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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Richard L. Miller and William A. Buxton

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of a self‐managed transition process on the performance of mid‐level managers, specifically company commanders serving…

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1210

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of a self‐managed transition process on the performance of mid‐level managers, specifically company commanders serving in the US Army.

Design/methodology/approach

The transition process provided the new commanders with a flexible outline of topics used for interviewing key personnel within the larger organization (battalion) prior to and immediately following assumption of command. The authors measured the performance of commanders using a standardized Battalion Command Evaluation Form completed by the battalion commander. In addition, the effects of leader experience and locus of control were examined.

Findings

It was found that use of the transition process enhanced the performance of company commanders who had an external locus of control and/or did not come directly from a job proximal to command.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides a model that can be used with mid‐level managers in order to minimize the performance deficit often associated with turnover.

Originality/value

Most research on managerial transition has focused on upper‐level management. The paper examines mid‐level managerial turnover and provides new information about how means and opportunities can affect leader effectiveness.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

Eric G. Flamholtz

Introduction What do the following people each have in common:

Abstract

Introduction What do the following people each have in common:

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Yaffa Moskovich

This paper aims to develop a managerial style typology relevant to kibbutz industry analysis and applicable to all cooperative organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a managerial style typology relevant to kibbutz industry analysis and applicable to all cooperative organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applied qualitative methods to evaluate the organizational biographies of Factories five factories, using open interviews and document analysis.

Findings

The findings show that before privatization took place, these industries were managed according to socialistic democratic principles. Once they became global and capitalistic, some kibbutz industries adopted a business cooperative style that combines features of capitalism and socialism, while others underwent a crisis and opted for a stricter and more bureaucratic managerial style.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on five case studies; further research is recommended to establish the current typology.

Practical implications

This study shows very clearly that the cooperative business style can be offered for businesses previously operated according to socialistic principles.

Originality/value

This study augments current literature by elucidating the speed with which business activity is conducted according to cooperative principles. It presents a typology relevant to kibbutz industry and cooperative organizations alike, addressing the cooperative managerial, cooperative business and bureaucratic styles, enabling maintenance of normative management that adapts itself to global and capitalistic environments.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Charles J. Margerison

The differing levels of experience existing within career development require identification and differentiation in their training requirements. A model defining eight…

Abstract

The differing levels of experience existing within career development require identification and differentiation in their training requirements. A model defining eight such levels, from initial training experience through to corporate and political experience, is useful, and some of the work based on the action learning format provides sound guidelines. Gordon Wills has demonstrated that such learning can be incorporated into a practical educational structure at postgraduate level through involving companies in sponsoring individuals to work on key projects as the central element in their learning. These directions must be considered in future so that management education and development might ally in helping managers effect the transition between managerial levels.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2003

Claudio Morrison

This article analyses the issue of discipline violations in a Russian textile company. Discipline violations proliferated in Soviet times and were tolerated by managers…

Abstract

This article analyses the issue of discipline violations in a Russian textile company. Discipline violations proliferated in Soviet times and were tolerated by managers. The cause has been identified in the limited form of control exercised over the production process, resulting from the social relations existing in the Soviet Union. Evidence from the case study indicates that no fundamental change has occurred in this area since the transition. The research documents the material and psychological hardships experienced by workers, the relational practices constraining line managers, and it tries to discern the conceptual and operative limits of disciplinary campaigns by top management.

Details

Anthropological Perspectives on Economic Development and Integration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-071-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Heiko Gebauer and Thomas Friedli

This paper attempts to provide a better understanding of behavioral processes and their impact on the transition from products to services.

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5437

Abstract

Purpose

This paper attempts to provide a better understanding of behavioral processes and their impact on the transition from products to services.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies are the main tool of theory development. The paper focuses mainly on German and Swiss product manufacturers, whose products require a high level of customer investment.

Findings

The objective was merely to explain behavioral dimension of transition. The paper indicated seven behavioral processes which play a critical role during the transition. Managerial service awareness and role understanding, as well as employee service awareness and role understanding seem to be the right triggers to change the behavioral processes in the desired manner.

Research limitations/implications

The main focus was on the German and Swiss machinery and medical equipment manufacturing industries, and the remarks are limited to these sectors.

Practical implications

The key managerial implications and recommendations can be formulated as follows: establish a “value‐added” managerial service awareness; change managerial role understanding – from traditional customer support to business manager; establish a “value‐added” employee service awareness; and change employee role understanding – from selling products to providing services.

Originality/value

The authors were able to add a complementary perspective to existing literature on the transition process from products to services. For service management theorists, it is suggested that the transition from product manufacturers into service providers is influenced strongly by several behavioral processes. A complete theory of the transition process requires an interdisciplinary theory that integrates service management and human decision making.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Yannick Dillen, Eddy Laveren, Rudy Martens, Sven De Vocht and Eric Van Imschoot

Few high-growth firms (HGFs) are able to maintain high-growth over time. The purpose of this paper is to find out why only a small number of firms become persistent HGFs…

Abstract

Purpose

Few high-growth firms (HGFs) are able to maintain high-growth over time. The purpose of this paper is to find out why only a small number of firms become persistent HGFs, explicitly focusing on the role of the founding entrepreneur in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Initially, 28 semi-structured interviews were performed with high-growth entrepreneurs to discover why so few founders could become persistent high-growth entrepreneurs. In a second phase, four case studies were conducted to uncover the factors that facilitate a swift evolution from the “managerial” role to the “strategic” role.

Findings

High-growth entrepreneurs, who quickly make a transition from a managerial role into a strategic role are more likely to keep their firm on its high-growth trajectory. This transition is made possible by: the early development of strategic skills; the presence of a high quality human capital base; and an organizational structure with characteristics from Mintzberg’s “machine bureaucracy.”

Practical implications

The results are vital for entrepreneurs of “one-shot” HGFs with the ambition to make their firm a “persistent” HGF. If high-growth rates are to be sustained, the three factors that emerged from the authors’ analysis should foster the delegation of managerial tasks, resulting in an easier transition toward a “strategic role.”

Originality/value

Insights are valuable as both founders and governmental institutions can benefit from knowing which factors contribute to a successful phase transition from “manager” to “strategist.”

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Ivan Spehar, Jan C Frich and Lars Erik Kjekshus

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate how clinicians’ professional background influences their transition into the managerial role and identity as clinical managers.

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4251

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how clinicians’ professional background influences their transition into the managerial role and identity as clinical managers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interviewed and observed 30 clinicians in managerial positions in Norwegian hospitals.

Findings

A central finding was that doctors experienced difficulties in reconciling the role as health professional with the role as manager. They maintained a health professional identity and reported to find meaning and satisfaction from clinical work. Doctors also emphasized clinical work as a way of gaining legitimacy and respect from medical colleagues. Nurses recounted a faster and more positive transition into the manager role, and were more fully engaged in the managerial aspects of the role.

Practical implications

The authors advance that health care organizations need to focus on role, identity and need satisfaction when recruiting and developing clinicians to become clinical managers.

Originality/value

The study suggests that the inclusion of aspects from identity and need satisfaction literature expands on and enriches the study of clinical managers.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Hai Guo, Jintong Tang and Zelong Wei

By integrating the resource management perspective and the optimal distinctiveness perspective, the purpose of this paper is to explain how firms configure their managerial

Abstract

Purpose

By integrating the resource management perspective and the optimal distinctiveness perspective, the purpose of this paper is to explain how firms configure their managerial ties and competences to identify entrepreneurial opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data collected from 238 firms in a transition economy, this paper tests a model of firms’ exploration and exploitation competences under which managerial ties promote or constrain opportunity discovery.

Findings

The paper finds that managerial ties are positively related to opportunity discovery. More importantly, competence exploration strengthens the impact of business ties on opportunity discovery, whereas it weakens the impact of political ties. On the contrary, competence exploitation strengthens the effect of political ties on opportunity discovery, whereas it weakens the impact of business ties.

Originality/value

First, the findings enrich the social network perspective of opportunity recognition by linking managerial social ties to opportunity discovery in the context of a transition economy. Second, this paper adds to current understanding of the resource management perspective and the optimal distinctiveness perspective by exploring the fit between different managerial ties (business ties vs political ties) and different competences (exploration vs exploitation) in contributing to opportunity discovery.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2009

Mike W. Peng and J. Martina Quan

One of the leading themes emerging out of recent management and organization research on China is the work on the micro–macro link – specifically, the connection between…

Abstract

One of the leading themes emerging out of recent management and organization research on China is the work on the micro–macro link – specifically, the connection between micro, interpersonal connections, ties, and networks on the one hand, and macro, interorganizational relationships, firm strategies, and performance on the other hand. This chapter provides an overview of the literature on the micro–macro link during China's institutional transitions. Based on a systematic search of the literature, we review 22 papers in nine leading journals that have empirically investigated the micro–macro link, with a focus on the antecedents, contingencies, and outcomes of managerial ties and interlocking directorates. We also propose how the network structure of managerial ties will evolve from cohesion to structural holes in different phases of China's institutional transitions. We conclude with a brief overview of the influence of China studies on research in other contexts and with a call for future research deepening our understanding of the crucial micro–macro link during institutional transitions.

Details

Work and Organizationsin China Afterthirty Years of Transition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-730-7

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