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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Makoto Matsuo and Motohiro Aihara

A community of practice (CoP) is believed to be a driver for knowledge creation but it can hinder knowledge sharing across boundaries. Drawing on social cognitive theory…

Abstract

Purpose

A community of practice (CoP) is believed to be a driver for knowledge creation but it can hinder knowledge sharing across boundaries. Drawing on social cognitive theory, this study aims to investigate how a CoP within a single unit promotes knowledge sharing with other units by examining the mediating effect of the members’ learning goals (LG).

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was conducted using a two-wave survey data on nurses from eight Japanese hospitals (n =263).

Findings

The results indicated that LG fully and positively mediated the effect of a CoP on the knowledge-sharing intention of one unit toward other units and that LG fully and negatively mediated the effect of a CoP on knowledge withholding (KW) from other units.

Practical implications

Knowledge managers need to note that intellectual benefits from experienced CoP can play a key role in reducing the perceived risks associated with members’ knowledge sharing and in creating effective knowledge sharing with other units.

Originality/value

The main contribution is to identify the process by which CoP promotes knowledge sharing and prevents KW across boundaries mediated through LG. This study is the first to quantitatively show how LG cross inter-professional barriers caused by CoPs.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Makoto Matsuo, Takami Matsuo and Kohei Arai

Although middle managers play important roles in forming strategies and generating innovation, few studies have explored the influence of management control systems (MCS…

Abstract

Purpose

Although middle managers play important roles in forming strategies and generating innovation, few studies have explored the influence of management control systems (MCS) on employees’ behaviors or performance at the middle-management level. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect an interactive use of MCS has on individual performance at the unit level.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal, multisource and multilevel survey was conducted among 373 nurses in 20 units at a Japanese public hospital.

Findings

The multi-level analyzes indicate that middle managers’ interactive use of MCS has a direct and indirect positive influence on individual performance, through proactive behavior, as well as through psychological empowerment and, subsequently, through proactive behavior.

Research limitations/implications

As the present study collected data from nurses at a Japanese hospital, it is necessary to conduct research in other countries using different occupations to verify the findings.

Practical implications

Organizations need to be aware that the interactive use of MCS can be an effective tool for empowering and motivating employees.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to the literature by clarifying the mechanisms of how the interactive use of MCS influences employees’ psychological and behavioral outcomes at the middle-management level.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Makoto Matsuo, Kohei Arai and Takami Matsuo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct and indirect effects of managerial coaching on critical reflection mediated through learning goal orientation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct and indirect effects of managerial coaching on critical reflection mediated through learning goal orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a questionnaire survey of 169 employees in 53 teams at an IT firm in Japan. The data were examined using multi-level analyses.

Findings

Managerial coaching has a direct positive effect on critical reflection, and the relationship is mediated by learning goal orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The characteristics of the sample may limit the generalization of the findings. Future research should verify the model in other industries and countries.

Practical implications

The organizations should note that managerial coaching is useful not only for facilitating employees’ problem-solving but also for enhancing their critical reflection. It should also be noted that employees can reflect critically on their beliefs and work routines when they have learning goals.

Originality/value

Although few quantitative studies have investigated the determinants of critical reflection, the present research reveals the overlooked functions of managerial coaching in promoting employees’ learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Makoto Matsuo and Takami Matsuo

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of managerial coaching, as well as interactive and diagnostic uses of management control systems (MCS), on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of managerial coaching, as well as interactive and diagnostic uses of management control systems (MCS), on reflection and critical reflection, which are important for team learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a questionnaire survey. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to test hypotheses using data from 235 employees in 50 teams from a Japanese automotive supplier.

Findings

The results indicated that: MCS used interactively have a positive influence on critical reflection in teams; MCS used diagnostically have no significant effect on reflection or critical reflection in teams; and managerial coaching has a positive influence on team reflection.

Research limitations/implications

These findings suggest that the interactive use of MCS should be combined with managerial coaching in promoting reflection and critical reflection within teams. Because this study used data from employees of a Japanese automotive supplier, the results may have been influenced by the Japanese management style.

Practical implications

Organizations need to implement interactive MCS at the team level, while coaching programs should be provided for managers to enhance team learning.

Originality/value

This study extends the existing literature by examining the effect of MCS at the team level, and identifying that managerial coaching plays a complementary role, supporting the interactive use of MCS in promoting reflection within a team.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Makoto Matsuo

Although the relationship between leadership behaviors and team reflexivity has been investigated in prior research, little is known about the dimensions of reflective…

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Abstract

Purpose

Although the relationship between leadership behaviors and team reflexivity has been investigated in prior research, little is known about the dimensions of reflective leadership or leadership behaviors that facilitate reflection in a group or organization. This paper aims to examine the interrelated characteristics of reflective leadership behaviors that promote team learning using survey data.

Design/methodology/approach

Because this research was exploratory in nature, a research model was developed based on the preliminary research. The research model was tested using a quantitative study of 507 employees in 98 teams.

Findings

Results of regression analyses of a group-level study revealed three types of reflective leadership – open reflection, problem-based reflection and goal-based reflection – and found that only the open reflection and goal-based reflection were positively related to team learning.

Research limitations/implications

As reflective leadership has not been examined in previous studies, the research model and the measurement scales were developed based on preliminary research in the present research.

Practical implications

Team leaders need to understand that goal-based reflection plays a central role in reflecting on their work because it may provide members with criteria to recognize whether they are on the right track.

Originality/value

The present research revealed three dimensions of reflective leadership that had not been adequately investigated previously.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Makoto Matsuo

This study aims to examine how perceived supervisor support for strengths use (PSSSU) directly and indirectly facilitates career satisfaction and perceived employability…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how perceived supervisor support for strengths use (PSSSU) directly and indirectly facilitates career satisfaction and perceived employability as mediated by strengths use behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-wave questionnaire survey was administered to nurses (n = 221) and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results indicated that PSSSU directly enhanced career satisfaction and indirectly enhanced perceived employability through strengths use behavior.

Research limitations/implications

As the sample was limited to nurses in a Japanese hospital, it is possible that the characteristics of the national culture and occupation affected the results.

Practical implications

Support for strengths use is important especially in stressful work environments in order to retain professional employees by enhancing their employability and career satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature by identifying the different effects of PSSSU on the two types of career-related well-being. The present research is the first study to show the mediating role played by strengths use behavior in linking PSSSU to perceived employability.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Makoto Matsuo

Although positive psychology emphasizes the importance of reflecting on success in promoting strengths use and self-efficacy, no research has developed a measure of…

Abstract

Purpose

Although positive psychology emphasizes the importance of reflecting on success in promoting strengths use and self-efficacy, no research has developed a measure of reflection on success. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate the scales for reflection on success and failures.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 was conducted to extract the dimensions of reflection on success and failures using survey data from nurses (n = 298), whereas Study 2 involved validation of the scales using a two-wave survey of physical therapists (n = 291).

Findings

In Study 1, the factors of “reflection on success” and “reflection on failures” were extracted by exploratory factor analysis. In Study 2, the discriminant validity of the two scales was established via confirmatory factor analyses. The structural equation modeling results indicated that reflection on success promoted work authenticity, work engagement and strengths use, while reflection on failures only promoted work engagement, indicating the convergent validity of the scales.

Research limitations/implications

As the research subjects were medical professionals in Japan, the scales need to be validated with samples from a wide range of occupations and cultural backgrounds, in future research.

Originality/value

The present research expands the literature on reflection and strengths-based approach by introducing the “success–failures” dimension based on positive psychology, broaden-and-build theory and job demands–resources theory.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2020

Makoto Matsuo

Although positive psychology asserts that authenticity comes from identifying and using our strengths, no quantitative research has been conducted to test that…

Abstract

Purpose

Although positive psychology asserts that authenticity comes from identifying and using our strengths, no quantitative research has been conducted to test that relationship. This study aims to examine the mediating role of work authenticity in linking strengths use to career satisfaction and proactive behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a two-wave survey with nurses in two large, acute hospitals in Japan (n = 298), a structural equation model was produced.

Findings

The results show that work authenticity fully mediated between strengths use and career satisfaction, and that work authenticity partially mediated between strengths use and proactive behavior.

Research limitations/implications

As work authenticity, career satisfaction and proactive behavior were measured at time 2, it is desirable to conduct a three-wave survey to measure these variables separately in future research.

Practical implications

It may be imperative to recognize that employees who use their strengths are satisfied with their careers only by enhancing authenticity at work.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study was to identify the mediating role of work authenticity in linking strengths use to both career-related well-being and proactive work behaviors.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2020

Takuro Tsukube and Makoto Matsuo

Although cognitive apprenticeship has been widely used in various educational fields, few empirical studies have examined its effectiveness in a workplace context. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Although cognitive apprenticeship has been widely used in various educational fields, few empirical studies have examined its effectiveness in a workplace context. This study aims to investigate the effects of cognitive apprenticeship on junior doctors’ perceived professional growth in hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective questionnaire survey was performed that asked surgeons (n = 87) and physicians (n = 92) to recall how they were instructed by their supervisors during the first five years after graduation from medical school.

Findings

The results of multiple regression analyzes showed that all dimensions of cognitive apprenticeship (modeling, coaching, scaffolding, articulation, reflection and exploration) had positive effects on each doctor’s perceived growth, regardless of the type of clinical practice (surgeon vs physician) or the period of supervision. It was also found that physicians experienced significantly more coaching and scaffolding, and opportunities for, articulation and reflection, than surgeons.

Research limitations/implications

Some of the data were collected through snowball sampling, and this study used a retrospective survey in which respondents were asked to recall past experiences.

Practical implications

Clinical supervisors in hospitals should adopt a cognitive apprenticeship model when supervising junior doctors. Surgical supervisors need to be more conscious of the benefits of cognitive apprenticeship.

Originality/value

This study confirmed that the six dimensions of cognitive apprenticeship had positive influences on the perceived growth of junior doctors, regardless of their clinical domains or period of supervision and that clinical domains influence the implementation of cognitive apprenticeship.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2018

Makoto Matsuo

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mechanism by which learning goal orientation (LGO) promotes work engagement through job crafting (seeking challenges).

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1685

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mechanism by which learning goal orientation (LGO) promotes work engagement through job crafting (seeking challenges).

Design/methodology/approach

A moderated mediation model was tested using survey data from 266 public health nurses and hospital nurses in Japan.

Findings

The results indicated that job crafting partially mediated the relationship between LGO and work engagement, and that the mediation effect was stronger when reflection was high (vs middle and low).

Research limitations/implications

Although common method bias and validity of measurement were evaluated in this paper, the survey data were cross-sectional.

Practical implications

The results suggest that selecting people with a stronger sense of LGO may be a useful strategy for promoting job crafting and work engagement in an organization. Additionally, organizations should give employees opportunities to reflect on their jobs and to craft them into more challenging ones in the workplace.

Originality/value

Although little is known about mechanisms by which LGO promotes work engagement, this study found that job crafting and reflection play important roles in linking LGO and work engagement.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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