Search results

1 – 10 of over 17000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Rocco R. Vanasco

Examines the role of professional associations, governmental agencies, and international accounting and auditing bodies in promulgating standards to foster auditor…

Abstract

Examines the role of professional associations, governmental agencies, and international accounting and auditing bodies in promulgating standards to foster auditor independence domestically and abroad. Focuses specifically on the role played by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA), the Securities and Exchange Commission and the US Government Accounting Office. Also looks at other professional associations in banking, industry, and manufacturing sectors dealing with sensitive issues of auditors′ involvement in such matters as management advisory services, operating responsibilities, outsourcing, opinion shopping, auditor rotation, and other conflicts of interest which may impair auditor independence.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 11 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

E.G. Wood

The subject of small firms has aroused increasing interest in recent years, particularly since the Report of the Bolton Committee of Inquiry on Small Firms, published in…

Abstract

The subject of small firms has aroused increasing interest in recent years, particularly since the Report of the Bolton Committee of Inquiry on Small Firms, published in November 1971. On one topic, namely, management advisory services for small firms, there are conflicting opinions about the need for such services, the type of service, the methods of operating and staffing and the financial implications.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Michael Sanderson and James Taggart

Previous research has highlighted the trend that ACAS advice has long been held in high esteem by both employers and employees alike. A study of small to medium sized…

Abstract

Previous research has highlighted the trend that ACAS advice has long been held in high esteem by both employers and employees alike. A study of small to medium sized manufacturing establishments in Renfrewshire, Scotland, suggests that employers prefer partial advice as opposed to impartial advice. Instead they may turn to alternative bodies other than ACAS which have the ability to offer employee relations “support”, which is beyond the remit of ACAS. In light of limited resources due to funding constraints, the implications for the provision of ACAS advice are examined in relation to alternative bodies offering employee relations help.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Leighton Jay and Michael Schaper

Despite the growth of many new business advice and support services over the last 15 years, the extent to which such facilities are used by the Australian small business…

Abstract

Despite the growth of many new business advice and support services over the last 15 years, the extent to which such facilities are used by the Australian small business sector has not been extensively examined, especially amongst the micro‐enterprises that comprise the majority of all small firms. Home based businesses (HBBs) constitute the largest group of micro‐businesses in Australia, as well as comprising the biggest single SME sector in the nation. An investigation into the usage of advisory services by HBBs in Perth, Western Australia revealed substantial differences in the types and frequency of advisers used. It was found that accountants, banks, other business operators and family/friends were the most commonly consulted services. In contrast, lawyers, government agencies, industry associations, and management consultants were only infrequently used. The research project also attempted to determine if the frequency of adviser usage could be predicted on the basis of a range of individual and firm characteristics (namely, the age of the business, the size of the enterprise, and the age and gender of the owner/operator). A positive correlation was found to exist with all four factors, with micro‐firms managed by men tending to use advisory services more frequently.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Peter Carey and George Tanewski

Business advisory services are an emerging service category for external accountants in the small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) environment. The purpose of this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Business advisory services are an emerging service category for external accountants in the small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) environment. The purpose of this study is to investigate determinants of SME demand for business advice, drawing on the agency theory, relational marketing and resource-based literatures.

Design/methodology/approach

The study empirically tested theoretical predictions based on an Australia-wide survey of SMEs, in which 485 firms responded to a questionnaire.

Findings

The results show that the purchase of business advice is significantly and positively associated with the perceived competence of the external accountant, but significantly and negatively associated with length of the relationship. However, the authors observe a significant positive interaction between tenure of the relationship and competence. A unique contribution of this study is the development of the understanding of the combined role of the external accountant’s competence and the tenure of the relationship. The findings indicate that SMEs require time to verify whether accountants have the competence to provide business advice, suggesting that information asymmetry and uncertainty is minimised only after SMEs have nurtured relationships with their external accountants, and after they have developed some confidence in the competence of their external accountants. At the same time, the negative association with tenure suggests that when accountants are not perceived as competent advisors, SMEs purchase less advice over time.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has important theoretical implications by augmenting agency theory, the relational marketing and the resource-based literature, and it clarifies which antecedent factors are important in explaining demand for business advisory services provided by accountants to their SME clients. In particular, the paper highlights the importance of the combined roles that the external accountant’s competence and tenure play in the SME–accountant relationship, highlighting how these two factors can overcome credence issues and ex ante information problems.

Practical implications

The findings have practical implications for government initiatives targeting support to SMEs, as the findings identify small firms and firms planning to grow as likely to gain the greatest benefit from external advice and support.

Originality/value

This study adds to the limited literature and scant theoretical discussions on the emergence of business advisory services that accountants provide to their SME clients by drawing on several theories to explain the determinants of business advice.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Staffan Furusten

The purpose of this paper is to explore and construct a model for the mechanisms for authorization of actors in contemporary society performing in the role of the expert.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and construct a model for the mechanisms for authorization of actors in contemporary society performing in the role of the expert.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used qualitative analyses of about 70 interviews with management consultants in small/middle‐sized nationally based (in Sweden) consultancies, and with buyers in public organizations of their services. The data are, however, expected to represent more general tendencies of the mechanisms for authorization of experts such as management consultants. The interviews were seen as narratives from the field and interpreted qualitatively in order to search for patterns and categories.

Findings

Systems for professionalism in practice among experts such as management consultants do not follow the routes suggested by traditional theories of professions. It is another system for professionalism where success in commercialisation means authorization in the role of the expert on the market. The mechanism for authorization is trust and the way to construct this is that the single expert and the organizations he or she represents emphasize versatility, availability, relevance and differentiation in their practice as experts.

Research limitations/implications

There is a growth in numbers, competence areas and importance of these forms of expert work in contemporary society. Understanding this is necessary and this study offers a model that explains this.

Practical implications

Markets for vague forms of experts, such as management consultants, are emerging. These are challenges faced by many individuals and organizations today.

Social implications

More individuals work under consulting conditions, more organizations tend to hire more external experts of various kinds on temporary bases instead of employing them, and the number of expert organizations is emerging and their size is increasing.

Originality/value

Little attention has been devoted to explanations of how authorization in practice is constructed and achieved among the new experts. This study offers a model for how this can be understood.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Pamela Kent

The purpose of this paper, using transaction cost economics as a theoretical framework, is to seek an understanding of a company's decision to purchase Management Advisory

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, using transaction cost economics as a theoretical framework, is to seek an understanding of a company's decision to purchase Management Advisory Services (MAS) from their external auditors and other consultants as opposed to assembling MAS internally within the company.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from annual reports for a pooled sample of 3,154 company years were collected for listed Australian companies to determine MAS from auditors. Data for a second sample were collected by undertaking a survey of listed companies to provide a figure for total management advisory services paid to auditors and other consultants. Ordinary least squares regression was used to analyse the data and predict companies' decision to outsource or internally generate MAS.

Findings

It is found that purchases of MAS from external auditors and other consultants are associated with, restructuring, number of controlled entities (subsidiaries), number of geographical segments, management change and frequency of contracting. Other company characteristics, including company's industry membership, short‐term growth, leverage, return on assets, use of a “big 5” auditor, type of audit report, and audit fees also explain the quantity of MAS purchased by a company from their external auditors and other consultants.

Originality/value

Transaction cost economics has not previously been applied to explain the decision to generate MAS internally by assembling knowledge within the company versus outsourcing from auditors and other consultants. The study makes use of unique data sets because it covers the period when regulations were not foreshowed restricting accounting firms supplying their audit clients with MAS.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

David B. Citron

This paper examines how the UK Chartered Accountants Joint Ethics Committee’s (CAJEC) 1996 Statement Integrity, Objectivity and Independence, which was developed at a time…

Abstract

This paper examines how the UK Chartered Accountants Joint Ethics Committee’s (CAJEC) 1996 Statement Integrity, Objectivity and Independence, which was developed at a time of mounting levels of criticism of the auditing profession, provides legitimization for the accounting profession’s increased commercial activities, particularly in the area of other business services. Parallel with a major shift in the nature of the activities of the professional firm, this ethics Statement gives expression to changes in the profession’s concept of independence. It adopts a more accommodating method for evaluating the adequacy of an auditor’s independence, introducing a “framework” approach in contrast with its predecessor’s “rule book” approach. Both the Statement and respondents to the preceding Consultation Papers support the flexible system afforded by the framework in terms of promoting clients’ economic interests. Moreover CAJEC’s proposals did not include any initiatives to promote audit firm transparency which might have enabled external monitoring of compliance with the framework. Thus, while the Statement does place some limitations on the flexibility of the framework and retains the distinction between audit and other activities, it ultimately embodies a notion of independence that is at one with the interests of the profession.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

L.J. Mullins

It is imperative that management make the most effective use of their resources as the environment in which organisations operate becomes increasingly competitive and…

Abstract

It is imperative that management make the most effective use of their resources as the environment in which organisations operate becomes increasingly competitive and complex. There are many tools to help the manager striving for organisational effectiveness, but difficulties can arise in defining these techniques.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 83 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

Keith Haaroff

The author takes one example of product development, the introduction by Midland Bank in 1982 of its International Cash Management Service, in order to highlight the way…

Abstract

The author takes one example of product development, the introduction by Midland Bank in 1982 of its International Cash Management Service, in order to highlight the way that a new product may in practice be brought to the market.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 17000