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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Reza Salehzadeh, Arash Shahin, Ali Kazemi and Ali Shaemi Barzoki

Literature review indicates lack of using the Kano model in organizational behavior domain and managerssatisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to propose a Kano-based…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature review indicates lack of using the Kano model in organizational behavior domain and managerssatisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to propose a Kano-based model for managerssatisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to examine one of the proposed behaviors in this model, the role of employees’ organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) as an attractive behavior, has been investigated. The statistical population includes managers of the Isfahan’s financial service industries. After distributing questionnaires, 224 accurate questionnaires have been used for data analysis. In designing the survey questionnaire, the OCB questionnaire developed by Podsakoff et al. (1990) and Bell and Menguc (2002) has been used. For each of the OCB dimensions, some questions have been initially designed; then after collecting data, by using Kano evaluation table, the behavior types have been determined.

Findings

Findings imply that by using the Kano model, five types of behaviors, i.e. must-be, one-dimensional, attractive, indifferent, and reverse can be identified. The findings related to case study also indicate that out of five dimensions of OCB, three dimensions of altruism, sportsmanship, and civic virtue are located in Attractive category; the courtesy dimension is located in must-be category; the conscientiousness dimension is located in one-dimensional category; and in reverse category, no dimension is located. In general, OCB is located in attractive category.

Research limitations/implications

By using the results of this survey, a new classification of employees’ behaviors types can be suggested. The results of this study can help employees in understanding what kind of their behaviors causes managerssatisfaction.

Originality/value

The results of this study have an important contribution in the literature of the Kano model and OCB.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2009

Loreta Gustainienė and Auksė Endriulaitienė

The aim of this study is to examine gender and age correlates of job satisfaction and to test the relationship between job satisfaction and subjective mental and physical…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to examine gender and age correlates of job satisfaction and to test the relationship between job satisfaction and subjective mental and physical health in a sample of sales managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey of 200 employees holding the managers' positions (105 men and 95 women) in sales' organizations across the biggest Lithuania's cities were conducted. Job satisfaction was assessed by 20‐item Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire developed by Weiss, Davis, England and Lofquist in 1967. Subjective health was assessed by questions measuring subjective physical health, and the 12‐item General Health Questionnaire developed by Goldberg (1970). Correlation analysis was used to test the relationship between job satisfaction and subjective health.

Findings

The study results demonstrate that men sales managers, as compared to women, had higher scores on overall extrinsic job satisfaction. Younger men managers were less satisfied with their job in general and social service and achievement in particular (intrinsic satisfaction). Sales managers with higher education (n=139) were more satisfied with responsibility (3.64±0.75 vs 3.25±0.80, respectively) and creativity (3.76±0.87 vs 3.43±0.95, respectively) levels in organization, as compared to managers having other than higher education (n=61). No distinct gender‐related differences were seen regarding managers' subjective health. Our research supports general findings in literature, relating lower job satisfaction scores with worse health. Worse subjective mental health was related to dissatisfaction with independence, variety, social status, ability utilization, and working conditions. Worse subjective mental health among women managers was related to dissatisfaction with independence, activity, variety, social status, moral values, and compensation, and satisfaction with authority level. Women sales managers, unlike men managers, with better subjective physical health were more satisfied with variety, moral values, social service, and responsibility.

Research limitations/implications

Nonprobability sampling does not allow larger generalizations. Small sample size restricted the analysis of the constructs more deeply. Groups, used for data analysis, were not adjusted by age, education, work experience, etc. Methods used in the study are still under adaptation. Reporting bias because of social desirability effects was not studied in this research as well.

Practical implications

Job satisfaction plays an important role in peoples' lives and is an important research topic of human resource management having both theoretical and practical implications. Understanding the impact of job facets upon satisfaction with work can initiate positive changes in organizations, which could improve working conditions of employees, resulting in lower turnover, absenteeism, and higher organizational commitment – healthy workers in a healthy organization.

Originality/value

The research contributes to job satisfaction literature by providing empirical findings regarding the relationship between job satisfaction and subjective health.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Rashed Al‐Ajmi

The present study is an empirical evaluation of job satisfaction among the managers involved in the oil industry in Kuwait. The study was conducted on 153 full‐time…

Abstract

The present study is an empirical evaluation of job satisfaction among the managers involved in the oil industry in Kuwait. The study was conducted on 153 full‐time managers selected from three different oil companies. Mean student's t‐test, Scheffe test, and One‐Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were employed to analyze the data. The result indicates that there were significant differences found with regard to age, years of experience, managerial rank, and education.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 11 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Ebru Gunlu, Mehmet Aksarayli and Nilüfer Şahin Perçin

The aim of this paper is to identify the effects of job satisfaction on organizational commitment for managers in large‐scale hotels in the Aegean region of Turkey and, in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to identify the effects of job satisfaction on organizational commitment for managers in large‐scale hotels in the Aegean region of Turkey and, in addition, to examine whether there is a significant relationship between the characteristics of the sample, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Two structured questionnaires were administered to large‐scale hotel managers in the tourism industry. The survey instruments were adopted from the validated Minnesota Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment Questionnaire of Meyer‐Allen. The data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 13.0.

Findings

The findings indicate that extrinsic, intrinsic, and general job satisfaction have a significant effect on normative commitment and affective commitment. In addition, the findings suggest that the dimensions of job satisfaction do not have a significant effect on continuance commitment among the managers of large‐scale hotels. When the characteristics of the sample are regarded, age, income level, and education have a significant relationship with extrinsic job satisfaction whereas income level indirectly affect affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Participants are limited to the managers of large‐scale hotels in Aegean region of Turkey so the results could not be generalized to the whole country; however, the number of respondents is assumed to be sufficient to provide comprehensive results.

Practical implications

Although job satisfaction is found to affect organizational commitment, practitioners should not disregard the fact that there is an interactive relationship between the two factors; otherwise, the organizations might be at risk. In addition, the governmental support is very important in minimizing the effects of seasonality problem in tourism.

Originality/value

The previous research studies in Turkey generally have focused on the organizational commitment and job satisfaction correlation among the employees in different sectors of Turkey but usually within one organization. Upper level managers' views and the tourism sector have sometimes been neglected. This research was conducted to address this deficit in Turkey in terms of reaching various hotels in a region, trying to measure the viewpoints of the upper level managers, and conducting the research in a labor‐intensive sector such as tourism.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Carol Lu, Celine Berchoux, Michael W. Marek and Brendan Chen

The purpose of this paper was to determine whether luxury hotel managers and customers have the same understanding of service quality and satisfaction and whether there is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to determine whether luxury hotel managers and customers have the same understanding of service quality and satisfaction and whether there is a disparity between services offered by luxury hotels and the way customers actually experience them.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used interviews with managers and guests of 5-Star hotels in Taiwan and qualitative analysis to understand definitions and perceptions of luxury, service quality and satisfaction.

Findings

The major findings of the study were that: there were no fundamental disconnects in the respective understandings of managers and guests; however, the two groups used different language to describe luxury, service quality and satisfaction; the managers evaluated satisfaction in terms of services provided, but the guests conceptualized satisfaction in terms of value received for the price of lodging; and luxury, service quality and satisfaction were closely related in the minds of the managers and guests and were not independent constructs.

Research limitations/implications

Recommendations are made based on marketing communications theory, that is all factors identified in this study can be considered to be part of the brand identity of the hotel; local culture can introduce variables that may be outside the scope of international standards; and information on local expectations and preferences can inform advertising and public relations efforts of the hotel.

Originality/value

This study is significant because little research into luxury hotel customer satisfaction has been done using qualitative methodology, which provides a richer understanding of the experiences of the participants than can quantitative design.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Alan J. Dubinsky, Rajiv Mehta and Rolph E. Anderson

States that little empirical work is available as a guide in the design and implementation of sales manager training programs. Examines the relationship between trainee…

Abstract

States that little empirical work is available as a guide in the design and implementation of sales manager training programs. Examines the relationship between trainee satisfaction with sales manager training (a measure for training effectiveness) and the format, site, instructor, instructional method, and content of the program. Reports results of a survey of sales managers in field sales organizations. Indicates that training satisfaction is associated with all five issues. Offers direct implications for enhancing sales manager training programs.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Alessandro Ancarani, Carmela Di Mauro and Maria D. Giammanco

The purpose of this paper, in the context of hospital wards, is to test a model in which the ward manager's orientation towards a given organizational climate contributes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, in the context of hospital wards, is to test a model in which the ward manager's orientation towards a given organizational climate contributes to determine the climate perceived by medical and nursing staff, and this, in turn, has an impact on patient satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of the study is cross‐sectional. The manager's climate orientation, employee perceptions of organizational climate, and patient satisfaction questionnaires were administered to ward managers, medical staff, and inpatients in 57 wards belonging to ten public hospitals in Italy. The hypothesised model was tested using two‐level structural equation modelling.

Findings

Different climates impact on patient satisfaction in a different way. Evidence was found that a human relation climate augments patient satisfaction. Ward managers' orientation on specific organizational models is matched by the actual climate perceived by medical and nursing staff. Comparison between alternative nested models shows that there is evidence in favour of the mediating effect of climate between the managers' climate orientation and patient satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of the paper is the cross‐sectional nature of the data set, which does not allow for definitive conclusions on the direction of causality links.

Practical implications

Understanding the link between climate and patient satisfaction may guide hospitals towards a more conscious selection of the appropriate organizational model.

Originality/value

The contribution of the present paper to the extant literature is twofold. First, it verifies whether the ward manager's climate orientation is matched by the organizational climate as perceived by subordinates. Second, it investigates the mediating role that organizational climate plays between ward managers' orientations and patient satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Cheryl Alleyne, Andrew Kakabadse and Nada Kakabadse

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of the use of the human resources (HR) intranet at managerial levels in terms of internal customer satisfaction with the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of the use of the human resources (HR) intranet at managerial levels in terms of internal customer satisfaction with the HR function.

Design/methodology/approach

Using role theory to underpin the research, this study examines both the changing role of managers as well as managers' expectations of the HR function as an internal service provider and HR's use of intranet applications to provide these services. The current literature encompassing ICT, marketing and HR is reviewed and used as a guide for the design of the single case pilot study.

Findings

Overall, the results indicate that managers who perceive their expectations as being met, express satisfaction with the HR intranet and record increased satisfaction with the HR function. However, differences of perceptions emerge concerning this satisfaction between HR managers (i.e. suppliers) and other managers (i.e. customers). The findings also indicate that the effectiveness of communication concerning information about new technology (including that of training, marketing, user involvement and feedback) influences managers' perceptions of satisfaction with both the HR intranet and the HR function.

Research limitations/implications

These findings suggest that the intranet can play a powerful part in helping HR to build a closer and more satisfactory relationship with its customers in order to achieve mutual organisational benefit. However, this preliminary study also emphasises the need for further research on the impact and effectiveness of the HR intranet.

Originality/value

This paper begins the process of filling a substantial gap in the literature and provides a framework from which further research can be continued.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Graeme Johnson, Philip Wilding and Andrew Robson

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether an outsourced recruitment service can provide a satisfactory organisational solution from the perspective of its line…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether an outsourced recruitment service can provide a satisfactory organisational solution from the perspective of its line-managers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a single, large organisation involving dissemination of an on-line survey targeting line-managers with a recent record of hiring new employees. Using quantitative analysis including correlation, multiple regression and binary logistic regression, assessment is made regarding manager perception, including experience as customers, overall rating of the recruiter and a willingness to recommend the service.

Findings

Aspects of standard service, assessed in terms of operations and recruiter provision, are perceived as being at appropriately high levels, while the arguably more demanding external aspects of the recruitment process are perceived to be less successful. Line-manager satisfaction as customers and satisfaction with the recruiter are explained by various experiences of both service and recruiter, while willingness to recommend is explained in terms of customer satisfaction, satisfaction with the recruiter and recognition that the service provides added value. Personal line-manager experiences, perceived realisation of organisational values or achieving preferred line-manager recruitment objectives play no significant part in these explanations.

Research limitations/implications

The research considered an individual organisation, with participating managers being solely from within. Further research could see the assessment being extended to other organisations perhaps at different points of maturity in their relationships with an external recruitment partner, as well as revisiting the participating organisation at a later point in time to assess potential changes in the relationships assessed.

Practical implications

To enhance line-manager satisfaction with service and with the recruiter, aspects of process and recruiter contribution both play a role, while these satisfaction indicators, in tandem with an appreciation of added value will prompt a line-manager to ultimately recommend such a service.

Originality/value

This centres on the assessment of an outsourced recruitment service from the particular perspective of its hiring line-managers, through evaluation of service satisfaction and willingness to recommend.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Ying Chen, Ray Friedman and Tony Simons

Voluntary employee turnover can be a challenge for all industries but high employee turnover has been a special concern in the hospitality industry, which is the context…

Abstract

Purpose

Voluntary employee turnover can be a challenge for all industries but high employee turnover has been a special concern in the hospitality industry, which is the context of this paper. The purpose of this paper is to incorporate a “trickle-down” perspective into the conventional research on turnover intention and satisfaction with supervision. The authors assess whether mid-level managerssatisfaction with senior managers’ supervision is related positively to line employees’ satisfaction with mid-level managers’ supervision and, in turn, line employees’ turnover intentions. Further, the authors examine whether the strength of this “trickle-down” effect is affected by the middle managers’ gender.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested our theoretical argument using a sample of 1,527 full-time employees in 267 different departments at 94 hotels in the USA and Canada. Hierarchical linear modeling was employed to analyze the data.

Findings

The authors found a trickle-down effect of satisfaction with supervision, as predicted, and the effect was stronger for female than male middle managers. These findings open new avenues for addressing turnover issues for organizations and managers.

Originality/value

This study extends the line of research on leadership and turnover in three ways. First, it shows how senior managers, who have no direct contact with line employees, can affect turnover intentions of line employees. Second, this research helps the authors know where to target efforts at intervention; by connecting middle managerssatisfaction with supervision with employees’ turnover intentions, the authors know to target interventions to reduce turnover not just at line employees and supervisors but also at senior-level managers as well. Third, this study sheds light on the ongoing debate over “female advantage” in leadership (Eagly and Carli, 2003a, b; Vecchio, 2002, 2003) by examining not just how women are treated, but how their experience may reshape managerial dynamics.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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