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Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Ghazanfar Ali, Abdul Rahman Jaaffar and Juha Ali

Malaysian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are facing human capital development issues due to unskilled employees. The institutes of Malaysian education are…

Abstract

Malaysian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are facing human capital development issues due to unskilled employees. The institutes of Malaysian education are providing ineffective science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education which are generating unskilled graduates as a future workforce. The low capability of Malaysian graduates affect the performance of Malaysian SMEs. Therefore, the main purpose of this study is to examine the effect of STEM education in solving the human capital development issues for the enhancement of Malaysian SMEs performance. The current literature explores the ineffective system of STEM education for Malaysian graduates which result in human capital development issues in Malaysian SMEs. The curriculum of Malaysian education institutions plays a pivotal role in making the university graduates skillful since a teacher should teach the syllabus according to the need of the national curriculum and the student must learn practical knowledge for the sake of the professional employee in future. Hence, this study identified the significance of properly provided STEM education to deal with the human capital development issues faced by Malaysian SMEs. Effective STEM education is important in generating the human capital as it makes the university graduates skilled and capable which enable them to successfully meet the industry needs in future. Likewise, through the development of human capital, the performance of Malaysian SMEs could be improved.

Details

Modeling Economic Growth in Contemporary Malaysia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-806-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Gholamreza Dehdasht, M. Salim Ferwati, Nazirah Zainul Abidin and Michael Olubukola Oyedeji

The transition of Malaysia from a developing country to a developed country was considered in vision 2020, whereby an average construction contribution of 6.0% in growth…

Abstract

Purpose

The transition of Malaysia from a developing country to a developed country was considered in vision 2020, whereby an average construction contribution of 6.0% in growth domestic product (GDP) per annum was required. Despite this importance, still, the Malaysian construction industry has not reached the target yet. Understanding the weakness and strength of this industry can be an effective way to help the policymakers in selecting the best strategy in the promotion of the Malaysian construction industry in GDP growth. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the current issues and challenges faced by the contribution of the Malaysian construction industry in GDP growth.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve this objective, all the latest statistical data presented by the Department of Statistic and Construction Industry Development Board in Malaysia until March 2018 being collected and interpreted. Furthermore, through the literature review, the most significant challenges encountered by the Malaysian construction industry identified, compared and presented.

Findings

The results highlight that the contribution of Malaysian construction into GDP is increasing with a gentle slope. Nonetheless, the Malaysian construction industry has a high impact on the employment rate. More investment in the construction sector is required to meet an average of 6% contribution in GDP. Also, to be able to seize new opportunities in the global construction market, more exerted efforts have to overcome the challenges faced by this industry.

Practical implications

This study offers practical implications to policy and decision makers in the Malaysian construction industry. Despite the constant growth of the Malaysian construction industry in recent years, there is a need for more investments and overcome to challenges to encounter an average of 6% contribution in GDP. This study provides an overview and insights to investors, stockholders and managers to formulate a long-term plan promoting the efficiency of the Malaysian construction industry.

Originality/value

This study through explaining, comparing and interpreting the real statistical data, through the tables, figures and graphs, simplified the understanding of the weakness and strength of the Malaysian construction industry.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction , vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Hassan Abu Bakar and Che Su Mustaffa

Research on organizational communication has shown significant associations with many important outcomes. Although these researches are appealing, there have been…

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Abstract

Purpose

Research on organizational communication has shown significant associations with many important outcomes. Although these researches are appealing, there have been criticisms and suggestions for improvement of the organizational communication scales, developed in Western organization settings, to make them applicable to collectivist culture‐based organizations. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to access the organizational communication construct through the development and validation of an organizational communication measure for Malaysian organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Item analysis for Malaysian organizational communication scale involves survey of 250 university employees, followed by construct and criterion‐related validation using 346 employees, representing three organizations in Malaysia, resulting in a Malaysian organizational communication scale.

Findings

Through the validation of a Malaysian organizational communication measure, support was found for the proposition that Malaysian organizations are composed of information flow, communication climate, message characteristics, and communication structure, as well as new dimensions, namely, the group bond and respect.

Research limitations/implications

One of the weaknesses of the study was the size of sample used for the focus group. Another weakness was the organizations involved in the validation segment of the study, which were service‐related organizations. Finally, current investigations limit themselves to job satisfaction. These results have to be handled carefully.

Practical implications

The paper shows that group bond and mutual respect are salient work relationships in Malaysian organizations.

Originality/value

The emergence of group bond and respect dimensions in the Malaysian organizational communication construct is consistent with the examination of organizational behavior.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Azilah Anis, Rafikul Islam and Nur Anisah Abdullah

The paper aims to identify the emerging themes on the challenges faced by the Malaysian private higher learning institutions (HLIs) in the provision of providing quality education.

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to identify the emerging themes on the challenges faced by the Malaysian private higher learning institutions (HLIs) in the provision of providing quality education.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were purposively conducted with 29 of the Malaysian private HLI internal and external stakeholders ranging from the relevant personnel of the institutions (the quality director, administrators and senior academics), regulatory agencies, prospective employer, students and parents. Thematic analysis was then applied to analyze the participants’ responses in determining and clarifying the challenges faced by the Malaysian private HLIs in the issue of providing quality education.

Findings

Eight overarching themes were identified, namely, Academics, Facilities, Students, Programs and curriculum, Competition, Accreditation, Finance and Research. Academics represent the most frequent challenge raised by the participants, whereas Research emerged as the least mentioned challenge during the interview sessions.

Research limitations/implications

The present paper focused solely on Malaysian private HLIs, and thus, the findings may not be applicable to the foreign private HLIs that are operating in Malaysia as well as to the public HLIs.

Originality/value

The findings are expected to provide valuable guidelines to the Malaysian Private HLIs in areas where resources need to be critically disbursed. To the regulatory agencies and policy-makers, the findings could enlighten them on the difficulties faced by these privately funded institutions so that further policies can be designed and implemented to assist these institutions in their operations and long-term survival.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Nursyazwani Mohd Fuzi, Nurul Fadly Habidin, Sharul Effendy Janudin and Sharon Yong Yee Ong

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between environmental management accounting practices (EMAP), environmental management system (EMS) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between environmental management accounting practices (EMAP), environmental management system (EMS) and organizational performance (OPM) for Malaysian manufacturing industry by using structural equation modeling (SEM) approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The population of the Malaysian manufacturing industry comprised 2,600 manufacturing companies. The unit of analysis is the organization that participated in the survey comprised of automotive/machinery, plastics/rubber/metal, food/tobacco, electrical/electronics and chemical/woods. Out of the 2,600 questionnaires sent to the respondents, 395 were received from manufacturing companies. The collected data are analyzed with the IBM SPSS Statistics and SEM technique.

Findings

Findings found that EMS implementation as a partial mediator to improve EMAP and OPM for Malaysian manufacturing industry. Further, the implementation of EMS was found to mediate the relationship between EMAP and OPM.

Research limitations/implications

The understanding of the importance of studying the relationship between EMAP, EMS and OPM has been emphasized in the present study. In fact, the findings of this study along with its limitations have paved the way for future research in EMAP, EMS and OPM areas.

Practical implications

This research provides important guidelines for manufacturers and related companies to implement EMAP and EMS in order to improve OPM. Hence, the Malaysian manufacturing industry may need to consider the measurement of EMAP, EMS and OPM as beneficial to their manufacturing companies.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the environmental management accounting by empirically linking the relationship between EMAP, EMS and OPM for Malaysian manufacturing industry.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 37 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Peter Carlson

This empirical study examines the ability of the Anglo‐American model of accounting (AAM) to satisfy the financial information needs of report users in information exists…

348

Abstract

This empirical study examines the ability of the Anglo‐American model of accounting (AAM) to satisfy the financial information needs of report users in information exists in all nations. However, due to a number of factors, many LDCs and NICs, possess weak accounting functions. As a result, the flow of information is restricted. One remedy for a nation is to adopt a mature accounting system from an external source. Previous work has suggested that a foreign accounting system would be unable to satisfy the financial information needs of report users. This study proposes that the findings in the literature were based upon descriptive data, and that there has not been enough empirical assessment of the ability of imported systems to satisfy the information needs of report users. It was hypothesised in this study that the AAM is able to satisfy the needs of report users in Malaysia, and, that this could be achieved with limited detrimental effects. Accounting and cultural profiles were constructed to distinguish Malaysia from Anglo‐American nations. The works of Hofstede and Gray were prominent in the development of these profiles. A questionnaire was constructed and administered to Malaysian accountants. These accountants were used as a surrogate for members of the wider Malaysian business environment. The questionnaire examined the existence of specific quantitative and qualitative information characteristics in Malaysian accounting reports. The results provided evidence that the Malaysian accounting system, which had been based upon the AAM, was able to satisfy the financial information needs of report users in Malaysia. There was also, in the view of Malaysian accountants, an absence of detrimental side‐effects of adoption. These findings have implications for both prior research, and the alternatives available to nations. LDCs and NICs alike, for improving their accounting function.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Mario J. Miranda and K. Jegasothy

A better understanding of the response of shoppers in developing countries to inevitable product stock‐outs would help logisticians to put structures in place to reduce…

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Abstract

Purpose

A better understanding of the response of shoppers in developing countries to inevitable product stock‐outs would help logisticians to put structures in place to reduce the disruption. The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences in orientations that characterize shoppers’ responses to stock‐outs in retailing environments by comparing an emerging economy, Malaysia, with a developed economy, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

Randomly selected adult grocery shoppers across Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were surveyed to examine shoppers’ behavioural response to a most recent stock‐out of their preferred dairy item. This study followed the methodology and reporting framework adopted in an Australian study.

Findings

When responding to stock‐outs of their preferred grocery items, shopping lists serve as instruments that give archetypical Malaysian shoppers, unlike their Australian counterparts, a framework to adjust their budgets and seek alternatives within the store itself rather than venture to another store. Most Malaysian shoppers’ reactions to an out‐of‐stock situation, just as their Australian counterparts, appear to be underpinned by their household size. If their preferred item is not available, the frugal and observant among Malaysian shoppers, however, are not inclined as much as their Australian counterparts, to buy more of their alternative choice, even if these substitute items are discounted.

Research limitations/implications

Insight into Malaysian shoppers’ behavioural response to inadequate shelf life of perishable products, considering that they might feel impelled to act as per their shopping lists, would give members of the supply chain confidence to adopt inventory management policies that make a judicious balance between avoiding stock‐outs and ensuring stock availability with acceptable shelf life.

Practical implications

Malaysian frugal and observant shoppers when responding to stock‐outs of their preferred items might allow the opportunity to let a bargain pass on alternative brands or variants, because these shoppers, guided by their shopping lists, are possibly hamstrung, by budgetary constraints in not being able to make heavier purchase outlays and by likely storage constraints in their living accommodation. Retailers in Malaysia have a greater challenge than Australian retailers to dispose of stocks of grocery products that are fast approaching their expiry dates through discounting, because Malaysian shoppers may resist buying more than their immediate need.

Originality/value

Malaysian shoppers, inclined to carry memory scripts to assist them in their shopping efforts, are conditioned to stay within their planned budgets and when confronted with a stock‐out of their preferred item, are likely to resist buying anymore than what they had planned to buy.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Razali Haron and Salami Mansurat Ayojimi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Goods and Service Tax (GST) implementation on Malaysian stock market index.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Goods and Service Tax (GST) implementation on Malaysian stock market index.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used daily closing prices of the Malaysian stock index and futures markets for the period ranging from June 2009 to November 2016. Empirical estimation is based on the generalised autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (1, 1) model for pre- and post-announcement of the GST.

Findings

Result shows that volatility of Malaysian stock market index increases in the post-announcement than in the pre-announcement of the GST which indicates that educative programs employed by the government before the GST announcement did not yield meaningful result. The volatility of the Malaysian stock market index is persistent during the GST announcement and highly persistent after the implementation. Noticeable increase in post-announcement is in support with the expectation of the market about GST policy in Malaysia.

Practical implications

The finding of this study is consistent with expectation of the market that GST policy will increase the price of the goods and services and might reduce standard of living. This is supported by a noticeable increase in the volatility of the Malaysian stock market index in the post-announcement of GST which is empirically shown during the announcement and after the implementation of GST. Although the GST announcement could be classified as a scheduled announcement, unwillingness to accept the policy prevails in the market as shown by the increase in the market volatility.

Originality/value

Past studies on Malaysian stock market index volatility focus on the impact of Asian and global financial crisis whereas this study examines the impact of the GST announcement and implementation on the volatility of the Malaysian stock market index.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2020

Shehnaz Tehseen and Alistair R. Anderson

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent and types of entrepreneurial competences among culturally different ethnic groups in Malaysia. Malaysia offers us a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent and types of entrepreneurial competences among culturally different ethnic groups in Malaysia. Malaysia offers us a similar environment and ecosystem to make comparisons within a single context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper surveyed 600 respondents – 200 Malaysian Chinese, 200 Malaysian Indians and 200 Malays – and collected data about the types of competencies and about self-reported growth as firm performance. The study used PLS-SEM for inferential testing and PLS-MGA to conduct multigroup analysis among the three ethnic groups and found considerable and interesting differences.

Findings

The results of the nuanced, fine-grained findings showed a distinctive distribution of competencies. This study investigates the analysis further to argue that there is an ethnic disposition to favour and value different competencies. Broadly, Malaysian Chinese have a commercial outlook which contrasts with the Malaysian emphasis on social values such as family. Malaysian Indians’ competencies are similar to Malaysian Chinese’s, but with more social value emphasised. This distribution impacts on firm performance with Malaysian Chinese firms faring economically better. However, this economic measure takes no account of social measures which may be an important determinant and motivation for some ethnic groups.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretically, it becomes evident that one size does not fit all. In practice, different competencies are prioritised. Hence competencies appear to be culturally shaped. Culture influences what might be seen as very practical dimensions of entrepreneuring. From a practical perspective, those encouraging entrepreneurship should take such differences into account.

Originality/value

The study is original in comparing cultural effects on competencies and performance.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Brahim Saadouni and Jon Simon

The main objective of the paper is to examine and evaluate how security analysts in Thailand and Malaysia appraise ordinary shares and what sources of information they…

Abstract

The main objective of the paper is to examine and evaluate how security analysts in Thailand and Malaysia appraise ordinary shares and what sources of information they use. A questionnaire was sent to 570 sell‐side Thai securities analysts working for 63 stock brokering firms, and to 160 Malaysian analysts working for a sample of 24 stock brokering firms. Responses were received from 191 Thai analysts and 75 Malaysian analysts. The results reinforce and support our expectation that fundamental analysis is the primary method of investment appraisal. Of the Thai analysts, 147 (77 per cent) reported that fundamental analysis is ‘almost always’ used to value common stocks and a further 38 (nearly 20 per cent) reported that they ‘usually’ use fundamental analysis. Similarly, 73 per cent of Malaysian respondents indicated that fundamental analysis is almost always used and a further 18 per cent usually use it as a basis for valuing common stocks. The results also reveal that both groups rate profit and loss account, balance sheet, half‐yearly results, company annual report, and company visits as the most important sources of information. In terms of relative importance, Thai analysts view company visits as the most important source, while their Malaysian counterparts rate the profit and loss account first.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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