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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Malavika Desai, Bishakha Majumdar, Tanusree Chakraborty and Kamalika Ghosh

The study aims to establish the effect of personal resourcefulness and marital adjustment on job satisfaction and life satisfaction of working women in India.

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Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to establish the effect of personal resourcefulness and marital adjustment on job satisfaction and life satisfaction of working women in India.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 300 women are studied – 100 each in the working women, home‐based working women, and homemakers categories – using the following scales: socio economic status scale, general health questionnaire, self‐esteem inventory, life satisfaction scale, perceived stress scale, marital adjustment scale, the self‐control schedule, and job satisfaction questionnaire.

Findings

It is found that the home‐based working women are the least stressed, most well adjusted, and the most satisfied with their careers among the groups studied. Their ways of perceiving and handling stress are found to be more effective than those used by women in the other two groups.

Practical implications

The study implicates women friendly work policies – like flexible job hours and home office – as well as a cooperative home environment and assistance for housework. Stress relief programmes, yoga and an overall change of attitude towards housework, female employees and sex roles are needed.

Originality/value

The study shows that a positive attitude towards their work in the family and adoption of practical family‐friendly policies by organizations is likely to enhance productivity for the female workforce. Various need‐based interventions are suggested.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

Malavika Nair and Martha Njolomole

The purpose of this paper is to consider the success and failure of microfinance institutions in generating economic growth over the past 30 years and propose a dual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the success and failure of microfinance institutions in generating economic growth over the past 30 years and propose a dual criterion of evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

It surveys the empirical literature on microfinance and finds that while there has been small and localized success in various countries in improving access to credit, at the same time there has been a broader failure to generate economic growth. The authors argue that this broader failure should be viewed from the viewpoint of institutional failure or the lack of supporting institutions such as private property rights and stable rule of law within developing countries.

Findings

Using Baumol’s (1968) theory of entrepreneurship, the authors argue that the broader failure of microfinance is a case of poor institutional quality leading to unproductive or even destructive entrepreneurship rather than productive entrepreneurship. The paper also suggests a link between the literature criticizing foreign aid and this view on microfinance.

Originality/value

The paper provides a survey of the empirical literature on micro finance as well as a novel framework that aids in understanding both the localized small-scale success as well as broader failure to generate economic growth.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

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