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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2017

Denise Fischer, René Mauer and Malte Brettel

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of regulatory focus in sustainable entrepreneurship processes to answer questions on how sustainable entrepreneurs pursue…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of regulatory focus in sustainable entrepreneurship processes to answer questions on how sustainable entrepreneurs pursue their goals and what motivates them. Knowledge about an entrepreneur’s motivational attribute is essential when trying to understand new venture creation processes. To determine an entrepreneur’s affiliation with one of the two self-regulatory systems, promotion focus and prevention focus, it is helpful to establish whether he or she is motivated by growth and development goals (promotion) or rather by responsibility and security goals (prevention).

Design/methodology/approach

In a qualitative study of seven sustainable ventures, two semi-structured interview rounds with 14 founders were conducted. Archival data from internal and external sources were gathered, resulting in more than 80 text documents.

Findings

Findings reveal that the self-regulatory focus of sustainable entrepreneurs changes during the entrepreneurial process with regard to the temporal dynamics of motivation. While conceiving ideas, sustainable entrepreneurs engage in a prevention-focused self-regulatory process because social or ecological problems induce them to direct their attention toward sustainable development goals. During rollout, in contrast, they increasingly engage in a promotion-focused self-regulatory process and concentrate more on venture growth goals.

Practical implications

The results highlight the important role of a regulatory fit between key self-regulatory entrepreneurial behaviors and entrepreneurs’ regulatory orientation toward increased motivation and enjoyment when pursuing goals.

Originality/value

This study’s contributions extend and combine the theories of regulatory focus, entrepreneurial motivation, and entrepreneurial processes in the field of sustainable entrepreneurship. They are valuable for understanding the determinants of sustainable entrepreneurial action.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2017

Daniela Werthes, René Mauer and Malte Brettel

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how entrepreneurs in the cultural and creative industries develop an entrepreneurial identity. It also aims to expand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how entrepreneurs in the cultural and creative industries develop an entrepreneurial identity. It also aims to expand research on cultural and creative entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on longitudinal qualitative cases and analyses the potential entrepreneurial identity development of eight cultural and creative entrepreneurs from Germany. The researchers create a framework to ascertain whether and, if so, how cultural and creative entrepreneurs develop an entrepreneurial identity.

Findings

The findings suggest that cultural and creative entrepreneurs do develop an entrepreneurial identity and incorporate their cultural and creative identity into that entrepreneurial identity whereas self-reflection is a key driver in the development.

Practical implications

Cultural and creative entrepreneurs are a key driver of economic development. Hence, it is important to generate a more detailed understanding of their entrepreneurial mind-set and their behaviour.

Originality/value

The study suggests that cultural and creative entrepreneurs actively develop an entrepreneurial identity and that self-reflection, communication with other entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial experience are the main drivers of their identity development. Nevertheless, their cultural and creative identity does have an influence on their entrepreneurial identity. In addition, the study demonstrates how such entrepreneurs develop their identity.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Malte Brettel, Andreas Engelen, Florian Heinemann and Andreas Kessell

Qualitative and recent quantitative research indicates that market orientation exerts a positive effect on the performance of new entrepreneurial firms. However, the…

Abstract

Qualitative and recent quantitative research indicates that market orientation exerts a positive effect on the performance of new entrepreneurial firms. However, the question whether in this context organizational culture, which has been identified as an important antecedent of market‐oriented behavior in established firms, also that shows a significant influence on the level of market orientation has so far been neglected. Using a sample of 143 new entrepreneurial firms, the present analysis shows empirically that market‐oriented behavior is in fact rooted in this type of culture. Thereby, organizational culture does exert an indirect influence on the performance of new entrepreneurial firms.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Sebastian Arendt and Malte Brettel

The aim of this paper is to examine the effects of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on corporate identity, image and firm performance in a multi‐industry setting, in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the effects of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on corporate identity, image and firm performance in a multi‐industry setting, in order to support evidence that the effects of CSR differ in different industry settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The study, based on pre‐existing CSR scales, was tested using data collected from a sample of 389 European companies. Hypotheses are based on the examination of the moderating effects of CSR using a group comparison method.

Findings

Contingency models show that CSR triggers the corporate‐image‐building process and that its relationship to company success varies significantly based on company size, industry and marketing budget.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted within a specific region in the EU and as such these findings may or may not be generalized to other regions like Asia or the USA. In addition, the secondary data of the study did not include stakeholders other than customers and suppliers, suggesting that further analysis of the model should be made using data from additional stakeholders.

Practical implications

Previous research has shown mixed results from companies' efforts in the field of CSR. This paper triggers practitioners' discussion about the ability to pursue CSR, depending on their size, industry, and marketing budget, and helps them to set the right focus for their CSR efforts.

Originality/value

The study enriches the body of empirical research on CSR and provides support for research investigating under which conditions CSR is most effective. It is the first to analyze samples from different industries in this context.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Marc Rodenbach and Malte Brettel

The aim of this paper is to corroborate with empirical validations the theoretical considerations about the influence of chief executive officers (CEOs) and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to corroborate with empirical validations the theoretical considerations about the influence of chief executive officers (CEOs) and their experience as micro‐level origin of dynamic capabilities in organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper empirically analyses the impact of CEO experience (CEO firm experience, CEO age, CEO international experience, CEO functional experience) as a micro‐level origin of dynamic marketing and research and development (R&D) capabilities.

Findings

The results show that CEO experience influences dynamic capabilities and corroborate the theoretical considerations about the influence of micro‐level origins, i.e. CEO firm experience and CEO age influence the development of dynamic capabilities, dependent on environmental conditions.

Research limitations/implications

The findings encourage more research on the important role of micro‐level origins of dynamic capabilities. With a view to the theoretical background, it would be useful to know whether CEO experience at the individual level and its impact on dynamic capabilities can be transferred to the organisational level.

Practical implications

CEO experience can significantly improve or downgrade dynamic marketing and R&D capabilities, e.g. organisations in turbulent environments have an advantage when their CEO is young, whereas organisations in less turbulent environments benefit from an older CEO.

Originality/value

The paper helps build a better understanding of the role of CEOs and their experience as a micro‐level origin of dynamic capabilities in organisations. It extends the suggestion that micro‐level origins are important in the development of dynamic capabilities.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2010

Malte Brettel and Andrea Spilker‐Attig

The internet has gained enormous importance as an advertising medium. At the same time, the question of marketing accountability has become one of the top areas of…

Abstract

Purpose

The internet has gained enormous importance as an advertising medium. At the same time, the question of marketing accountability has become one of the top areas of research for researchers and practitioners who aim at optimal marketing budget allocations. This paper aims to show that national culture has an impact on how consumer behavior is influenced by online advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper compares the effectiveness of internet advertising in the USA and France by analyzing a real data sample with more than 1.2 million transactions using partial least squares and structural equation modeling.

Findings

It is found that on‐demand channels have a stronger effect on short‐term success than push‐channels and that this effect is strongly moderated by the culture. It is recommended that spending and efforts in the various advertising channels be adjusted to reflect the product offered and the customers to whom it is offered, as customers in both countries should be targeted by advertising in different ways. The channel effectiveness of affiliate price comparison sites and search engines has significantly different impacts on customer behavior in the USA and France.

Originality/value

Until now, most companies have utilized a suboptimal allocation of resources to advertising channels because of missing and misleading data. Focusing on this problem, the paper suggests that advertisers apply the methodology to identify the total effect of clicks in each advertising channel. Combining these total effects with the associated costs allows practitioners to optimize their online advertising spending.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

David Lamond and Rocky Dwyer

Abstract

Details

Management Decision, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Malte Stefan Ackermann, Michael Stephan and John M. Penrose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to quantify the communication of organizational innovativeness (OI) on a large scale; and to examine the relationship of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to quantify the communication of organizational innovativeness (OI) on a large scale; and to examine the relationship of communicating OI and the corresponding investments in research and development (R & D) of multinational corporations (MNCs).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 3,043 annual reports from 326 MNCs are examined utilizing quantitative content analysis, which focusses on fixed selected terminologies, in the years 1998-2008.

Findings

Scholars assume that the capacity for OI is becoming the single most important task in organizational survival. Even though in the sample the investments in R & D are not increasing, even slightly declining, the communication of OI is increasing. Using mixed-effects regression analysis, the findings indicate that the corporations that are investing in R & D are also communicating these efforts correspondingly.

Practical implications

This is the first study that measures the communication of OI using quantitative content analysis.

Originality/value

The results indicate that not only do the communication efforts of an organization’s OI have a perceived increasing importance. They also suggest that OI itself has become more important for organizations from a strategic point of view.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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