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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Maude Brunet and Monique Aubry

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the process of translation of an institutionalized governance framework as adapted to a major project in practice. Although…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the process of translation of an institutionalized governance framework as adapted to a major project in practice. Although infrastructure projects have been studied for decades, most studies have emphasized economic or contingency-based perspectives. Of those studies, some researchers have focused on governance frameworks for public infrastructure projects, and their impact for shaping the front-end phase of those projects. Yet, little is known about the way actors translate and enact those governance frameworks into practice. Understanding this translation process will lead to a better understanding of the overall performance of major infrastructure projects.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research is based on a case study of one public infrastructure project in the health sector in Quebec, Canada. Through non-participant observation and interviews, the planning phase of the project is presented as it unfolds.

Findings

The process of translation is presented, from the ostensive, institutionalized governance framework, to appropriation into performative practices, which resulted in 12 specific practices: four “structuring” practices at the institutional level, five “normalizing” practices at the organizational level and three “facilitating” practices at the project level.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is to enrich our understanding of the governance of major public infrastructure projects with process- and practice-based theories.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Carlos A. Arboleda and Dulcy M. Abraham

The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology to evaluate the capital investments in infrastructure projects managed by private operators considering uncertainties…

1628

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology to evaluate the capital investments in infrastructure projects managed by private operators considering uncertainties in the operation and maintenance of the infrastructure components.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology described in this paper is based on two major sources of information: deterioration curves of the infrastructure systems obtained from Markov chain models and the value of flexibility obtained from a real options analysis.

Findings

Using this methodology, it is possible to determine whether there is value if project managers adopt flexible strategies in determining capital investments. These strategies refer to the opportunities of postponing, deferring or canceling capital investments required to maintain the operation of the infrastructure systems.

Research limitations/implications

The model utilizes Monte Carlo simulation and real options analysis to overcome the complexities associated with the solution of the differential equations that represent the variability of the main factors in the project cash flow.

Originality/value

The methodology presented in this paper can be used by public officials, private investors, and asset managers to determine the value of flexibility associated with the strategies required to maintain the operation of infrastructure assets.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Yongjian Ke, Xinbo Zhao, Yingying Wang and ShouQing Wang

The purpose of this paper is to help domestic private enterprises (DPEs) identify their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) in developing…

2509

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to help domestic private enterprises (DPEs) identify their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) in developing infrastructure projects in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on extensive literature reviews coupled with brainstorming and interviews methodologies to compile a list of SWOT factors for DPEs in developing infrastructures. To validate the significance of the identified SWOT list, a questionnaire survey is thus carried out.

Findings

The paper identifies 16 strengths, 15 weaknesses, 16 opportunities, and 21 threats for DPEs in developing infrastructure projects in China. The opinions of respondents from different sectors are sought and evaluated to obtain the relative significance of these factors. A set of major SWOT hypotheses is then derived using factor analysis.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited to identifying SWOT factors in common, therefore the next step should be proposing an adjustment framework to support decision marking.

Practical implications

These findings should provide a valuable reference not only for DPEs but also for foreign investors who are planning to invest in infrastructure projects in China.

Originality/value

The investors in both rounds of infrastructure investments in China in the last two decades have limitations. Foreign investors acting as the major player in the first round usually charge higher and prefer operating projects in more developed regions, while state‐owned enterprises as the principal player in the second round are inefficient in the operation and management, which largely restrained the advantages of public‐private partnership model. Therefore, there is an urgent need to explore the potential of DPEs, another potential major player in developing infrastructure projects. To this end, this paper provides valuable information through a comprehensive SWOT analysis to the DPEs.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

STEN MELSON and TORBEN KRONSTAM

eLSEwise is a User Reference Project under the EU ESPRIT programme. The objective of eLSEwise is to analyse the Large Scale Engineering (LSE) sector in terms of IT usage…

Abstract

eLSEwise is a User Reference Project under the EU ESPRIT programme. The objective of eLSEwise is to analyse the Large Scale Engineering (LSE) sector in terms of IT usage and business perspectives. Based on an analysis of the LSE sector today, the trends in the LSE worldwide market, the trends in the IT industry and a future LSE vision are defined. A ‘road map’ guiding the European LSE industry from where it is today to where the vision sets the goal 10–15 years ahead has been developed. This paper is about the approach adopted by the Danish National Railway Agency (DNRA) in dealing with infrastructure projects. DNRA represents one of the target business areas of eLSEwise: transportation. DNRA is the owner and manager of the Danish national railway infrastructure. Like most European railway companies DNRA is facing major changes, moving from monopoly into a profitable, self‐sustained business. At the same time major infrastructure projects are planned and executed, aiming at the creation of a trans‐European high speed network, and at the general revitalization of the European railway sector. After a presentation of DNRA's business and technical context and major current projects, the paper discusses the eLSEwise perspective of life‐cycle oriented infrastructure management and the integrational aspects related to execution of a major infrastructure project and subsequent facility management. Finally, the paper identifies the major gaps between the current situation and the eLSEwise vision of life‐cycle oriented total management of large scale engineering facilities like railway sections.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Soroush Maghsoudi, Colin Duffield and David Wilson

Unlike manufacturing and research and developments, major infrastructure projects rarely emphasize or drive their objectives on the basis of innovation. This is in part…

Abstract

Purpose

Unlike manufacturing and research and developments, major infrastructure projects rarely emphasize or drive their objectives on the basis of innovation. This is in part because of a risk-averse culture, yet conceivably great benefits and opportunities are being lost because of this behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The case for focusing on innovation in infrastructure projects is that the reasons driving innovation are not fully understood, and this impedes the effective implementation of lessons learned for the numerous innovative projects into practice more generally. The purpose of this study was to discover how innovation is produced and captured in major infrastructure projects in Australia and to understand how innovation may be replicated for future projects through refinement of design, project management, finance and procurement.

Findings

Engineering and project managers may find this paper helpful to better understand how innovation might happen in infrastructure projects and what different forms it can take.

Originality/value

The findings of this study demonstrate that people and culture drive consistent successful infrastructure outcomes more than simply the development of new products or processes.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2021

Benjamin O.L. Bowles, Kate Bayliss and Elisa Van Waeyenberge

Despite the fact that recent anthropological interest in infrastructure has done much to illuminate the infrastructure asset as an assemblage of actors, technologies and…

Abstract

Despite the fact that recent anthropological interest in infrastructure has done much to illuminate the infrastructure asset as an assemblage of actors, technologies and ideas, an interdisciplinary approach is required to unpack how the infrastructure project comes together as an assemblage and to define the role that financial technologies and discourses play in shaping it. Here, an interdisciplinary approach is applied to a novel infrastructure asset, London's Thames Tideway Tunnel, in order to show how multiple actors and visions of the world are brought together to make the infrastructure asset come to fruition. The paper concludes that this interdisciplinary approach to infrastructure can allow us to keep multiple sides of the infrastructure project in sight simultaneously. This includes both the creation of a rhetorical vision and spectacle around the asset, and the underlying financial arrangements that bind it together. If we do so, we can understand how new infrastructural forms utilise particular financial technologies and ideas to change the relationship between the public and the private, and between consumers and providers, and act towards the creation of a new ‘public good’ that normalises private provision.

Details

Infrastructure, Morality, Food and Clothing, and New Developments in Latin America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-434-3

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

David Besanko and João Tenreiro Gonçalves

Rede Alta Velocidade, SA (RAVE), the state-owned company responsible for planning and developing a major high-speed rail project in Portugal, must persuade both public…

Abstract

Rede Alta Velocidade, SA (RAVE), the state-owned company responsible for planning and developing a major high-speed rail project in Portugal, must persuade both public officials and lenders that the project is worth undertaking. It must also make a recommendation on the appropriate organizational form for the enterprise. Specifically, it must determine the role of the Portuguese government in financing and operating the high-speed rail network, with options ranging from full development and management of the project by the public sector to completely private development and management. Lying in between these two polar cases were a variety of hybrid models, often referred to as public-private partnerships (PPPs). Using data in the case, students have the opportunity to perform a benefit-cost analysis of the project. They also must think carefully about the optimal role of the government in a major new infrastructure project.

After analyzing and discussing the case, students will be able to:

  • Understand the nature of a global public good

  • Perform a back-of-the-envelope benefit-cost analysis of polio eradication

  • Discuss the appropriate strategy for eradicating an infectious disease

  • Apply game theory to analyzing which countries would be likely to contribute funds toward global polio eradication

  • Discuss the role of private organizations in the provision of global public goods

Understand the nature of a global public good

Perform a back-of-the-envelope benefit-cost analysis of polio eradication

Discuss the appropriate strategy for eradicating an infectious disease

Apply game theory to analyzing which countries would be likely to contribute funds toward global polio eradication

Discuss the role of private organizations in the provision of global public goods

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Thibaut Mourgues and Christian Kingombe

This article suggests that given the fulfilment of a number of preconditions Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs) may be attractive instruments for countries in Africa…

Abstract

This article suggests that given the fulfilment of a number of preconditions Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs) may be attractive instruments for countries in Africa seeking to improve the quality and competitiveness of their services base, particularly the so-called infrastructure services. This article builds, in addition to a selective review of the vast literature on PPPs, on first-hand practical experience on the ground and a number of pilot projects. This methodological approach provides a non-exhaustive PPP mapping in Africa, which in turn leads to a discussion of some of the challenges and risks to PPPs in Africa. It also covers a discussion of the recent trends in the approach to improving the enabling environment upon which are based a few policy recommendations, respectively: establishing an institutional framework for PPPs; designing a realistic and efficient strategy for enabling environment improvement; and finally moving from national-level initiatives to intergovernmental initiatives. This article takes the position that a series of pitfalls and shortcomings, many of which are associated with the enabling institutional environment and the governance framework, need to be addressed if PPPs are to deliver their full potential in Africa. It is believed that the national and intergovernmental PPP initiatives could lend significant support to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in Africa. In addition to the reviewing and discussing primarily the most recent literature on PPPs, the main value addition of our chapter brings to the literature is derived from the presentation of recent PPP cases, which draw directly from the authors own practical experience on the ground.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Public–Private Partnerships in Developing and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-494-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Yvon Dufour, Peter Steane and Lawrence Wong

The purpose of this paper is to look into the fate of a troubled initiative in one of Hong Kong's economic engines – the container handling industry – that was developed…

563

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look into the fate of a troubled initiative in one of Hong Kong's economic engines – the container handling industry – that was developed in the midst of the discussions between Beijing and London leading towards the historical 1997 handover.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a qualitative in‐depth analysis of a longitudinal case study, the impact of the historical context is shown.

Findings

The data suggest that the forecasting gaps are residual of prolonged decision‐making processes featuring a diversity of stakeholders pursuing their respective agendas and making the best of the opportunities presented by powerful contextual events such as the historical 1997 restoration.

Research limitations/implications

A few aspects of the forecasting process make a difference in the likelihood that the traffic forecasts will prove more accurate: improving the interconnectedness of the forecasting tasks; eliminating the problem of assumption drag; and developing knowledge in sociopolitical forecasting.

Originality/value

The value of this longitudinal case study lies in showing that major transport infrastructure forecasts are neither a deceptive nor meaningless series of projections to cool down potential opposition, as argued by the proponents of the political approach. Building a major transport infrastructure takes place through a nest of multifarious and unpredictable processes, intertwined with patterns of other strategic decisions and actions undertaken either by the public or by the private organizations involved, and influenced by major contingencies and historical contextual events over time.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

Keywords

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