Search results

1 – 8 of 8
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Lauren M. Zimmerman and Malissa A. Clark

The purpose of this paper is to highlight an emerging and evolving area within women’s careers literature – women’s opting-out and opting-in experiences. Highlights from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight an emerging and evolving area within women’s careers literature – women’s opting-out and opting-in experiences. Highlights from several career theories, extant research, and a framework for women’s opting-out and opting-in experiences are discussed as well as future research considerations for women’s career breaks.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study provides the first synthesis of the theoretical and empirical work on women’s opting-out and opting-in experiences, by providing a framework that integrates existing research with the kaleidoscope career model. Published works from 1986 until the present were considered from psychology, management, sociology, and economics literatures.

Findings

This paper provides information about how women’s experiences of opting-out and opting-in to the workforce have emerged and evolved over the past few decades. Theoretical foundations, quantitative and qualitative research findings, and considerations for future research are discussed.

Practical implications

This paper is a useful source of information regarding an emerging and evolving area of studying within the women’s career literature. The paper discusses considerations for scholars and practitioners regarding developing, supporting, and retaining female talent amidst women’s career break experiences.

Originality/value

This paper provides an integrative framework that provides theoretical and empirical perspectives on the changing nature of women’s career values and choices, which influences their experiences of opting-out and opting-in to the workforce. Given both the changing demographics of the current workforce (e.g. increased women’s participation in the workforce) and women’s career values, research on women’s career breaks is warranted.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Malissa A. Clark, Gregory W. Stevens, Jesse S. Michel and Lauren Zimmerman

This chapter examines the role of leader workaholism in relation to their own and their followers’ well-being. We begin with an overview of workaholism, along with a

Abstract

This chapter examines the role of leader workaholism in relation to their own and their followers’ well-being. We begin with an overview of workaholism, along with a description of how workaholism may relate to typical leader behaviors. We propose a conceptual model linking the various components of workaholism to leaders’ well-being and followers’ well-being. In our model, we propose that leaders’ workaholism can negatively influence their own well-being, and also their followers’ well-being through interindividual crossover of affective, cognitive, and behavioral components of workaholism. Furthermore, the negative well-being outcomes experienced by the workaholic leader can also crossover to the followers through interindividual strain–strain crossover. Several moderating factors of these relationships are discussed, as well as avenues for future research.

Details

The Role of Leadership in Occupational Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-061-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Abstract

Details

The Role of Leadership in Occupational Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-061-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Abstract

Details

The Role of Leadership in Occupational Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-061-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Sancha D. Medwinter and Linda M. Burton

Low-income mothers who use welfare benefits are frequently portrayed as “faces of dependency” in the prevailing public discourse on America’s poor. This discourse, often…

Abstract

Low-income mothers who use welfare benefits are frequently portrayed as “faces of dependency” in the prevailing public discourse on America’s poor. This discourse, often anchored in race, class, and gender stereotypes, perpetuates the assumption that mothers on welfare lack skills to employ constructive agency in securing family resources. Scholars, however, have suggested that their welfare program use is embedded in complex survival strategies to make ends meet. While such studies emphasize maternal inventiveness in garnering necessary resources and support, this literature devotes little attention to the costs of these strategies on maternal power as well as how mothers negotiate gender and the oppression that usually accompanies such support. Feminist scholars in particular point to the importance of exploring these issues in the contexts of mothers’ romantic unions and client–caseworker relationships. Guided by an interpersonal, institutional, and intersectional framework, the authors explored this issue using longitudinal ethnographic data on 19 Mexican-immigrant, low-income mothers from the Three-City Study. Results showed mothers negotiated gender and power by simultaneously “doing,” “undoing,” and/or “redoing” gender using three strategies that emerged from the data: symbolic reliance, selective reliance, and creative nondisclosure. Implications of these findings for the future research are discussed.

Details

Marginalized Mothers, Mothering from the Margins
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-400-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2021

Malissa Maria Mahmud, Bradley Freeman and Mohd Syuhaidi Abu Bakar

With the arrival of the 4th Industrial Revolution and the Education 4.0 era, the inevitability of educators using technology in the classroom has grown. A global health…

Abstract

Purpose

With the arrival of the 4th Industrial Revolution and the Education 4.0 era, the inevitability of educators using technology in the classroom has grown. A global health pandemic has hastened the adoption of online teaching. The interdependence of technologies and pedagogies necessitates vigour and variability, along with evolving teaching and learning practices. Past literature has advocated for various roles and forms of technology in education; however, inconsistencies in “blended learning” definitions have posed challenges in understanding blended learning’s full potential. Thus, a quantitative meta-analysis was conducted to examine the efficacies and outcomes of blended learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative meta-analysis was conducted to examine the efficacies and outcomes of blended learning. A total of 96 samples were carefully chosen based on established theoretical definitions, relevant to technology use. The samples were then placed into three categories: Web-based applications, standalone applications and devices. Effect sizes (ESs) acquired from Cohen’s d formula (1988; 1992) were used to determine overall effectiveness. The ES of individuals in each of the delivery platform categories was totalled and averaged. This combined ES was then interpreted using Cohen’s (1988) benchmark. Subsequently, a combination of ESs was compared based on the similar type of delivery method, as well as the dependent variables in which the average of the respective combined ESs was calculated for interpretation.

Findings

Findings show that all three delivery methods were effective in enhancing a learner’s performance, especially for language teaching and learning. The study provides insights that can assist stakeholders in selecting different delivery platforms to befit the needs of discrete disciplines.

Originality/value

The researchers recommend the three categories of technological intervention described above as tangible tenets for future research in blended learning implementation. Thus far, no blended learning researcher has attempted to categorize the myriad of technological interventions available into concrete, concise groupings. With the recommended categories of technological intervention, blended learning practitioners would have a better sense of direction in the context of investigating the effectiveness of a specific intervention implemented. The researchers deem the recommended categories of technological intervention as immensely useful for the blended learning community to begin establishing intervention as one of the important elements to look at. For example, the effectiveness of a technological intervention under both the Web-based application and standalone application categories, respectively, in relation to a similar dependent variable can be compared to further understand the implications of using interventions of a different nature. And such studies will need to extend the investigation to the present by examining all recent studies.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Gregory W. Stevens

This chapter proposes a paradigm shift in considering the collective identification of employed physicians and how it influences physician engagement.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter proposes a paradigm shift in considering the collective identification of employed physicians and how it influences physician engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

There are many challenges for organizations employing physicians, particularly in terms of engagement in organizational initiatives. Prior research suggests this conflict stems from how physicians think of themselves as professionals versus employees (as forms of collective identification). Unfortunately, research is limited in addressing these dynamics.

Findings

This conceptual chapter considers the complex network of relationships that physicians perceive between the collectives to which they belong. A primary collective identification (i.e., the profession) is proposed to influence subsequent collective identification (i.e., the organization), and that these meanings and relationships along with contextual factors drive engagement.

Originality/value

Health care organizations increasingly rely on engagement from their physicians to improve upon coordinated care. This proposed conceptualization offers new insight into the dynamics surrounding how and why employed physicians become engaged.

Details

Annual Review of Health Care Management: Revisiting The Evolution of Health Systems Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-715-3

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

1 – 8 of 8