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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

M. Ronald Buckley, John E. Baur, Jay H. Hardy, III, James F. Johnson, Genevieve Johnson, Alexandra E. MacDougall, Christopher G. Banford, Zhanna Bagdasarov, David R. Peterson and Juandre Peacock

– The purpose of this paper was to identify examples of management lore currently in the organizational sciences.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to identify examples of management lore currently in the organizational sciences.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors deliberated and developed a series of examples of management lore in the organizational sciences and surveyed management practitioners concerning their beliefs in the lore hypothesized.

Findings

Pervasive beliefs that conflict with academic research exist in management practices. Although many of these ideas are commonly accepted as immutable facts, they may be based upon faulty logic, insufficient understanding of academic research, anecdotal evidence and an overdependence upon common sense. Buckley and Eder (1988) called these as examples of management lore. In this conceptual paper, we identify and discuss 12 examples of management lore that persist in day-to-day management practices. Topics we explore include personality, emotional intelligence, teams, compensation, goals, performance, work ethic, creativity and organizational citizenship behaviors.

Originality/value

A number of areas in which academic research gainsays what we believe to be an immutable fact.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Shawn Carraher

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1297

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Michael E. Raynor

The author points out that the same strategic behaviors that are associated with great success are also associated with failure. That is, the greatest rewards pose the

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2396

Abstract

Purpose

The author points out that the same strategic behaviors that are associated with great success are also associated with failure. That is, the greatest rewards pose the greatest risks. He explains how corporations should manage risk differently at different levels of responsibility using the concepts of Requisite Uncertainty and strategic flexibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The author reexamines two classic examples of marketing innovation, Betamax and Microsoft, and suggests that the cases actually offer an unconventional lesson about risk/reward. To illustrate best practice he examines the case of the Johnson & Johnson Development Corporation.

Findings

Companies that have achieved greatness have typically done so only at the cost of increased risk – something that has been ignored in much of established strategic thinking. The new frontier of value creation is therefore the management of risk through a portfolio of business models.

Practical implications

This article describes a new method for managing strategic risk. It explains how to place critical strategic unknowns at the center of the strategic conversation.

Originality/value

The author introduces the concepts of Requisite Uncertainty and strategic flexibility as new ways of managing risk and suggests they be added to the management toolkit. Together, they represent a departure from how management has traditionally tackled the future's irreducible uncertainty.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Rajugan Rajagopalapillai, Elizabeth Chang, Tharam S. Dillon and Ling Feng

In data engineering, view formalisms are used to provide flexibility to users and user applications by allowing them to extract and elaborate data from the stored data…

Abstract

In data engineering, view formalisms are used to provide flexibility to users and user applications by allowing them to extract and elaborate data from the stored data sources. Conversely, since the introduction of EXtensible Markup Language (XML), it is fast emerging as the dominant standard for storing, describing, and interchanging data among various web and heterogeneous data sources. In combination with XML Schema, XML provides rich facilities for defining and constraining user‐defined data semantics and properties, a feature that is unique to XML. In this context, it is interesting to investigate traditional database features, such as view models and view design techniques for XML. However, traditional view formalisms are strongly coupled to the data language and its syntax, thus it proves to be a difficult task to support views in the case of semi‐structured data models. Therefore, in this paper we propose a Layered View Model (LVM) for XML with conceptual and schemata extensions. Here our work is three‐fold; first we propose an approach to separate the implementation and conceptual aspects of the views that provides a clear separation of concerns, thus, allowing analysis and design of views to be separated from their implementation. Secondly, we define representations to express and construct these views at the conceptual level. Thirdly, we define a view transformation methodology for XML views in the LVM, which carries out automated transformation to a view schema and a view query expression in an appropriate query language. Also, to validate and apply the LVM concepts, methods and transformations developed, we propose a viewdriven application development framework with the flexibility to develop web and database applications for XML, at varying levels of abstraction.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1966

IAN FINCH

State encouraged monopolies are not among the easiest of institutions to evaluate. They provide on the one hand an enormous scope for the informed innovator, and on the…

Abstract

State encouraged monopolies are not among the easiest of institutions to evaluate. They provide on the one hand an enormous scope for the informed innovator, and on the other an equal scope (until detected) for the deft charlatan. When Bristol College of Science and Technology's School of Management ended its first intensive eight week course at Rockwell for training officers in October 1964, H. M. I. Stubbings remarked guardedly that he was grateful for any development. Within six months Rockwell's innovation had been rewarded with the Department of Education and Science imprimatur to develop the top end courses in the training hierarchy, and courses for training officers in skills analysis and the like had been pushed down to the level of the colleges of technology.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Céleste M. Brotheridge and Raymond T. Lee

This introduction aims to highlight the special contributions made by the articles in this issue in understanding how emotions are implicated in the process of managing.

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5801

Abstract

Purpose

This introduction aims to highlight the special contributions made by the articles in this issue in understanding how emotions are implicated in the process of managing.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents a model as a means of framing the discussion of the articles included in this issue.

Findings

Argues that emotions and emotional skills are essential for everyday managerial work and that the traditional stereotype of the exclusively rational manager has been replaced by one in which managers are expected to create and nourish positive relationships by effectively managing their own emotions and those of their employees.

Practical implications

Managers need to be aware of the impact that their expressed emotions have on their work units' emotional climate, their employees' emotions, their effectiveness as well as that of their employees, and the organization's overall success.

Originality/value

The paper offers insight into the emotions of managing.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Kathryn Ostermeier, Mark Davis and Robert Pavur

The purpose of this study is to examine the facilitating and inhibiting influence of team-level negative affectivity and conscientiousness on a dyad of emergent states…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the facilitating and inhibiting influence of team-level negative affectivity and conscientiousness on a dyad of emergent states, adopting and comparing both the composition and compilation perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected over three time points from 410 undergraduate students nested within cross-functional project teams (N = 62). The data, including individual self-reports and judges’ ratings of team performance, were aggregated to the team-level using both composition (mean) and compilation (skewness) approaches.

Findings

The findings indicate that mean-levels of negative affectivity were associated with decreased psychological safety. The use of skewed conscientiousness counterintuitively suggests too many highly conscientious members can also be detrimental to psychological safety. Psychological safety influences team potency and ultimately performance.

Originality/value

The results of this study highlight that the aggregation approach used is important. For example, the use of skewed (but not mean-level) conscientiousness brought an undetected and counterintuitive relationship to light. Future research should use compilation approaches in addition to composition approaches.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Wei Lu, Andrew MacFarlane and Fabio Venuti

Being an important data exchange and information storage standard, XML has generated a great deal of interest and particular attention has been paid to the issue of XML…

Abstract

Purpose

Being an important data exchange and information storage standard, XML has generated a great deal of interest and particular attention has been paid to the issue of XML indexing. Clear use cases for structured search in XML have been established. However, most of the research in the area is either based on relational database systems or specialized semi‐structured data management systems. This paper aims to propose a method for XML indexing based on the information retrieval (IR) system Okapi.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the paper reviews the structure of inverted files and gives an overview of the issues of why this indexing mechanism cannot properly support XML retrieval, using the underlying data structures of Okapi as an example. Then the paper explores a revised method implemented on Okapi using path indexing structures. The paper evaluates these index structures through the metrics of indexing run time, path search run time and space costs using the INEX and Reuters RVC1 collections.

Findings

Initial results on the INEX collections show that there is a substantial overhead in space costs for the method, but this increase does not affect run time adversely. Indexing results on differing sized Reuters RVC1 sub‐collections show that the increase in space costs with increasing the size of a collection is significant, but in terms of run time the increase is linear. Path search results show sub‐millisecond run times, demonstrating minimal overhead for XML search.

Practical implications

Overall, the results show the method implemented to support XML search in a traditional IR system such as Okapi is viable.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information on a method for XML indexing based on the IR system Okapi.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 61 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1974

NORMAN WILTSHIRE, IRENE KINGSTON, JOCK MURISON and JAMES G OLLÉ

THE BOUNDARIES have been set now and re‐organisation has come upon the public library world at its set date, approaching, occurring and passing on, like a lunar eclipse.

Abstract

THE BOUNDARIES have been set now and re‐organisation has come upon the public library world at its set date, approaching, occurring and passing on, like a lunar eclipse.

Details

New Library World, vol. 75 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Dunren Che and Wen‐Chi Hou

Efficient processing of XML queries is critical for XML data management and related applications. Previously proposed techniques are unsatisfactory. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Efficient processing of XML queries is critical for XML data management and related applications. Previously proposed techniques are unsatisfactory. The purpose of this paper is to present Determined – a new prototype system designed for XML query processing and optimization from a system perspective. With Determined, a number of novel techniques for XML query processing are proposed and demonstrated.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology emphasizes on query pattern minimization, logic‐level optimization, and efficient query execution. Accordingly, three lines of investigation have been pursued in the context of Determined: XML tree pattern query (TPQ) minimization; logic‐level XML query optimization utilizing deterministic transformation; and specialized algorithms for fast XML query execution.

Findings

Developed and demonstrated were: a runtime optimal and powerful algorithm for XML TPQ minimization; a unique logic‐level XML query optimization approach that solely pursues deterministic query transformation; and a group of specialized algorithms for XML query evaluation.

Research limitations/implications

The experiments conducted so far are still preliminary. Further in‐depth, thorough experiments thus are expected, ideally carried out in the setting of a real‐world XML DBMS system.

Practical implications

The techniques/approaches proposed can be adapted to real‐world XML database systems to enhance the performance of XML query processing.

Originality/value

The reported work integrates various novel techniques for XML query processing/optimization into a single system, and the findings are presented from a system perspective.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

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