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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Ibrahim M. Shaluf, Fakharul‐razi Ahmadun, Aini Mat Said, Sa’ari Mustapha and Rashid Sharif

Major hazard organizations are dealing with hazardous material exceeding the threshold quantity. Major hazard organizations are relatively secure areas and cannot fail…

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2166

Abstract

Major hazard organizations are dealing with hazardous material exceeding the threshold quantity. Major hazard organizations are relatively secure areas and cannot fail from single error. However, failure of an organization to control hazardous material usually results in a technological man‐made disaster. The conditions preceding the onset of technological man‐made disaster are collectively called the technological man‐made disaster precondition phase “incubation period”. A model has been developed representing the technological man‐made disaster pre‐condition phase where it focuses on the origin of the technological man‐made disaster. The model was based on detailed analysis of four technological man‐made disasters at major hazard installations in Malaysia.

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Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Ibrahim Mohamed Shaluf and Fakhru'l‐Razi Ahmadun

To provide graduate students, researchers, and responsible personnel with an overview on the disaster types worldwide in general and disaster types in Malaysia.

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9272

Abstract

Purpose

To provide graduate students, researchers, and responsible personnel with an overview on the disaster types worldwide in general and disaster types in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The types of disasters by region for the period 1988‐1997 were obtained from recent published sources. The disasters which occurred in Malaysia have been collected from several sources such as the technical, general articles, internet web sites, and internal reports. The disasters which occurred during the period of 1968‐2004 have been reviewed. The disasters have been classified into natural disasters, man‐made disasters, and subsequent disasters. The man‐made disasters have been classified into technological disasters, transportation accidents, public places failure, and production failure.

Findings

Disasters have been classified into natural, man‐made disasters. The regions worldwide have experienced all kinds of natural disasters in last decade. It was pointed out that the occurrence of disasters from almost all kinds of hazards is among the highest in Asia and the Pacific. Malaysia experienced natural, man‐made and subsequent disasters. Malaysia has experienced 39 disasters during the period of 1968‐2004. The natural disasters were 49 percent of total disasters. Most of the natural disasters were resulted from the heavy rains. Malaysia has experienced 18 man‐made disasters. The man‐made disasters resulted in 282 fatalities, and 1,892 injuries.

Originality/value

This paper presents an overview on the disaster types by region worldwide. The paper also presents an overview on the disaster types in Malaysia. This paper combined the scattered disasters into one record. Therefore, there is a need for an authorized body to be responsible for the collecting, arranging, classifying, and storing of all type of the accidents in Malaysia. This experience can be benefited from/at any country.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Ibrahim Mohamed Shaluf

This paper seeks to provide graduate students, researchers, and government and independent agencies with an overview of disasters.

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5994

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide graduate students, researchers, and government and independent agencies with an overview of disasters.

Design/methodology/approach

Disasters have been the subject of research and a source of concern to academicians and government and independent agencies. In this paper disaster types are collected from several sources such as technical, general articles, internet web sites, and internal reports. Disaster types, definitions, hazards and mitigations are reviewed. Disasters are classified into natural disasters, man‐made disasters, and hybrid disasters. Man‐made disasters are classified into technological disasters, transportation accidents, public places failure, and production failure. Natural and/or man‐made disasters sometimes lead to subsequent disasters.

Findings

Disasters are classified into three types: natural, man‐made, and hybrid disasters. It is believed that the three disaster types cover all disastrous events. Disasters have different characteristics and impacts; however, disasters have a common element, which is their severity. Natural disasters are those disasters that result from natural forces. Man‐made disasters are those disasters that result from human decisions. Hybrid disasters are those disasters that result from both natural and man‐made causes. Subsequent disasters are those disasters that result from natural and/or man‐made disasters. Epidemics could be a disaster or a subsequent disaster.

Originality/value

This paper presents the types, definition, hazards, and mitigation of disasters. Disasters are arranged into disaster types, sub‐disasters, and disastrous events in the form of a disaster tree. An algorithm can be written utilizing this disaster tree. The algorithm can be used for training purposes to prevent or reduce disasters.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Ibrahim Mohamed Shaluf

This paper aims to provide graduate students, researchers, and government and independent agencies with an overview of disaster types.

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9749

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide graduate students, researchers, and government and independent agencies with an overview of disaster types.

Design/methodology/approach

Disaster types have been the subject of research by and concern to academicians and to government and independent agencies. The paper summarizes the views of researchers and agencies. Disaster types are collected from several sources such as technical, general articles, internet web sites, and internal reports. Disaster definitions, criteria and types are reviewed. Disasters are classified into natural disasters, man‐made disasters, and hybrid disasters. Man‐made disasters are classified into technological disasters, transportation accidents, public places failure, and production failure. The paper presents a comparison between the main types of disasters.

Findings

Disasters are classified into three types: naturals, man‐mades, and hybrid disasters. It is believed that the three disaster types cover all disastrous events. No definition of disaster is universally accepted. Several criteria are proposed to define disasters. Understanding of disaster definitions, criteria, and types aids researchers and agencies in the proper classification, good recording, and better analysis of disasters. Disasters have different characteristics and impact; however, disasters have a common element, which is their severity.

Originality/value

This paper presents a definition of and criteria for disasters. The paper also presents an overview of disaster types. The paper presents a comparison between the main types of disasters, and combines various disaster terms into one record.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

J. Michael Tarn, H. Joseph Wen and Stephen C. Shih

The purpose of this paper is to study major man‐made system disasters and to suggest a solution for filling the noted gaps in control systems interfaces and to render…

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1909

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study major man‐made system disasters and to suggest a solution for filling the noted gaps in control systems interfaces and to render those vital considerations for the next‐generation disaster management control systems.

Design/methodology/approach

This research analyzes the nature of large‐scale disasters and observes that most man‐made system disasters are composed of many related events that interact with one another.

Findings

The findings show evidence of a common path to catastrophe. These functional failures resulted from the information gaps that eventually contribute to the development of a tragedy. Because of the intricate interconnections among related events of a developed calamity, an integrated approach to man‐made disaster detection and prevention as well as emergency management is required.

Practical implications

Conducting an analysis of the typical contingency control structures, the authors suggest that disaster or emergency managers adopt a pessimistic and quasi‐intelligent orientation to monitor and control critical systems.

Originality/value

This research presents a generic threat‐driven disaster management control system design with advanced model bases and decision support technologies to enhance conventional disaster management control systems and to supplement management responses so that the sphere and magnitude of damage can be minimized.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Gyöngyi Kovács and Karen Spens

The purpose of this paper is to identify the challenges of humanitarian logisticians with respect to different types of disasters, phases of disaster relief and the type…

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18423

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the challenges of humanitarian logisticians with respect to different types of disasters, phases of disaster relief and the type of humanitarian organization. A conceptual model is constructed that serves as a basis to identify these challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a country as a case, namely Ghana. Structured and unstructured data are collected in a workshop with humanitarian logisticians, and complemented with presentations of humanitarian logisticians, as they perceive their challenges. Disaster statistics and country profiles are used as secondary data.

Findings

The paper shows that some disasters defy a categorization between natural and man‐made causes. Challenges of humanitarian logisticians depend not only on the disaster at hand, but also on the local presence of their organization. The most emphasized challenge is the coordination of logistical activities. Challenges can be managed better if attributing them to different stakeholder environments.

Research limitations/implications

Applying stakeholder theory to logistics, this paper provides a greater understanding for the challenges of humanitarian logisticians.

Practical implications

A stakeholder categorization of the challenges of humanitarian logisticians helps to find potential collaboration partners as well as to mitigate these challenges.

Originality/value

Humanitarian logistics is a rather new field in logistics literature. What is more, there is a lack of empirical cases in the field. This paper proposes a conceptual model based on an actual empirical case.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Nathan Kunz and Gerald Reiner

The purpose of this paper is to give an up‐to‐date and structured insight into the most recent literature on humanitarian logistics, and suggest trends for future research…

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4207

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give an up‐to‐date and structured insight into the most recent literature on humanitarian logistics, and suggest trends for future research based on the gaps identified through structured content analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a quantitative and qualitative content analysis process to analyse the characteristics of the existing literature, identifying the most studied topics in six structural dimensions, and presenting gaps and recommendations for further research.

Findings

It was found that existing humanitarian logistics research shows too little interest in continuous humanitarian aid operations, in slow onset disasters and man‐made catastrophes. While several papers address different phases of disasters, very few focus particularly on the reconstruction following a disaster. Empirical research is underrepresented in the existing literature as well.

Research limitations/implications

While five of the authors’ structural dimensions are inspired by previous reviews, the sixth dimension (situational factors) is derived from a theoretical framework which the authors developed and which has never been tested before. The validity of the study could therefore be increased by testing this framework.

Originality/value

The authors analyse the broadest set of papers (174) ever covered in previous literature reviews on humanitarian logistics. A quantitative analysis of the papers was conducted in order to analyse the situational factors which have mostly been studied so far in literature. This paper is also the first in humanitarian logistics to use content analysis as the main methodology to analyse literature in a structured way, which is of particular value to the academic community as well as practitioners.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Ibrahim M. Shaluf, Fakharul‐razi Ahmadun and Sa’ari Mustapha

Disasters are classified as natural and man‐made disasters. Man‐made disaster, which occurs at the major hazard installation, is a technological disaster. For an incident…

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2903

Abstract

Disasters are classified as natural and man‐made disasters. Man‐made disaster, which occurs at the major hazard installation, is a technological disaster. For an incident to be classified as technological disaster criteria are required to be met. Several criteria have been proposed by researchers and agencies defining the disasters in terms of casualties, economic loss and environmental impact. Few models have been drawn describing the sequence of development of the technological disaster. This paper reviews in detail the proposed criteria, which define the disaster. The paper also summarizes the models which describe the disaster stages. Finally the paper summarizes a proposed model of the technological disaster precondition phase for major accidents.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2012

Sean P. Varano and Joseph A. Schafer

Purpose – This chapter provides an overview to the challenges of policing both natural and man-made disasters. Questions surrounding police preparedness to respond to…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter provides an overview to the challenges of policing both natural and man-made disasters. Questions surrounding police preparedness to respond to large-scale disasters as well as the causes of failure are likely one of the single biggest system threats faced by police today.

Design/methodology/approach – The chapter starts out with a short discussion about the important impact the 9/11 attacks as well as both Hurricanes Katrina and Rita had on policing in the United States. The materials presented also provide a conceptual framework for understanding the meaning of “disasters,” as well as making sense of the effectiveness of the police response. Finally, this chapter provides an overview of the role of police in disasters, and more importantly, their role in “creating order out of chaos” (Punch & Markham, 2000).

Findings – After more than 10 years of substantial attention to problems associated with responses to natural and man-made disasters, significant barriers remain in the level of communication and coordination among first responders. These barriers are best understood as cultural and not technical in nature.

Originality/value of paper – The conceptual role of police in both pre-disaster planning and post-disaster responses has been largely ignored in the literature. This chapter provides a strong framework for conceptualizing these roles. We argue that police, as core members of the first responder system, must continue to break down cultural barriers that diminish their capacities to effectively serve communities in the wake of disasters.

Details

Disasters, Hazards and Law
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-914-1

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Laila Hussein Moustafa

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a survey sent to librarians and archivists in national and academic libraries in the Middle East and North Africa…

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2372

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a survey sent to librarians and archivists in national and academic libraries in the Middle East and North Africa and the results of eight in-person interviews about the status and content of wartime disaster management plans in their institutions. Based on the research and analysis it presents, the paper concludes that the majority of the region’s libraries and archives either lack or have insufficient plans in place and stresses the need to establish and implement protocols for the protection and preservation of their priceless holdings. In addition to analysis the paper offers some recommendations for overcoming the impact of future disasters on the holdings of these libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on survey and interviews that was done with librarians, archives, managers from the Middle East.

Findings

The paper presented the result of trying to find if libraries, and archives has disaster planning or no. Most of the libraries do not have a disaster plan and maybe do not even know what it means.

Research limitations/implications

The research is covering some of the libraries in the Middle East and it was meant to be send to every library and archive but at least to the national libraries of each country in the Middle East.

Social implications

Disaster planning is very needed to protect any people culture heritage and not having one in spite all the wars and damaged of libraries is something the author’s research addressed.

Originality/value

No one has written about this topic, and the author’s first paper was the scan of literature review of all what was written about disaster planning in a time of war. As a result of not finding anyone who wrote about that topic, the author decided to conduct the survey and the interview to find out if there is a plan or no. The author’s work is original and very important to help in preserving the world heritage in the Middle East.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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