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1 – 10 of 28
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

Collins Osei, Joseph Amankwah-Amoah, Zaheer Khan, Maktoba Omar and Mavis Gutu

In almost every large business, there is a growing recognition of the importance of organisational agility in improving their marketing responsiveness and business survival…

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Abstract

Purpose

In almost every large business, there is a growing recognition of the importance of organisational agility in improving their marketing responsiveness and business survival. However, limited insights have been offered by scholars on multinational enterprises and their marketing agility in emerging markets context. The purpose of this paper is to examine the various manifestations of agility and the various strategies adopted to sustain agility by an emerging economy multinational enterprise (EMNE) which started in the late 1990s as a small firm operating within the fresh fruit and juice industry in Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilised empirical qualitative data from an emerging African economy to develop a three-stage model of how agility manifests overtime.

Findings

The authors find that successful development and deployment of international marketing agility strategy adopted by an EMNE from emerging markets hinge on building relationships, being socially responsible and being innovative in standardisation and adaptation in response to, and in anticipation of, the rapidly changing business environment.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on data from one organisation. Future research can consider using multiple cases from different countries to further understand marketing agility in emerging markets and when such firms internalise into developed markets.

Originality/value

This paper extends research on standardisation/adaptation debate and research on agility, to address the gap on international marketing agility. Hitherto, there was no significant research on marketing agility in emerging markets which focused on highly perishable products such as fruits. This research provides unique insight into how marketing agility could be developed, deployed and sustained in emerging African markets.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Collins Osei, Maktoba Omar and Tasneem Suliman Joosub

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role colonial ties play in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI) to Ghana, several years after the official end of colonisation in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role colonial ties play in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI) to Ghana, several years after the official end of colonisation in the African continent. Colonisation left behind legacies of institutional framework, social ties and remnants of companies of colonial masters, which could potentially offer contemporary businesses from home countries the benefits of country of origin agglomeration.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses sequential explanatory mixed research design through 101 questionnaires and 8 interviews from the UK companies with FDI in Ghana. This approached enabled the initial quantitative results to be explored further through the qualitative data.

Findings

Colonial ties have limited influence on contemporary flow of FDI to Ghana, in spite of the institutional legacies between former colonisers and colonies. Majority of UK companies are influenced by agglomeration opportunities in general rather than country of origin agglomeration. However, country of origin agglomeration remains important to over a third of the companies surveyed.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was taken from the non-extractive industry in Ghana, and caution must be applied in generalising the findings. However, some universal issues concerning agglomeration and institutions are discussed.

Originality/value

Although there has been some research on colonial history and its impact on FDI in Africa, existing knowledge on bilateral relations is rather limited. Unlike previous studies, this research provides depth by examining colonial influence on FDI between two countries, using two key concepts: country of origin agglomeration and institutions. It provides UK companies with contemporary views to consider when exploring FDI opportunities in Ghana, particularly in relation to the effects of the colonial history. It also provides investment promotion agencies with empirical results on the importance of various forms of agglomeration and institutions for FDI attraction.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2018

Lars Hendrik Achterberg, Maktoba Omar, Ambisisis Ambituuni and Oliver Roll

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the external antecedents of pricing information acquisition in an integrative manner. The study develops understanding of determinants of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the external antecedents of pricing information acquisition in an integrative manner. The study develops understanding of determinants of information acquisition as a crucial prerequisite of successful pricing strategies within German small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

A large scale survey of sampled 2,542 SMEs was conducted. A total of 220 questionnaires were completed, reflecting a response rate of 9 per cent. This was acceptable considering the sensitivity of pricing issues. A final sample of 173 usable questionnaires were obtained.

Findings

The result indicates that external antecedents of pricing information acquisition practices have a positive impact on SME pricing performance, and pricing performance is positively related to firm performance.

Practical implications

The study indicates that external antecedents of pricing information acquisition are strategic pricing capabilities, which should receive attention by SME managers.

Originality/value

This study bridges significant obstacle to knowledge generation and theory development of the important issues of pricing information acquisition in SMEs.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Nathalia Christiani Tjandra, John Ensor, Maktoba Omar and John R. Thomson

This study aims to investigate the applicability of Ritter’s (2000) framework of interconnectedness in a triadic relationship between a provider, intermediaries and customers and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the applicability of Ritter’s (2000) framework of interconnectedness in a triadic relationship between a provider, intermediaries and customers and to extend the framework by considering how the state of the relationships in a triad influences the relationship dynamic.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study research method with multiple sources of evidence was adopted in this study. The case study focusses on a triadic relationship of one of the largest UK-based financial services institutions, Provider XYZ, with independent financial advisers and customers.

Findings

The findings confirm that the synergy effect, lack effect, competition effect and by-pass effect exist in the triadic relationship. The findings also acknowledge that the state of the relationships in a triad, whether they are positive (+), negative (−) or neutral (0), combined with the identified interconnectedness effect determine the dynamic of the triadic relationship network.

Originality/value

This paper extends the existing framework of interconnectedness by considering how the change of the relationship state changes the relationship dynamic in a triad. By evaluating both the effect of interconnectedness and the state of the relationships in a triad, managers can identify and manage possible conflicts in a triad and enhance the effectiveness of the triadic relationship.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Michael Lewrick, Maktoba Omar, Robert Raeside and Klaus Sailer

Entrepreneurship and innovation education has derived from established university curriculum and the context is set of concepts and tools used in the corporate world. The…

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Abstract

Entrepreneurship and innovation education has derived from established university curriculum and the context is set of concepts and tools used in the corporate world. The challenge of transforming a start‐up company into a business success needs different capabilities. It goes beyond the development of an idea and writing‐up a comprehensive business plan. This study analysed over 200 technology‐driven companies which have been created under the formal requirement of a business plan competition since 1996. The objective was to identify drivers for innovation and success. From the results, an agenda of entrepreneurial and innovation education was derived and is discussed.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Maktoba Omar and John Ensor

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Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Robert L. Williams, Maktoba Omar and John Ensor

Much has been written concerning the value and validity of the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) model, as a strategy for multi‐national corporation (MNC) growth. The model presented in…

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Abstract

Purpose

Much has been written concerning the value and validity of the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) model, as a strategy for multi‐national corporation (MNC) growth. The model presented in this paper adds to the discussion of strategic possibilities to tap the potential of emerging markets. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first discusses trends in economic growth in emerging markets, global strategies, and the BOP market, then analyzes the blue ocean strategy (BOS) of value innovation.

Findings

The paper develops the Value Flame at the Base of the Pyramid (VFBOP) model by combining BOP and BOS strategies to potentially offer opportunities for MNC market entry as well as market supply, to drive revenues and expand global market share.

Research limitations/implications

As a concept, the model must be validated by empirical and case research to ascertain the shape and dynamics of the model. Future research can establish the parameters of the flame.

Originality/value

It is believed that the VFBOP model is the first to address some of the limitations of BOP strategy while profiting from the BOS model, in order to fully benefit from sourcing and selling to emerging markets.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Victoria L. Rodner, Maktoba Omar and Elaine Thomson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether and how participating in a branded Biennale (Venice) may legitimate and promote selected artists from the emerging markets of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether and how participating in a branded Biennale (Venice) may legitimate and promote selected artists from the emerging markets of Venezuela and Thailand alongside art market leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

Research was conducted at the 53rd International Art Biennale in Venice, Italy, in June 2009. Underpinned by a constructivist approach, qualitative data were collected via participant observation, illustrative photography and semi‐structured interviews (average interview time 55 minutes) with curators and participating artists from two emerging markets: Venezuela and Thailand.

Findings

This research indicates that merely attending the Venice Biennale does not mean automatic branding for success: each artist's signature style must stand out within its cultural context for the branding effect to succeed. The conclusion compares and contrasts the effective relationship between identification and success for the two emerging economies within the world‐leader arts event in Venice.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing body of knowledge on arts management and events management, focusing on the until now unexplored area of contemporary arts marketing for the emerging economies of Venezuela and Thailand. The paper may aid emerging market art professionals in their strategy and planning to better benefit from the Venice Biennale's branding opportunity, as well as guiding scholarly research to a better understanding of the area.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Collins Osei and Ayantunji Gbadamosi

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to explore how Africa has been branded, and to suggest ways the continent could be re‐branded to attract both international and domestic…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to explore how Africa has been branded, and to suggest ways the continent could be re‐branded to attract both international and domestic investments.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive review of literature that encapsulates branding, nation branding, place/destination branding, foreign direct investment and issues associated with investment opportunities in Africa was conducted towards exploring how Africa has been branded and could be re‐branded.

Findings

This paper finds that the extant literature is replete with publications that essentially associate Africa, as a brand, to poverty, underdevelopment, corruption, doom, pestilence and several other inauspicious features. Nonetheless, the article also shows that there are several existing virtues especially in the form of business opportunities in several sectors that could be accorded extensive publicity to espouse the continents' brand equity. These range from agriculture, to tourism, to real estate, to sports and several existing foreign direct investments already thriving in several parts of the continent. Hence, the suggestion for re‐branding Africa as a viable continent for global business transactions is strongly emphasised in the article.

Practical implications

This paper has a significant implication for positioning Africa as a relevant business partner in the global marketplace by echoing the extensive business opportunities that await both the indigenous and foreign investors in the continent.

Originality/value

The article espouses the brand equity of Africa as a continent and suggests avenues for constantly communicating the inherent virtues of the content to the world towards maintaining her rightful position in the international business community.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Maktoba Omar and Marc Porter

The purpose of this paper is to investigate empirically the influence of six key contextual determinants upon the degree of standardization for firms who enter a new market…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate empirically the influence of six key contextual determinants upon the degree of standardization for firms who enter a new market directly. In the context of international business market entry, much research emphasis has been placed upon the issues of standardization versus modification. Generally, however, this research focuses on promotion and advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates the research variables that influence standardization/modification decisions in a framework comprising “firm or company context” and “host country context”. The research, undertaken with a sample of 700 UK‐based for‐profit organizations, adapts and further develops Hofstede's study.

Findings

It identifies that the elements of competition and political risk are negatively significant in relation to the degree of standardization. In addition, economic development and international experience are positively significant in relation to the degree of standardization. Firm size and culture differences have no impact upon the degree of standardization.

Research limitations/implications

Research is only conducted among British companies operating cross border.

Originality/value

This paper's originality is in providing specific types of elements as risk reducers in a firm's market entry strategy.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

1 – 10 of 28