Search results

1 – 10 of over 16000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Margitta Beil‐Hildebrand

The purpose of this article is to report on case study research conducted in a German hospital and describe the implications that the “Management by walking about”…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to report on case study research conducted in a German hospital and describe the implications that the “Management by walking about” approach had on healthcare employees. “Management by walking about” is widely seen as one of the favoured procedures for increasing employee commitment and shared understanding as well as supporting high trust work relations.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study set out to examine the actual labour processes and the concrete experiences of healthcare employees behind the “Management by walking about” approach in a German hospital. This was achieved by means of a six month field study of day‐to‐day life in the hospital's nursing division.

Findings

In this case study, the popular initiative of “Management by walking about” was used as a means of managerial control and, as such, the internal promotion of soaring values and path‐finding visions was met with both scepticism and cynicism.

Practical implications

Pre‐commitment and motivation levels were high among healthcare employees, they were passionate about their healthcare work and they actively engaged in open communication and organisational development. But all this had little to do with “Management by walking about”, and its implications raise questions about its influence on high trust work relations more generally.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that a more critical analysis is necessary to challenge the way in which “Management by walking about” is examined by healthcare management academics and practitioners.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1993

Charles Margerison

Management by Walking Around, Management Development, Teamwork,Training Examines possible methods which trainers might employ in orderto help improve management

Abstract

Management by Walking Around, Management Development, Teamwork, Training Examines possible methods which trainers might employ in order to help improve management performance and development. Suggests that management are their own worst enemies owing to the fact that they quite often lose contact with the actual workforce. Recommends various methods of avoiding this including “management by walking around” (MBWA), effective team development, and mixed level teams. Proposes several guidelines for encouraging teamwork suggesting that this is the way forward.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

David Sims

Draws on a large group of research projects on the management useof information systems in the British National Health Service. Arguesthat information systems are just one…

Abstract

Draws on a large group of research projects on the management use of information systems in the British National Health Service. Argues that information systems are just one part of the system of information by which the manager knows what is going on, and within which he or she constructs problems. Compares the advantages and disadvantages of four ways in which a manager may know about what is going on: information systems, gossip, walking about, and experience and imagination. Considers the effectiveness of these four for problem construction. Suggests that setting information systems in the context of other parts of the manager′s system of information may enable both the designers and the users of such systems to consider more carefully when and how their systems can be of use to senior managers in problem construction ‐ for it is more important for senior managers to be able to construct problems than to solve them.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Management walkabout has appealed to many chief executives as part of their management style. This article discusses some of the seldom‐considered implications of this…

Abstract

Management walkabout has appealed to many chief executives as part of their management style. This article discusses some of the seldom‐considered implications of this, and concludes with a recipe for genuinely effective management.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

R. Dobbins and B.O. Pettman

A self‐help guide to achieving success in business. Directed more towards the self‐employed, it is relevant to other managers in organizations. Divided into clear sections…

Abstract

A self‐help guide to achieving success in business. Directed more towards the self‐employed, it is relevant to other managers in organizations. Divided into clear sections on creativity and dealing with change; importance of clear goal setting; developing winning business and marketing strategies; negotiating skills; leadership; financial skills; and time management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

John A. Quelch, Paul W. Farris and James Olver

Reports on a survey of how product managers, experiencing increasedtime pressure, would like to spend their time compared with how theyactually spend it. Reviews the…

Abstract

Reports on a survey of how product managers, experiencing increased time pressure, would like to spend their time compared with how they actually spend it. Reviews the changes in the marketing environment currently exerting pressure on the product management system. Explains the implementation of a product management audit. Presents findings from actual audit surveys and shows how one company used an audit to identify and solve problems within its product management organization. Concludes that the product management audit is an excellent tool for producing hard data which may be missed by management by walking around.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Martin Fojt

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Leadership & Organization Development Journal is split into four sections covering abstracts under the following headings…

Abstract

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Leadership & Organization Development Journal is split into four sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Culture, Change and Intervention; Management Styles and Techniques; Leadership and Decision; Communications.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

David Cathmoir Nicoll

Reassesses the role of the grapevine in employee communications. Arguesthat it has a role to play in socializing employees to a company,initiating behavioural change…

Abstract

Reassesses the role of the grapevine in employee communications. Argues that it has a role to play in socializing employees to a company, initiating behavioural change, disciplining employees and providing information. Discusses the implementation of the grapevine as a part of the employee communications mix, through management by walking about (MBWA) and electronic communications. Concludes that it can enhance corporate culture and increases allegiance to corporate goals.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

J. Barton Cunningham and James S. Kempling

The purpose of this paper is to review the importance of various change principles in assisting change in three public sector organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the importance of various change principles in assisting change in three public sector organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers carried out interviews and used focus groups in assessing the principles and strategies which would be more useful.

Findings

The interview and focus group results in three public sector organizations suggest that forming a guiding coalition might be one of the most important principles to observe.

Research limitations/implications

The research data used for illustration are based on case evidence and the anecdotal interpretation of change in three settings. The paper does not claim to offer a scientific conclusion.

Practical implications

The goal is to encourage a discussion on whether or not certain principles or strategies should be more important.

Originality/value

The paper reviews the literature on change and reviews these principles in real experiences. Much of the other literature is conceptual.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 November 2010

Michael A. Crumpton

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the benefits of being visible in stewardship of an organization and the resources invested.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the benefits of being visible in stewardship of an organization and the resources invested.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at the concepts of management by walking around and Gemba and how visibility can be used to best advantage in a library.

Findings

The paper finds that, in a tough economy especially, staff need supervisors to be visible and support changes that might have occurred, and patrons need to know that administrators are paying attention to how resources are used. A purposeful and meaningful effort by managers to be more visible and accessible can result in greater understanding of details, a better sense of loyalty, and higher levels of morale and patron satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information on the importance of visibility within the library working environment.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 16000