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Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2016

Kayla Reed, Trent S. Parker, Mallory Lucier-Greer and Marsha L. Rehm

This study examined how parental divorce during emerging adulthood gives meaning to emerging adults’ developmental stage and interpersonal relationships.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined how parental divorce during emerging adulthood gives meaning to emerging adults’ developmental stage and interpersonal relationships.

Methodology/approach

The participant sample consisted of 15 females from the Southeastern United States who were between the ages of 18 and 25 (M = 21.5). Qualitative methods were utilized, with a transcendental phenomenological research methodology specifically applied. Interviews were conducted focusing on perceptions of the divorce experience in relation to important aspects of emerging adulthood, namely developmental experiences and interpersonal relationships, primarily intimate partner and dating experiences. NVivo was used to allow a “bottom-up” design, emergent design, and interpretive inquiry for data analysis.

Findings

Two major themes emerged from the data: (1) developmental stage facilitates insight into the divorce process and (2) parental divorce leads to contemplating and reconceptualizing perceptions of self and interpersonal relationships.

Research limitations/implications

Results are relevant to researchers, parents, and practitioners as divorce is examined with a developmental lens. Findings suggest that the meaning and impact of parental divorce are distinct for emerging adult children, characterized by awareness and personal reflection. Implications for parenting and practice are provided.

Details

Divorce, Separation, and Remarriage: The Transformation of Family
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-229-3

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2016

Abstract

Details

Divorce, Separation, and Remarriage: The Transformation of Family
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-229-3

Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2016

Abstract

Details

Divorce, Separation, and Remarriage: The Transformation of Family
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-229-3

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Jeremy D. Moeller, Erica D. Culler, Mallori D. Hamilton, Keith R. Aronson and Daniel F. Perkins

Military-connected students experience a high rate of parental absence due to their parents’ military obligations. Military work-related parental absences can affect…

Abstract

Purpose

Military-connected students experience a high rate of parental absence due to their parents’ military obligations. Military work-related parental absences can affect school-aged children’s emotional and behavioural health and overall academic functioning. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The current review identified research studies that explored the effects of military-connected parental absence on school-aged children. Specifically, quantitative and qualitative research studies that examine the impact of military parental absences on dependent variables related to internalising and externalising behaviours and academic functioning were of interest. In all, 26 studies were identified for inclusion in the review.

Findings

Overall, military-connected students who experience a parental absence due to military service are more likely to exhibit an increase in problem behaviours and a decrease in academic functioning compared to civilian peers or military-connected peers who were not experiencing parental absence.

Originality/value

The current review elucidates parental absence within the military context, highlighting key factors that may contribute to increased and decreased behavioural and academic functioning of military-connected students. Results from the review in relation to risk and protective factors for military-connected students, future research and school programming directions are discussed.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

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