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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Sandra Waddock

Abstract

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Susan Forbes and Malcolm McIntosh

This study aims to examine the uptake of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the Asia Pacific region and to explore the extent to which countries in the region are…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the uptake of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the Asia Pacific region and to explore the extent to which countries in the region are transitioning towards a sustainable enterprise economy (SEE) and the links between the two, thereby connecting the uptake of CSR at the organisational level to the configuration and transformation of societies.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to examine the uptake of CSR in the Asia Pacific region and assess the extent to which countries are transitioning towards the SEE, this study compiles data from a selection of CSR‐related indicators that are globally harmonised and globally recognised as well as national performance indicators that not only set the operational context for organisations but also help to measure the ultimate impacts of policies, practices and activities by organisations on national conditions.

Findings

Based on the preliminary study undertaken into global national indicators in the Asia Pacific region, there is a need for more comprehensive indicators that capture key elements of a SEE. The study envisages the creation of a “Global SEE dashboard” of actual, real‐time key performance indicators that can help facilitate stewardship by societies towards the Global SEE.

Originality/value

By underscoring the needs, opportunities and challenges for CSR capacity‐building in the Asia Pacific region and for countries to transition effectively towards the SEE, this study adds value to the efforts of public and private policy makers concerned with CSR, sustainability and governance as well as practitioners and members of civil society interested in responsible global citizenship.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Malcolm McIntosh

As head of the corporate citizenship unit at the UK's Warwick Business School and a former European director of the Council on Economic Priorities Malcolm McIntosh is well…

Abstract

As head of the corporate citizenship unit at the UK's Warwick Business School and a former European director of the Council on Economic Priorities Malcolm McIntosh is well placed to assess the clamorous interest of businesses in the “values chain” since the launch last year of SA 8000. He talked to Jan Jonker about the spread of the international standard for social accountability and where it is leading.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Malcolm McIntosh

Abstract

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2010

Malcolm McIntosh

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the rethinking what it means to be human and our relationship with the Earth.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the rethinking what it means to be human and our relationship with the Earth.

Design/methodology/approach

The principles of the new economy were systemic, Earth‐centric and directly addressed a range of issues facing life on Earth: climate change, population, resource use, the global commons, governance, management and education.

Findings

In order to revisit the world and therefore co‐create a new future we need to adopt clear principles.

Originality/value

The paper argues that “CSR is dead” and at the same time say: “long live the sustainable enterprise economy”.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Marc J. Epstein and Kristi Yuthas

The paper's aim is to thoroughly examine solutions to mission diffusion and mission drift in the microfinance industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to thoroughly examine solutions to mission diffusion and mission drift in the microfinance industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Extensive field experience relating to individual microfinance institutions and industry trends provide the grounding for a review of the trade and academic literatures in microfinance and social enterprise management.

Findings

Mission diffusion arises from pursuing diverse approaches to poverty alleviation and addressing disparate and changing stakeholder interests. Mission drift arises from commercialization and conversion activities aimed toward enhancing ratings and achieving scale. Mission clarity can be regained through clarification of the mission along with more effective corporate governance and performance management systems, and a research function.

Practical implications

The tension between financial and social performance is not merely ideological – economic realities make it almost impossible to stay on mission. Understanding these realities can help microfinance institutions maintain and regain clarity of mission.

Originality/value

The paper sheds new light on solutions for challenges of mission drift and diffusion in the microfinance industry. Addressing this would enable the industry to deliver on promises of poverty alleviation during a period of heavy demand rapid scaling.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Carol A. Adams

Abstract

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Victoria A. Bakhtina

This paper seeks to discuss technology transfer – and its role in climate change mitigation – within the United Nations framework of sustainable development. Innovation is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss technology transfer – and its role in climate change mitigation – within the United Nations framework of sustainable development. Innovation is broadly considered as a tool to bring about breakthrough results in climate change alleviation. To ensure that innovative technology serves sustainable development, a massive international effort on the part of the regulators is required to create an integrated legislative framework to standardize eco‐innovation policies worldwide. To facilitate a global ecological regulatory framework, it is essential to use universal measurement tools which provide input to the decision‐making process at an international level, and address the mechanism of monitoring progress.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of eco‐innovation potential is introduced as one of the inputs to the decision‐making process on the global level. A composite index with such constituents as ecological balance (deficit or reserve), innovation, and energy intensity of economy, is built. The concept of innovation credits is introduced.

Findings

The simulation shows that ecological balance can potentially be increased for countries with greater eco‐innovation potential. The innovation credits can be given to countries with the highest eco‐innovation potential to foster eco‐innovation and perform technology transfer.

Originality/value

Earlier research developed focus on innovation as a means to transition to sustainable development and to create climate positive technological regimes applied at a national or industry level. The paper illustrates that the eco‐innovation potential index can be applied globally and can provide key input to the decision‐making process at a global level.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Judith A. Singleton, Lisa M. Nissen, Nick Barter and Malcolm McIntosh

Pharmaceuticals have played an important role in improving the quality of life of the human population in modern times. However, it must also be acknowledged that both the…

Abstract

Purpose

Pharmaceuticals have played an important role in improving the quality of life of the human population in modern times. However, it must also be acknowledged that both the production and use of pharmaceuticals have a significant, negative impact on the environment and consequently, a negative impact on the health of humans and wildlife. This negative impact is due to the embedded carbon in pharmaceuticals' manufacture and distribution and the waste generated in their manufacture, consumption and disposal. Pharmaceutical waste is comprised of contaminated waste (unwanted pharmaceuticals and their original containers) and non-contaminated waste (non-hazardous packaging waste). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is a literature review.

Findings

The article identified a gap in the literature around pharmacist attitudes and behaviour toward the environmentally responsible handling of pharmaceutical waste.

Originality/value

Pharmacists, with their professional commitment to the quality use of medicines and their active participation in the medicines management pathway, already play an important role in the more sustainable use of pharmaceuticals. Even so, they have the potential to play an even greater role with the environmentally responsible disposal of pharmaceutical waste (including packaging waste) and the education of other health professionals and the general public on this topic.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

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