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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Sonika Pandey, Amrita Poonia and Suman Rai

To overcome the need of seasonal fruit ber, consumers prefer to use fruits in such a form that can be prepared easily or consumed instantly. By transforming them into…

Abstract

Purpose

To overcome the need of seasonal fruit ber, consumers prefer to use fruits in such a form that can be prepared easily or consumed instantly. By transforming them into powders, they can be effortlessly attained as well as preserved, stored and processed.

Design/methodology/approach

To optimize the spray drying conditions for development of ber fruit powder, response surface methodology was used. The experimental design consisted of 13 runs. The levels of independent variables, i.e. inlet air temperature, varied from 153.79ºC to 196.21ºC and maltodextrin concentration, from 4.17 to 9.83 per cent. The responses were moisture content, bulk density, solubility, vitamin C, ΔE and L value.

Findings

The second-order polynomial model fitted for moisture content, bulk density, solubility, vitamin C, ΔE and L value was highly significant (p < 0.001) for each response. The inlet air temperature showed maximum influence on moisture content, bulk density, solubility and vitamin C, whereas the maltodextrin concentration showed maximum influence on bulk density, solubility, ΔE and L value. The predicted values were attained as moisture 4.90 per cent, bulk density 0.35g/ml, solubility 89.11 per cent, vitamin C 91.06mg/100g, ΔE 31.03 and L 87.78. The recommended optimum spray drying conditions were inlet air temperature and maltodextrin concentration of 166.64°C and 9.26 per cent, respectively.

Originality/value

Spray drying of the underused Indian fruit ber has enhanced its utility. Ber powder can further be used as an instant beverage, in sweets, as a flavoring agent and in soft drinks.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2022

Quoc-Duy Nguyen, Thi-Dung Vu, Thuy-Trang Nguyen, Thi-Kieu-Vi Phan, Hieu-Thao Pham and Phuong-Thao Nguyen

This study aims to investigate the effect of spray drying temperature and maltodextrin addition on the contents of phenolics, flavonoids, anthocyanins and antioxidant…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effect of spray drying temperature and maltodextrin addition on the contents of phenolics, flavonoids, anthocyanins and antioxidant activities (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl [DPPH] radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power and reducing power) of karonda powder.

Design/methodology/approach

Over the past few decades, the demands for application of natural colorants in food production have been attracting the attention of academic research and food industry. Anthocyanins, a red pigment commonly found on plants, show high potentials in the preparation of spray-dried pigment powder. This study, therefore, was conducted using full factorial design with two factors, namely, inlet temperature (150°C and 160°C) and soluble solid concentration (10, 15 and 20°Brix) with maltodextrin as carrier to produce pigment powder from karonda, an anthocyanin-rich fruit which is native to southeast Asia.

Findings

Increasing soluble solid content from 10 to 15°Brix resulted in a 42%–57% reduction in phenolic, flavonoid and anthocyanin contents. However, when increasing the amount of maltodextrin from 15 to 20°Brix, a lower reduction (approximately 11%–19%) was observed. In samples with the same °Brix, there was no significant variation in antioxidant contents and activities, especially at high maltodextrin ratios. In addition, the reducing power of samples dried at higher temperature (160°C) was higher than that of samples dried at lower temperature. Karonda spray-dried powder showed a good positive correlation (p < 0.01) between antioxidant contents and DPPH• activity.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, in this study, for the first time, the effect of spray drying conditions on the quality of karonda powder was investigated.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 June 2022

Gousia Gani, Haroon Naik, Tawheed Amin, Nusrat Jan, Syed Zameer Hussain, Omar Bashir and Abida Jabeen

Currently, there is a great demand for those food products that are easy to prepare or ready for direct consumption. Making pear fruit/juice available round the year is…

Abstract

Purpose

Currently, there is a great demand for those food products that are easy to prepare or ready for direct consumption. Making pear fruit/juice available round the year is desirous owing to pears' high-nutritional value and specific pleasant taste. Pear is, however, a seasonal fruit and under ambient conditions has a limited shelf life rendering it available as fresh fruit for a specific period.

Design/methodology/approach

The study aimed to optimize the spray drying process parameters using response surface methodology for the development of pear juice powder. The process variables included the inlet air temperature of 140–210°C, maltodextrin levels of 4–25%, atomization speed of 11,400–28,000 rpm, feed flow rate of 180–630 mL/hr, and feed total soluble solids (TSS) of 13–30°Brix. The dependent responses were powder yield, solubility, antioxidant activity {% 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity}, dispersibility, hygroscopicity and particle density.

Findings

Among independent variables, inlet air temperature showed a predominant effect. The optimum processing conditions for the development of pear juice powder with optimum quality were 163.02°C inlet air temperature, 13.50% maltodextrin, 28,000 rpm atomization speed, 390.94 mL/h feed flow rate, and 25.5°Brix feed TSS. Under these optimum conditions, pear powder with desirable properties could be produced. The experimental and predicted values were found to be in agreement, indicating the suitability of the model in predicting optimizing responses of pear powder. Glass transition temperature of pear powder was found to be 36.60 ± 0.40°C, which is much higher than that of ambient temperature, suggesting better shelf stability.

Originality/value

The processing of pear fruit has resulted in the increased demand for pear juice powder in both domestic and international markets as a primer of new food products. The optimum conditions obtained in the current study could provide a new insight to the food industry in developing spray-dried pear powder of optimum quality. This can open up a new horizon in the field of food industry for the common masses of Jammu and Kashmir, India.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Anshu Sharma, Anju Kumari Dhiman and Surekha Attri

This study aims to encapsulate the crude carotene pigment isolated from waste portion of Cucurbita maxima with the help of different encapsulating agents through…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to encapsulate the crude carotene pigment isolated from waste portion of Cucurbita maxima with the help of different encapsulating agents through lyophilization to transform crude pigment into stable form for further utilization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper opted for encapsulation of extracted carotene pigment by lyophilization using various carrier materials such as maltodextrin 20 dextrose equivalent (DE), maltodextrin 10 DE and tapioca starch along with emulsifier polysorbate-80. After encapsulation of crude carotene pigment, prepared encapsulated powder was subjected to chemical analysis. The data was analysed statistically by a complete randomized design.

Findings

Maximum encapsulation efficiency, carotene content, antioxidant activity and water solubility index were achieved when 0.06% of crude carotene pigment was emulsified with same quantity of polysorbate-80, followed by encapsulation with 20% of maltodextrin 20 DE during lyophilization.

Originality/value

Even though few researchers have worked on the encapsulation of colour pigments, no researcher has reported encapsulation of carotene pigment extracted from waste of C. maxima.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

İsmail Mücahit Alptekin, Ece Erdoğan, Aylin İşler, Esma Cansu Yanalak, Funda Pınar Çakiroğlu and Sevgi Aras

Previous studies have reported that dietary fibers such as polydextrose and maltodextrin can reduce food intake; however, the studies on the differences of this effect are…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies have reported that dietary fibers such as polydextrose and maltodextrin can reduce food intake; however, the studies on the differences of this effect are insufficient. The purpose of this paper is to compare the effects of dietary fibers maltodextrin and polydextrose on alterations of short-term satiety, energy intake and postprandial blood glucose in healthy females.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was designed as a randomized, crossover and double blind research. For this purpose, 21 healthy females consumed a milkshake containing 0 g (control), 15 g polydextrose (PDX) and 15 g maltodextrin (MDX), and an ad libitum lunch meal was served 150 min later. Subjective appetite scores (hunger, satiety, prospective food consumption and desire to eat) were measured using a visual analog scale. Appetite scores and blood glucose were measured before preload and once per 15 min after milkshake consumption.

Findings

Visual analog scale scores showed that PDX had an improved effect on satiety and hunger feelings. Compared to the control, dietary fiber increased the Area Under Curve (AUC) scores of satiety (p < 0.001) and decreased the AUC scores of hunger (p < 0.001), prospective food consumption (p < 0.001) and desire to eat (p < 0.001). Energy intake during ad libitum meal was significantly lower in PDX (Control: 862 (54.3) Kcal versus PDX: 679 (35.4) Kcal and MDX: 780 (49.3) Kcal. Moreover, the blood glucose levels were significantly lower in MDX.

Originality/value

This study conducted with healthy females demonstrated that PDX was more effective in inducing satiety during subsequent food intake, and that postprandial blood glucose were within more healthy levels in MDX.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Ting‐Jin Lim, Azhar‐Mat Easa, Abdul‐Alias Karim, Rajeev Bhat and Min‐Tze Liong

The aim of this study is to develop a soy‐based cream cheese (SCC) with textural characteristics comparable to that of commercial dairy cream cheese (DCC) via the addition…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to develop a soy‐based cream cheese (SCC) with textural characteristics comparable to that of commercial dairy cream cheese (DCC) via the addition of microbial transglutaminase (MTG), soy protein isolate (SPI) and maltodextrin (MD).

Design/methodology/approach

Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed in this study to determine the effects of MTG, MD and SPI on firmness of SCC.

Findings

The second‐order model generated via RSM was significant with only a 9.76 per cent variation not explained by the model. The coefficient of regression revealed that MTG, MD and SPI showed significant linear effects (P<0.0001) on the firmness of SCC, while MTG and SPI showed significant quadratic effects. The model successfully predicted and developed a SCC model with similar firmness as that of DCC; via the combination of 2.57 per cent (w/w) of MTG, 19.69 per cent (w/w) of SPI and 19.69 per cent (w/w) of MD. Physicochemical analyses revealed that SCC possessed lower fat content, reduced saturated fatty acid and zero trans fat. Further rheological measurements revealed that SCC was more solid‐like at room temperature, but less elastic at refrigerated temperature compared to DCC. SEM and SDS‐PAGE analyses affirmed that the textural changes of SCC were attributed to MTG‐induced cross‐linking.

Originality/value

The research demonstrated that a non‐dairy cream cheese could be developed using soy. In addition, the SCC also contained better nutritional properties compared to its dairy counterpart.

Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

J. Suwanprateeb and W. Suwanpreuk

The aim is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the transparency of the samples or models which were fabricated by three dimensional printing technology and study…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the transparency of the samples or models which were fabricated by three dimensional printing technology and study the properties of such developed system.

Design/methodology/approach

Polymethyl methacrylate powders were mixed with maltodextrin binders and used as raw materials for 3DP machine to fabricate samples. The samples were then divided into two groups either infiltrating with heat‐cured acrylate infiltrant or subjected to binder elimination prior to infiltration. As‐fabricated and two types of infiltrated samples were characterized to compare the influence of post‐processing on properties such as shrinkage, light transmittance and flexural properties including modulus, strength and strain at break.

Findings

It was observed that the combination of binder elimination and resin infiltration showed the greatest increase in flexural properties and transmittance percentage approaching the values of polymethyl methacrylate sheet and stereolithography samples. Infiltration without binder elimination increased the transmittance of samples slightly in comparison to as‐fabricated samples. This is related to the level of porosity in the samples and the difference in refractive index of different compositions within the samples namely PMMA, binder and infiltrant.

Research limitations/implications

Additional step of binder elimination prior to infiltration is needed and this may take time to complete.

Practical implications

The technique presented can be used to fabricate a translucent and strong 3DP models.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the factors that are needed to consider increasing the transparency and even strength of 3DP models.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Maricruz Henkel Carrillo, Geuntak Lee, Charles Maniere and Eugene A. Olevsky

The purpose of this work is to introduce a novel approach of using additive manufacturing (AM) to produce dense complex ceramic and metallic parts. Powder 3D printing has…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this work is to introduce a novel approach of using additive manufacturing (AM) to produce dense complex ceramic and metallic parts. Powder 3D printing has been gaining popularity due to its ease of use and versatility. However, powder-based methods such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Sintering (SLS), utilizes high power lasers which generate thermal shock conditions in metals and are not ideal for ceramics due to their high melting temperature. Indirect additive manufacturing methods have been explored to address the above issues but have proven to be wasteful and time-consuming.

Design/methodology/approach

In this work, a novel approach of producing high density net-shaped prototypes using subtractive sintering (SS) and solvent jetting is developed. AM combined with SS (AM-SS) is a process that includes five simple steps. AM-SS can produce repeatable and reliable results as has been shown in this work.

Findings

As a proof-of-concept, a zirconia dental crown with a high density of 97% is fabricated using this approach. Microstructure and properties of the fabricated components are analyzed.

Originality/value

A major advantage of this method is the ability to efficiently fabricate high density parts using either metal powder and more importantly, ceramic powder which is traditionally difficult to densify using AM. Additionally, any powder particle size (including nano) and shape can be used which is not the case for traditional powder-based 3D printing.

Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Twinkle Borah, Nooreen Washmin, Nayan Jyoti Bora, Jadumoni Saikia, Padma Sangmu Bomzon, Tobiul Hussain Ahmed, Prasenjit Manna, Siddhartha Proteem Saikia and Dipanwita Banik

The study was aimed to compare the effect of three drying techniques viz., spray, freeze and hot air oven (HAO) drying on yield, nutritional parameters, minerals and…

Abstract

Purpose

The study was aimed to compare the effect of three drying techniques viz., spray, freeze and hot air oven (HAO) drying on yield, nutritional parameters, minerals and physicochemical and morphological characterization of wild banana pulp (Musa balbisiana Colla).

Design/methodology/approach

Contents of carbohydrate was estimated by Anthrone reagent, protein by Kjeldahl, fat by Soxhlet, dietary fiber and ash by Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC), minerals by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry, gross calorific value by Bomb calorimeter, moisture by moisture analyzer, water activity by water activity meter, morphological characterization by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), statistical level of significance at p < 0.05 by ANOVA, predictive modeling by simple and multiple linear regression.

Findings

Freeze and HAO drying were standardized with matured (stage 2) and spray drying with ripe bananas (stage 6). Freeze drying showed highest yield (76.69 ± 0.15%), minerals viz., K (1175.67 ± 1.41), Fe (2.27 ± 0.09), Mg (120.33 ± 0.47), Mn (4.40 ± 0.28) mg/100 g, protein (7.53 ± 0.14%), lesser moisture (7.95 ± 0.01%), water activity (0.17 ± 0.02aw), hygroscopicity (6.37 ± 1.09%), well dispersed particles by SEM. HAO drying exhibited highest dietary fiber (18.95 ± 0.24%), gross calorific value 357.17 kcal/100 gm, higher solubility (47.22 ± 0.86%). Spray drying showed highest carbohydrate (85.29 ± 0.01%), lowest yield (28.26 ± 0.32%), required 30.5% adjuncts.

Research limitations/implications

Effect of three drying techniques and use of adjuncts were not uniform for ripe and matured bananas.

Practical implications

Commercial utilization of seeded wild banana.

Social implications

Value addition of wild banana in Assam, India

Originality/value

Freeze drying of mature wild banana pulp (M. balbisiana) was found as best technique utilizing lesser energy.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2022

Deepti Kaushal and Gurpreet Kalsi

Gut health has multidimensional impact on childhood growth and development. Diet being the major modulator of gut health, this study aims to hypothesize if supplementation…

Abstract

Purpose

Gut health has multidimensional impact on childhood growth and development. Diet being the major modulator of gut health, this study aims to hypothesize if supplementation of dietary prebiotics and vitamins can impact gut environment of healthy children.

Design/methodology/approach

A double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted with parallel allocation of children 8–13 years of age to placebo or test group. Test group was supplemented with 1.5 g of formulation comprising prebiotics and vitamins, and to placebo, maltodextrin (1.5 g) was supplemented. After four weeks, the effect on markers of gut health (i.e. beneficial microbes, and gut integrity markers such as secretory Immunoglobulin A [sIgA] and calprotectin concentration) was evaluated in feces of children.

Findings

Significant increase of 17.1% in fecal bifidobacteria counts (p = 0.04) was observed in the test group compared to placebo after four weeks. Also, fecal calprotectin concentration decreased (20%) significantly (p = 0.01) in test group compared to placebo. In addition, the test group showed significant improvement in fecal sIgA and lactobacilli compared to baseline concentration (p = 0.01 and 0.001, respectively).

Research limitations/implications

This study demonstrates that prebiotic (and vitamin) intervention may influence health outcomes in children by positively modulating markers of gut health.

Originality/value

There are limited studies demonstrating the efficacy of prebiotic and vitamins on gut health of school age children.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 52 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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