additive effect on knowledge hiding behaviour. Additionally, task conflict is positively related to employees’ perceived competition. However, no mediation role of perceived competition was found between conflict types and knowledge hiding. Study II, with employees from the banking sector, indicated that employees’ individualistic or collectivistic values play a moderating role between perceived task conflict and knowledge hiding behaviours. The negative effect of task conflict on knowledge hiding behaviour is higher if the individuals have individualistic personal values.

Practical implications

This study contributes to managers by offering some guidance on what can be the results of conflict and competition between employees and how employees’ personal values can affect conflict and knowledge hiding relation.

Originality/value

To the challenges of knowledge hiding behaviour outcomes for businesses, many managers should first consider the predictors of knowledge hiding and then find some solutions against the negative consequences. This study is one of the first to examine knowledge hiding with regard to conflict types, perceived competition between employees and personal values of employees.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Helena Sjögrén, Kaisu Puumalainen and Pasi Syrjä

The paper seeks to explain the differences in drawings (e.g. owner‐manager dividends and salary) strategies among small business managers to show that owner‐managers'…

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1153

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to explain the differences in drawings (e.g. owner‐manager dividends and salary) strategies among small business managers to show that owner‐managers' personal work values impact on the strategic choices of firms. It also examines the relationships between owner‐managers' work values and the amount of dividends the entrepreneurs take out of the business in order to follow the chosen strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper contributes to the existing knowledge of entrepreneurship and small business management. Legal constraints and strategic motivations are essential to drawings strategy. The paper analyses the owner‐managers' work‐related values as a potential determinant of the drawings strategy. The empirical data used to test the hypotheses were drawn from a mail survey and financial statements. The final drawings strategy scales were formed with the help of exploratory factor analysis.

Findings

The findings provided evidence that work values are related to drawings strategy factors, and the factors reflect entrepreneurs' attitudes to drawings taken out of the business. However, the authors could not find any relationship between the drawings strategy and how entrepreneurs behave when they actually take dividends.

Practical implications

The findings of this research surprisingly provided evidence that entrepreneurs are unaware of the peremptory provisions of the Finnish Limited Liability Companies Act. When entrepreneurs decide on the amount of dividends, tax legislation clearly dominates their decision making. This could lead to a situation where the entrepreneur takes more dividends than the solvency test of the Finnish Limited Liability Companies Act allows.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the existing knowledge of entrepreneurship and small business management.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

William A. Hailey, Edward J. Ryan and Charles K. Woodruff

The extent of congruence between managerial values andorganisational goals is addressed from the perspective of assessingwhether there is sufficient managerial commitment…

Abstract

The extent of congruence between managerial values and organisational goals is addressed from the perspective of assessing whether there is sufficient managerial commitment to allow for effective implementation of competitivefirm strategy. A group of production managers is compared with a group of quality control managers, using a hierarchical model reflecting decision‐process goal constraints. Study results reveal that the goal hierarchies of production managers differ significantly from quality control managers. Given the role demands of each manager group, the congruence levels between managerial values and organisational goals are sufficient to satisfy organisational accountability. Several implications for strategic planning are presented.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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