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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Karen Bargate

University Accountancy faculty need criteria to assist with the selection of textbooks, to ensure that the subject matter is congruent with the level at which students are…

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Abstract

Purpose

University Accountancy faculty need criteria to assist with the selection of textbooks, to ensure that the subject matter is congruent with the level at which students are taught. Readability is one such criterion. The purpose of this study is to assess the readability of two Managerial Accounting and two Financial Management textbooks, using three different readability evaluation methods.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample for the study included 281 Accounting students from an Eastern seaboard university. Each student was requested to complete two passages – one from a Management Accounting textbook and one from a Financial Management textbook. The Gunning Fog Index, Flesch Reading Ease and Cloze Procedure readability evaluation methods were used to measure readability.

Findings

The findings suggest varying levels of readability among the textbooks. Results from the Cloze Procedure reveal that three of the four textbooks were being read at the Frustration Level and the fourth marginally above the Frustration Level. The readability formulae returned varying results demonstrating that some of the textbooks were at a level that the students ought to be able to read.

Research limitations/implications

Only two Managerial Accounting and two Financial Management textbooks of many published were assessed, and only three readability evaluation methods were used.

Social implications

The findings have implications for university faculty, authors, publishers, editors and students.

Originality/value

The readability of Managerial Accounting and Financial Management textbooks used at South African universities, has received scant attention in the literature. The analysis of the readability of the accounting textbooks, presents a synthesis that adds important knowledge in this under‐researched topic.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Bea Chiang

This chapter provides an innovative way to introduce a series of managerial assignments that will allow students to take an example of a real company that interests them…

Abstract

This chapter provides an innovative way to introduce a series of managerial assignments that will allow students to take an example of a real company that interests them and answer questions designated by the instructor. The assignments are individualized to let students choose their area of interest and apply accounting concepts. At the same time, the instructor formulates questions for students to answer based on the materials covered. This chapter also provides an implementation process and student feedback.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-851-8

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Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2015

C. Andrew Lafond and Kristin Wentzel

The subject area of the assignment is cost accumulation. This instructional tool enhances coverage of cost accumulation topics in graduate level Introductory to Management

Abstract

Purpose

The subject area of the assignment is cost accumulation. This instructional tool enhances coverage of cost accumulation topics in graduate level Introductory to Management Accounting courses.

Methodology/approach

The assignment entails visiting a small business and interviewing the owner to learn about the company’s process for determining costs of products and/or services. Such active learning hones leadership and critical thinking skills by requiring students to employ interviewing and listening techniques as they act as business advisors to discuss cost accumulation processes with small business owners. The assignment provides flexibility since a range of business types can be used from a landscaping business operated out of one’s garage to a mid-size manufacturing company.

Findings

Students see how a small business accumulates costs and gain experience analyzing the effectiveness of cost accumulation systems and providing recommendations.

Practical implications

A list of supplementary materials is included, covering teaching notes, assessment data, and grading rubrics.

Originality/value

Student feedback suggests that students value the opportunity to engage in a realistic exercise that allows them to draw linkages between textbook material and the real world, while also acting in a consulting role to apply class concepts to small businesses. Furthermore, assessment data based on grading rubrics indicate that all students meet or exceed instructor expectations, thus increasing the viable use of this course project.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-587-7

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-052-1

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Brian Knox

Managerial accounting education generally insists that managers should never consider sunk costs. This suggestion seems inconsistent with a common mode of thinking about…

Abstract

Purpose

Managerial accounting education generally insists that managers should never consider sunk costs. This suggestion seems inconsistent with a common mode of thinking about future rewards: quasi-hyperbolic discounting. This paper aims to explore the conflict between sunk cost consideration and quasi-hyperbolic discounting and to illustrate when sunk cost consideration may be appropriate.

Design/methodology/approach

The author conducted three numerical experiments, i.e. simulated experiments based on analytical models, to demonstrate how it can be beneficial to consider sunk costs in some circumstances. All three numerical experiments assume quasi-hyperbolic discounting. First, the author tested considering sunk costs with future rewards that are certain. Second, the author tested considering sunk costs with uncertain future rewards. Finally, the author tested two different educational interventions to change decision-makers’ thought patterns.

Findings

The author found that considering sunk costs worsens decisions when there is bad news and improves them when there is good news. The author found that an educational intervention that partially dissuades managers from considering sunk costs improves decisions when bad news arrives and worsens them when good news arrives. The author also found that an educational intervention that reduces uncertainty improves decisions when bad news arrives and does not worsen these decisions when good news arrives.

Originality/value

The author provided numerical examples of situations in which considering sunk costs is valuable. The findings on educational interventions provide information about the tradeoffs of teaching that sunk costs should never be considered.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Emmett Steed and Zheng Gu

The purpose of this study is to investigate and document current US hotel management company practices in budgeting and forecasting, and to recommend a process to improve…

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8573

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate and document current US hotel management company practices in budgeting and forecasting, and to recommend a process to improve accuracy and efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

Key corporate financial executives of hotel management companies operating in the USA were surveyed. Different from prior studies that surveyed the US property‐level managers, or European hotel operators, the study surveyed the authors of budget guidelines of US hotel management companies with at least ten units or 1,000 rooms, to discover and document the budgeting and forecasting practices of multi‐unit hotel management companies. Chi‐square and t‐tests for equality of means were used to identify the differences between large and small hotel management companies.

Findings

Many concepts were identified that are not found in hospitality management textbooks. Current budgeting and forecasting methods used in the industry present opportunities for improving accuracy. There are also opportunities for time efficiencies, which may lead to improved participant satisfaction. Some significant differences were identified in budgeting and forecasting processes between large and small management companies.

Research limitations/implications

The findings may not apply to independently owned and operated hotels, or small hotel management companies. Future research may focus on identifying economic factors that most influence hotel revenues at the local or regional level. Also, future research may focus on corporate computer software that facilitates intranet consolidation of property level budgets and forecasts and also allows spreadsheet flexibility for exploring various scenarios.

Practical implications

The practical application of the study is the recommendation for a centralized budget process that enhances accuracy, improves efficiency, and reduces “gamesmanship”.

Original/value

There are four main contributions of the study: the obtaining of inputs from corporate officers of hotel management companies with operations in the USA; the documenting of forecasting and budgeting practices of hotel management companies operating in the USA; the recommending of a forecasting and budgeting process that may improve accuracy and participant satisfaction; and the identifying of differences between large and small companies in relation to forecasting and budgeting practices.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2010

M. Christian Mastilak and Michele Matherly

In managerial accounting courses, students lacking business experience find the balanced scorecard (BSC) an inherently difficult topic to understand. Students may lack an…

Abstract

In managerial accounting courses, students lacking business experience find the balanced scorecard (BSC) an inherently difficult topic to understand. Students may lack an understanding of business strategy, the BSC's perspectives, and the measures that a BSC uses to report performance. This chapter aims to assist instructors who teach the BSC by developing an analogy to a resume, which is a familiar concept to students. The analogy draws upon similarities between the BSC and a well-constructed resume: a cohesive strategy, multiple perspectives or areas, and multiple types of measures for each area. In using this approach, the instructor guides students through the process of viewing a resume as a vehicle for conveying a job-search strategy, similar to the way a BSC communicates an organization's strategy. Thus, students can apply their knowledge of the familiar (their own resumes) to the unfamiliar (the BSC). The chapter provides implementation guidance and results of student surveys. Our students responded positively to the exercise, saying that they learned the basics of the BSC, and even found the exercise enjoyable.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-292-1

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Case study
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Linda A. Hall, Jayanti Bandyopadhyay and Susan McNamara

This case illustrates the implications of the business challenges faced by an on‐campus student‐run convenience store when an internationally known coffee company opened a…

Abstract

Synopsis

This case illustrates the implications of the business challenges faced by an on‐campus student‐run convenience store when an internationally known coffee company opened a competing store. The case exercises focus on the application of managerial accounting concepts relevant for future strategic decision making. Students have the task of extracting relevant data from descriptive information. Using the story of an actual student‐run coffee shop that confronted an emerging competitor and thus necessitating these analyses can provide an attractive alternative to teaching managerial accounting concepts that are often considered by students as “dry.”

Research methodology

Case information was obtained from actual student organization and university data slightly modified to facilitate calculation and application of managerial accounting topics. Identities of the institution, the student run store and the international competitor have been disguised at their request. Certain events and dates have been altered to protect identities.

Relevant courses and levels

Relevant courses include but are not limited to: Introductory Managerial Accounting and Cost Accounting at the undergraduate business or accounting and the graduate MBA level.

Theoretical basis

Teaching opportunities include the application of managerial accounting concepts relevant for future strategic decision making. Topics include cost‐volume‐profit, sales‐mix, and break‐even analyses, conversion of traditional income statements to contribution margin income statements, and internal control issues.

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Adele Berndt and Jane P. Wayland

Locally authored textbooks are used at tertiary South African institutions to assist in marketing research studies. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

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193

Abstract

Purpose

Locally authored textbooks are used at tertiary South African institutions to assist in marketing research studies. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the readability of locally authored marketing research textbooks in South Africa and compare them with international (USA) texts.

Design/methodology/approach

South African marketing research textbooks (authored locally) used at South African institutions were identified. Electronic versions of the textbooks were used and analysed using accepted readability formulae. The same procedure was used with texts produced in the USA and the findings of each were compared.

Findings

The South Africa texts scored higher on the Flesch Reading Ease score than US texts, which links to the target audience of these books (undergraduate students), while also being cognisant of the reading skills of the target audience but their score still describes them as “difficult”.

Research limitations/implications

The original formulae and theory tend to be dated, though there are recent studies into readability in other areas of business studies. There are also those that question the applicability of readability formulae in the tertiary environment.

Practical implications

Instructors need to ensure that material is at a suitable reading level to maximise the student's learning. For publishers and authors, this means that the examples and illustrations used need to be linked to the context in which the student lives and functions, and not just focus on the English used in the text.

Originality/value

While studies have been conducted into the readability of US textbooks, there is little published research into the readability of regional marketing research textbooks in other contexts to facilitate comparison.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Steven T. Schwartz, Eric E. Spires and Richard A. Young

The purpose of this note is to expose accounting students and others to recent findings in management control, specifically to the relationship between the informativeness…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this note is to expose accounting students and others to recent findings in management control, specifically to the relationship between the informativeness of a performance measure and its usefulness in performance evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

Numerical examples illuminate key ideas and are easy to follow and replicate by students.

Findings

Seemingly in contradiction to the controllability principle, performance measures that are informative about actions taken by employees are not necessarily useful for performance evaluation. This occurs when the performance being measured is related to an intermediate task, such as prepping items prior to final assembly. If prepping is an important factor in the quality of not only the intermediate good but also the finished good, and the quality of the finished good can be reasonably measured, it may not be useful to measure the prepping performance. This result holds even if obtaining the intermediate measure is costless and the intermediate measure provides unique information on the effort given to the intermediate task.

Originality/value

Opportunities to measure employees’ intermediate outputs are ubiquitous; therefore, judicious decisions should be made regarding the use of limited monitoring resources. This note contains intuitive, easy-to-follow illustrations (based on recent findings) that will help students and others identify situations where such evaluations are more and less useful.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

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