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Article
Publication date: 26 May 2021

Charles Carvalho, Fallan Kirby Carvalho and Sheldon Carvalho

In this paper, we provide a brief understanding of the field of managerial coaching, specifically, offering insights on what has been studied and ideas on where the field…

773

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, we provide a brief understanding of the field of managerial coaching, specifically, offering insights on what has been studied and ideas on where the field can move forward.

Design/methodology/approach

We review managerial coaching research, focusing in particular on its consequences and determinants. Based on the review, we uncover three areas that will help advance the development of managerial coaching research.

Findings

Our review indicates that both individual and contextual factors influence managerial coaching. Managerial coaching is beneficial not only for employees but also for managers who engage in coaching and the teams they manage. Despite the overwhelmingly positive view of managerial coaching, emerging research addresses the detrimental effects of coaching on managers who engage in coaching. We call on researchers to undertake more work on the factors that reduce managers’ inclination to coach, dark side outcomes of coaching, and role of individual and contextual factors in influencing the effects of coaching.

Originality/value

By reviewing extant managerial coaching research as well as suggesting fruitful avenues for researchers to explore, this paper serves as a useful guide for scholars interested in contributing to the emerging body of research on managerial coaching.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Chin Wei Chong, Yee Yen Yuen, Booi Chen Tan, Zainal Abu Zarim and Norhasniza Abdul Hamid

This paper aims to identify the key competencies managerial coaches have and examine the significant competencies that affect coaching effectiveness in the Malaysian…

1126

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the key competencies managerial coaches have and examine the significant competencies that affect coaching effectiveness in the Malaysian telecommunications industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The unit of analysis was individual managerial coaches who were working in the Malaysian telecommunications industry. Among the 300 questionnaires distributed, a total of 140 were obtained and deemed sufficiently complete to be useable. Descriptive and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The results indicated that leadership development is the most important function of managerial coaching, followed by communication. In addition, co-creating the relationship and effective communication are the critical categories of competencies for managerial coaching. Analysis from the regression highlighted that effective communication is the influencing factor on the coaching effectiveness, followed by facilitating learning, and results. The findings also shown that all the core competencies in setting foundation are the significant influencing factors.

Research limitations/implications

Analyses relied on cross-sectional data and limits the generalizability of findings to other industries. The utilization of self-reported perceptual data may suffer from response bias.

Practical implications

This paper highlights personal or professional coaching characteristics that might affect managerial leadership development. It also provides a list of important criteria for developing effective managerial coaching to assist Malaysian managerial coaches to build a world class workforce.

Originality/value

Using International Coach Foundation competency model, this study provides an insight on the important criteria to develop and select coaching managers effectively which ultimately lead to performance improvement in the organization.

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Andrea D. Ellinger, Robert G. Hamlin and Rona S. Beattie

The concept of managers assuming developmental roles such as coaches and learning facilitators has received considerable attention in recent years. Yet, despite the…

6081

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of managers assuming developmental roles such as coaches and learning facilitators has received considerable attention in recent years. Yet, despite the growing body of expert opinion that suggests that coaching is an essential core activity of everyday management and leadership, the literature base remains largely atheoretical and devoid of empirical research. While there is some consensus about what effective coaching looks like, little if any empirical research has examined ineffective coaching behaviours. The purpose of this paper is to compare the empirical findings from three separately conducted studies to derive a comprehensive understanding of the ineffective behaviours associated with managerial coaching.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study adopted a cross‐national “etic” methodology based on the empirical findings generated by three previously conducted and purposefully selected “emic” studies. Drawing on Berry's and Lyons and Chryssochoous' “emic‐etic” approach and cross‐cultural comparisons, the researchers employed Guba and Lincoln's file card approach to analyze and compare the three behavioral datasets of the previously conducted studies.

Findings

The findings from this cross‐national comparative “etic” study revealed that the vast majority of ineffective coaching behaviours previously identified in the emic studies were held in common with each other. The predominant ineffective behaviours included using an autocratic, directive, controlling or dictatorial style, ineffective communication and dissemination of information, and inappropriate behaviours and approaches to working with employees. Of the 17 ineffective behaviours that were compared only three were not held in common.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations associated with this cross‐national study included minor variations in the use of data collection approaches and samples of managers in the previously conducted emic studies.

Practical implications

The ineffective managerial coaching behaviours derived from the cross‐national comparisons can be integrated as diagnostic tools into coaching training programmes and management and leadership development programmes to improve the practice of managerial coaching. They can also be used to increase managers' awareness of the behaviours that impede their coaching interventions with their respective employees.

Originality/value

The literature base on coaching in general and managerial coaching in particular has been criticized for not being research‐informed and evidence‐based, but rather predominantly practice‐driven and guru‐led. The findings from the current cross‐national etic study not only add to a sparse base of empirical research on managerial coaching, but also illuminate an underdeveloped area, namely that of ineffective managerial coaching practice. Furthermore, the findings provide a foundation on which to compare and contrast future empirical research that may be conducted on managerial coaching behaviours.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Makoto Matsuo

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of team and individual reflexivity in linking managerial coaching with individual learning.

1702

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of team and individual reflexivity in linking managerial coaching with individual learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Data obtained from 506 individuals in 98 engineering teams in the automobile and electronic industries were used to investigate specific hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that managerial coaching directly influenced team learning and individual learning, team reflexivity acted as substantial mediator for the relationship between managerial coaching and team learning, as well as the relationship between managerial coaching and individual reflexivity and team reflexivity and individual reflexivity co-acted each other as mediators for the relationship between managerial coaching and individual learning.

Research limitations/implications

As the subjects of this study were engineering teams in which tasks are interdependent, there is a possibility that the task trait may have affected the results.

Practical implications

Managers should recognize the importance of collectively reflective activities in promoting both individual and team learning. Facilitating coaching skills are indispensable to enhance reflexivity within teams.

Originality/value

This study extends prior research by demonstrating the mediating role of team and individual reflexivity as mediators in linking managerial coaching to team and individual learning, which has never been investigated in previous studies.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Beth Adele, Andrea D. Ellinger, Rochell R. McWhorter and Toby M. Egan

As a part of a larger study, the purpose of this study was to explore the learning outcomes for the “manager as coach” when exemplary managers are engaged in coaching

Abstract

Purpose

As a part of a larger study, the purpose of this study was to explore the learning outcomes for the “manager as coach” when exemplary managers are engaged in coaching their respective employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, multi-case study using an adaptation of the critical incident technique (CIT) and semistructured interviews was employed with 12 managers and their respective direct reports totaling 24 interviews. Content and constant comparative analyses were used to analyze the data.

Findings

A total of five themes and 19 subthemes were identified regarding managers’ learning outcomes from managers’ perspectives. From the perspectives of their employees as coachees regarding their managers’ learning outcomes, one theme with three subthemes emerged.

Originality/value

Limited empirical research has explored the developmental outcomes for managers who serve as coaches for their employees. This study examined the outcomes associated with managerial coaching from both the perspectives of the managers who coach and their direct reports. The findings of this research provide more insight into the benefits managers derive from coaching their employees.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Andrea D. Ellinger and Alexander E. Ellinger

The purpose of this paper and the contribution to this special issue is to build on Kim and Watkins’ (2018) recent finding that ‘leaders mentor and coach those they lead…

1480

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper and the contribution to this special issue is to build on Kim and Watkins’ (2018) recent finding that ‘leaders mentor and coach those they lead’ is the item in the Dimensions of the Learning Organization Questionnaire (DLOQ) that is most highly-correlated with performance. Given the criticality of providing strategic leadership for learning and, more specifically, the consistent associations between leaders who mentor and coach and work-related performance outcomes, a better understanding of the associations between the learning organization concept and managerial coaching is warranted. Watkins and Kim (2018, p. 22) contend that ‘future directions for learning organization research include a search for the elusive interventions that would create a learning organization’. In response to this call for research, a research agenda for assessing managerial coaching as a learning organization (LO) intervention is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper briefly reviews literature on the learning organization and the DLOQ instrument, followed by a more in-depth review of the managerial coaching literature and suggestions for how future research could be conducted that more closely integrates these two concepts.

Findings

Existing literature suggests that to ‘provide strategic leadership for learning’, a dimension in the DLOQ, is one of the most pivotal dimensions for creating learning cultures that build learning organizations. Specifically, an item within this dimension, ‘leaders who mentor and coach’ has been recently identified as one of the most critical aspects associated with strategic leadership for learning.

Originality/value

The extant managerial coaching literature offers a solid foundation for more closely integrating and mainstreaming the developmental intervention of managerial coaching into learning organizations. Directions for future research that identifies fine-grained perspectives of the discrete facets of managerial coaching in learning organization contexts are suggested.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2018

Claudio Pousa, Timothy Hardie and Xiaodi Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to test the influence of managerial coaching on frontline employee customer orientation, sales orientation and performance in a Chinese…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the influence of managerial coaching on frontline employee customer orientation, sales orientation and performance in a Chinese context. Further to this first goal, the authors also aim to compare these results with those obtained with a sample of Canadian bank employees in order to understand to what extent differences between Eastern and Western cultures affect business practices and employee responses in both environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper replicates a study from 2014 that used a sample of Canadian financial advisors to test the impact of managerial coaching on customer orientation, sales orientation and performance. In this new study, 185 frontline employees from a large insurance company in Chongqing (China) answered a paper-and-pencil questionnaire in Mandarin providing information about the coaching received from their managers, their own customer and sales orientation, as well as performance. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling in AMOS as well as multigroup confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate cross-cultural differences.

Findings

The authors found that for the Chinese respondents managerial coaching is positively related to employee performance both directly and through the mediation effect of customer orientation. The authors found no support for the mediation of sales orientation between coaching and performance. These results suggest that managerial coaching might be a good strategy to promote relational behaviors in frontline employees, but not to reduce manipulative behaviors. The authors also found that these results are statistically equivalent for Chinese and Canadian respondents, suggesting that cultural differences are less prevalent than expected in this business sector.

Research limitations/implications

The study makes several contributions to research. First, it suggests that managerial coaching can help employees develop their customer orientation–a central construct for commercial organizations working under a relational marketing approach. Second, it presents one of the first studies that evaluate the efficiency of managerial coaching in an Eastern country. And finally, results underline the equivalence of results for Eastern (China) and Western (Canada) respondents suggesting that in a global environment (like the financial industry) the business logic guiding the development of good customer relationships and employee customer-oriented behaviors prevails over potential cultural differences and makes leader and employee behaviors more similar and comparable across different regions in the world.

Practical implications

First, the use of managerial coaching seems to increase frontline employee relational behaviors, like customer orientation. Accordingly, managerial coaching seems to be a link that can help financial institutions bridge the formulation of a marketing relational strategy in the boardroom and the implementation of such a strategy at the customer interface between frontline employees and customers. Second, given the equivalence of results between the Canadian and the Chinese sample, it seems that the similarities between business models and business logics within the financial services sector are more important—and supersede—the potential cross-cultural differences between Eastern and Western countries.

Originality/value

The study makes a contribution to the limited literature on the use of managerial coaching in financial institutions to increase frontline employee relational behaviors. At the same time, it presents one of the few cross-cultural studies comparing results obtained from Chinese and Canadian respondents.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

William S. Carrell, Andrea D. Ellinger, Kim F. Nimon and Sewon Kim

The purpose of this study was to apply social exchange and organizational support theories to examine the relationship between mid-level strategic enrollment managers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to apply social exchange and organizational support theories to examine the relationship between mid-level strategic enrollment managers’ perceptions of managerial coaching behaviors enacted by their senior managers and their own reported job engagement, as mediated by perceived organizational support (POS) within the US higher education context.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey-based half-longitudinal design, which used the latent marker variable technique, was conducted with a sponsoring professional organization in the strategic enrollment management (SEM) field in the USA. A total of 301 usable surveys were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that SEM managers’ job engagement and the perceived managerial coaching behaviors provided to them by their senior managers were positively correlated, and that POS fully mediated this relationship. These findings highlight how coaching behaviors may allow managers to elicit positive emotional responses and, by fostering enhanced POS, ultimately enhance job engagement among their team members.

Originality/value

This study addresses several calls for research on managerial coaching, job engagement and POS in an under-examined higher education context within the human resource development field.

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Makoto Matsuo and Takami Matsuo

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of managerial coaching, as well as interactive and diagnostic uses of management control systems (MCS), on…

1005

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of managerial coaching, as well as interactive and diagnostic uses of management control systems (MCS), on reflection and critical reflection, which are important for team learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a questionnaire survey. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to test hypotheses using data from 235 employees in 50 teams from a Japanese automotive supplier.

Findings

The results indicated that: MCS used interactively have a positive influence on critical reflection in teams; MCS used diagnostically have no significant effect on reflection or critical reflection in teams; and managerial coaching has a positive influence on team reflection.

Research limitations/implications

These findings suggest that the interactive use of MCS should be combined with managerial coaching in promoting reflection and critical reflection within teams. Because this study used data from employees of a Japanese automotive supplier, the results may have been influenced by the Japanese management style.

Practical implications

Organizations need to implement interactive MCS at the team level, while coaching programs should be provided for managers to enhance team learning.

Originality/value

This study extends the existing literature by examining the effect of MCS at the team level, and identifying that managerial coaching plays a complementary role, supporting the interactive use of MCS in promoting reflection within a team.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Claudio Pousa, Anne Mathieu and Carole Trépanier

The impact of managerial coaching on frontline employee performance has received initial support in literature in recent years. However, no studies have explored if this…

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Abstract

Purpose

The impact of managerial coaching on frontline employee performance has received initial support in literature in recent years. However, no studies have explored if this impact should vary according to the career stage that the employee is in. If an interaction effect exists, then managers should expect different results when coaching people in different stages of their careers. Otherwise, all employees (independently of their career stage) can benefit from the positive impact of coaching and, thus, the manager can expect a continuous positive outcome on employee performance throughout their careers. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate the moderation effect of an employee’s career stage on the relationship between managerial coaching and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 318 financial advisors from two Canadian banks was used to collect data on the amount, and quality, of managerial coaching received by the employees, as well as their performance. multigroup confirmatory factor analysis ran in AMOS was used to test the moderation effect of experience.

Findings

Results confirmed the positive effect of managerial coaching on frontline employee behavioral and sales performance, but no moderation effect was found. The measuring and causal models showed invariance for employees in their early (one to seven years of selling experience), middle (8-15 years), and late (more than 15 years) career stages, suggesting that managerial coaching will make a consistent contribution to performance throughout all the stages of the employee’s career.

Research limitations/implications

The study makes two main contributions to the scientific literature. First, it offers an original study examining the effect of managerial coaching on frontline employee performance in the banking sector. Second, it examines the role of selling experience as a moderator in coaching processes, thus contributing to the limited literature on career stages.

Practical implications

The study suggests that managers should equally devote their coaching efforts to all employees, independently of their selling experience. Contrary to the belief that rookies will benefit more from coaching, and that “you cannot teach an old dog new tricks,” results suggest that managerial coaching makes a continuous contribution to performance throughout all the stages of an employee’s career.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the moderation effect of selling experience on coaching consequences, and one of the few to present evidence of the positive effect of managerial coaching on frontline employee performance in the banking sector.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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