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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Tariq Bhatti and Maizaitulaidawati Md Husin

The purpose of this study is to apply the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in predicting the intention to participate in family takaful schemes (FTSs) in the United Arab…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to apply the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in predicting the intention to participate in family takaful schemes (FTSs) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). One area of concern for takaful operators is their untapped market and lower market share compared to those of their conventional insurance counterparts. It is possible that the investigation of direct and indirect (belief based) measures of TPB could shed some light on these concerns and possibly offer some assistance to takaful operators.

Design/methodology/approach

Interrelationships among attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral controls (PBCs) and intention to participate in FTSs were examined. The relationships between behavioral beliefs on attitudes, normative beliefs on subjective norm and control beliefs on PBC were also assessed to fully identify the structures underlying factors measuring intentions. The respondents consisted of 175 Muslims in the UAE. Data were collected using an online survey and analyzed using SPSS.

Findings

This study found that attitudes, subjective norms and PBCs contribute to the prediction of the intention to participate in FTSs. This study used standard multiple regressions to identify an extensive set of specific belief composites this can be used in the prediction of direct measures of TPB and the intention to participate in FTS.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide useful information to takaful marketers on how to develop marketing strategies to increase FTS participation. This study suggests that informative and persuasive promotions can be used to improve the penetration rate of FTSs in the UAE.

Originality/value

This study provides insights into previously unaddressed FTS participation in the UAE. Prior work on determining FTS participation has not been applied to both direct and indirect measures of TPB to understand the phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Maizaitulaidawati Md Husin and Razali Haron

This paper aims to attempt to first examine the competitiveness of micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) in the logistics industry; second, to identify the…

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2076

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to attempt to first examine the competitiveness of micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) in the logistics industry; second, to identify the MSMEs’ perception towards takāful (Islamic insurance); third, to recognise the challenges in the adoption of takāful; and fourth, to suggest strategies to enhance the micro-takāful penetration rate.

Design/methodology/approach

The SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was used to measure the MSMEs’ competitiveness. Interview sessions were conducted with 13 owners of MSMEs in the logistics industry from the period November 2018 until January 2019 in Selangor, Malaysia.

Findings

The SWOT analysis identified several strengths (e.g. advanced infrastructure, rising number of new entrants and contribution to the local economy), weaknesses (e.g. lack of digital culture and training and a dearth of expertise), opportunities (e.g. supportive government initiatives and evolution of the mobile internet) and threats (e.g. changing customer expectations and limited financing facilities). The MSMEs’ perception towards micro-takāful and challenges in the adoption of takāful were also identified.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides an understanding of the MSMEs’ perception towards micro- takāful products, sheds light on the challenges faced by MSME owners in protecting their businesses from risk exposures and offers strategies to enhance the micro- takāful penetration rate. This study, however, is limited to Malaysia’s experience.

Practical implications

The identification of MSMEs’ SWOT will be useful for these businesses as it provides solid information that can be used to improve business performance while also seeking takāful protection. This paper, other than serving as a guideline for stakeholders in the logistics industry to have a better understanding of their business environment, may also provide useful insights to practitioners and policymakers.

Originality/value

This paper integrates the SWOT analysis into a study on business risk exposure and takāful protection from the MSMEs’ perspective. Hence, the findings could broaden available knowledge on MSMEs, especially for businesses in the logistics industry. The knowledge may also facilitate matters for takāful operators interested in tapping into the market.

Details

ISRA International Journal of Islamic Finance, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0128-1976

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Maizaitulaidawati Md Husin and Razali Haron

This paper aims to provide a systematic review of literature on the demand for takāful (Islamic insurance) from articles published from January 2009 to June 2019. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a systematic review of literature on the demand for takāful (Islamic insurance) from articles published from January 2009 to June 2019. The review aims to synthesise and segment previously published research to identify the gaps and provide future research direction.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the literature was conducted. Past research was analysed, and content comparisons based on research focus, context and methodology were evaluated.

Findings

It was found that not much has been written and published on takāful demand in quality journals. The first two articles were published in 2009, but it was only in 2017 that coverage of the topic rapidly expanded. Although no article was found to have been published in 2018 on takāful demand, there was one published article on the topic in 2019. This paper also found that not much attention has been given to takāful demand from the corporate sector.

Research limitations/implications

The defined rule for document searching and selection excluded out-of-scope documents that might be relevant. Furthermore, as this paper concentrates exclusively on articles published in English journals, the possibility that other relevant works do appear elsewhere in a different language is not denied.

Practical implications

Factors determining takāful demand are provided, and general directions are discussed, which managers can use to develop market share further.

Originality/value

Such an extensive review of literature on takāful demand has not been done before. Other than revealing ambiguities, gaps and contradictions in the literature, this paper sketches an avenue for further research. It also provides information and guidance for other researchers wishing to embark on research on takāful demand.

Details

ISRA International Journal of Islamic Finance, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0128-1976

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Maizaitulaidawati Md Husin and Asmak Ab Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that influence an individual’s intention to participate in the family takaful scheme based on decomposed theory of…

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2392

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that influence an individual’s intention to participate in the family takaful scheme based on decomposed theory of planned behaviour (DTPB). The central hypotheses for this study are that individual’s intentions to participate in family takaful scheme are a result of attitudes towards participation in family takaful scheme, subjective norms, and perceived behavioural control (PBC). Awareness and knowledge, as well as exposure and religiosity, are integrated into the model.

Design/methodology/approach

Using primary data collection method, 384 questionnaires were distributed to target respondents comprising of Muslims in Klang Valley, Malaysia. The data were analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and SmartPLS.

Findings

The DTPB model is effective in predicting individual’s intention to participate in family takaful scheme. Out of 15 hypotheses, 12 were found to be significant. Attitudes towards participation in family takaful scheme, PBC, knowledge, and exposure have significant influences on purchase intention. However, this study found the path from religiosity, awareness, and subjective norm to intention was insignificant.

Practical implications

The results of this study highlight the applicability of DTPB into takaful research and suggest marketing strategies for family takaful operators.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in its presentation of a model for factors that affect individual’s intention to participate in family takaful scheme.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Abstract

Subject area

Entrepreneurship, Marketing management, Consumer behaviour

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate students, taking courses of entrepreneurship, marketing management and/or consumer behaviour that cover the topics related to entrepreneurial challenges, institutional support, growth strategy, market segmentation and marketing promotion strategy.

Case overview

This case demonstrates the dilemma of a founder, cum entrepreneur dealing with the issue related to a change in operating days that would affect her business profitability in the kindergarten industry. The case begins with the problem faced by Azizah Ayob, the founder and entrepreneur of Taska Kyrana when she hears that the state minister of Johor has announced that business operation days will be changed from Sunday to Friday with effect from 1 January 2014. The change would be applicable to government institutions in the state. However, businesses and corporations in the private sector can choose to continue observing Saturday-Sunday weekends or switch to the new official rest days of Friday-Saturday. As customers of Taska Kyrana consist of parents working in public and private sectors, as well as Singaporean parents, Ayob needs to choose either to follow the state requirement or to maintain the usual operation days.

Expected learning outcomes

Using this case, the students should be able to understand the need for institutional support for an entrepreneur; understand a possible growth strategy to cope with the volatile situation; understand the importance of a proper segmentation strategy to target the right group of customers; and understand the importance of a promotional strategy to attract new customers and to retain the existing one in a volatile situation.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Razali Haron, Naji Mansour Nomran, Anwar Hasan Abdullah Othman, Maizaitulaidawati Md Husin and Ashurov Sharofiddin

This study aims to evaluate the impact of firm, industry level determinants and ownership concentration on the dynamic capital structure decision in Indonesia and analyses…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the impact of firm, industry level determinants and ownership concentration on the dynamic capital structure decision in Indonesia and analyses the governing theories.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the dynamic panel model of generalized method of moments-System (one-step and two-step) by using a panel data from 2000 to 2014 to examine the relationship between the determinants and leverage. The results are robust to the various definitions of leverage, heterogeneity, autocorrelation, multicollinearity and endogeneity concern.

Findings

Growing firms and firms operating in a highly concentrated industry use high level of debt, taking advantage of the tax shield (trade-off theory). However, if the firms are operating in a highly dynamic environment, they take on less debt as to avoid bankruptcy risk. Firms in Indonesia opt for debt financing perhaps to act as a controlling mechanism to mitigate agency conflicts that may exist between the large controlling shareholders and the minority. Aged and highly profitable firms with high tangible and intangible assets and liquidity level operating in a high dynamic environment follow the pecking order theory.

Research limitations/implications

This study does not perform each industry regression individually. All the industries are pooled together, as the main focus of this study is to examine the factors affecting leverage of firms in general without giving particular attention to individual industry.

Originality/value

The insights on the impact of ownership concentration and industry characteristics are novel especially on Indonesia, thus fill the gap in the literature.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Shahab Aziz, Maizaitulaidawati Md Husin, Nazimah Hussin and Zahra Afaq

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that affect one’s attitude and intentions towards family takaful schemes, apart from evaluating the mediating role…

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1907

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that affect one’s attitude and intentions towards family takaful schemes, apart from evaluating the mediating role of perceived trust in the relationship between perceived religiosity and attitude towards family takaful. Most prior studies have considered religiosity as an individual’s tendency to be religious. However, the present study employed perceived religiosity as one’s perception regarding shariah compliance practices of family takaful schemes. Moreover, this study examines the direct relationship between perceived religiosity and attitude and the indirect relationship between perceived religiosity and trust.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 224 salaried individuals was selected with an age range of 24–50. Variance-based partial least squares structural equation modelling was employed for data analysis.

Findings

The results showed that knowledge and perceived usefulness (PU) had significantly positive relationships with attitude towards family takaful schemes. Perceived trust completely mediated the relationship between perceived religiosity and attitude towards family takaful. Attitude was positively related to purchase intention regarding family takaful.

Practical implications

The findings of the study are important for Islamic financial institutions, especially for takaful companies to revamp their marketing strategies. With enhanced understanding regarding consumer behaviour, takaful companies can sell their products in a more effective manner to increase their market share.

Originality/value

Behavioural aspects regarding the purchase of Islamic insurance products have yet to be profoundly explored in the literature. The indirect relationship between perceived religiosity and trust is established in this study. The study contributes to the field of consumer behaviour and marketing of Islamic financial products.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Majda Ayoub Juma Alzadjal, Mohd Fauzi Abu-Hussin, Maizaitulaidawati Md Husin and Mohd Yahya Mohd Hussin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the direct effect of classical predictors of an individual’s behaviour, namely, attitude, subjective norms (SN) and perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the direct effect of classical predictors of an individual’s behaviour, namely, attitude, subjective norms (SN) and perceived behavioural control (PBC) on the intention to deal with Islamic banks. The study extended the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) by introducing the customers’ religiosity paradigm as a moderator between the classical predictors of the theory and the intention to deal with Islamic banks.

Design/methodology/approach

By applying the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) framework, data were collected from conventional banks to investigate the potential Islamic bank customers’ intention. Using self-administered questionnaires, the data were collected from conventional banks in Muscat. A total of 1,000 questionnaires were distributed; however, only 638 were found usable. The structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to test the hypothesis and analyse the prediction values of the model in the TPB framework. It is also used to analyse the moderation effect of religiosity on the relation between the predictors and intention.

Findings

The results of the SEM analysis indicated that attitude, SN and PBC significantly predicted the potential customers’ intention to deal with Islamic banks in Oman. The results of the moderation effect shown that religiosity was a poor moderator of the relation between the attitude and intention as well as the PBC and intention, though, the result shown that religiosity is a partial moderator of the relation between the SN and intention.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the current study method, the result findings should be generalised with caution. Future studies may introduce other variables to examine the moderation effect between the relation of the predictor and intention of the TPB framework. It also signifies the moderation effect of religiosity on the relationship between the attitude, SN and PBC and intention of the potential customs in the TPB framework. This is considered a theoretical enrichment to the behaviour studies and TPB literature.

Practical implications

The current study assists the Islamic bank practitioners and regulators to broaden the horizon in considering the practical outcomes from the academic research. The result from this study does not only prove that the TPB seems to be acceptable in explaining the intention and behaviour in the field of Islamic banking but also support the robustness of the ability of TPB in predicting the behaviour and intention in a different research context (Islamic banking and finance).

Originality/value

This study is an attempt to introduce religiosity as a moderator in the TPB framework with SEM analysis and to explore the moderation effect between the predictors and intention to deal with Islamic banks among Omani’s Islamic Bank Customers. This study endeavours to fill a gap of these moderation effects and how the customers’ religiosity influence customer’s preferences towards Islamic Bank.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Abdoulaye N’Guilla Sow, Rohaida Basiruddin, Siti Zaleha Abdul Rasid and Maizaitulaidawati Md Husin

The paper aims to provide an overview of fraud risk among Malaysian small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In particular, the authors investigate the understanding of…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to provide an overview of fraud risk among Malaysian small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In particular, the authors investigate the understanding of SME owners and managers on fraud schemes and the usage of antifraud measures.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 126 Malaysian SMEs from different industries participated in this study.

Findings

The results suggest that Malaysian SMEs are exposed to a broad range of fraud schemes, yet few take actions to prevent these frauds.

Practical implications

The findings should be useful to academic researchers, entrepreneurs, regulators and others who are interested in understanding the fraud risk in small businesses.

Originality/value

This study extends and contributes to prior literature by linking the state of fraud and SMEs in developing countries.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Hummera Saleem, Malik Shahzad Shabbir, Bilal Khan, Shahab Aziz, Maizaitulaidawati Md Husin and Bilal Ahmed Abbasi

This empirical analysis tries to examine determinants of private foreign direct investment (FDI) in Pakistan using the bounds test approach. Main determinants of FDI among…

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical analysis tries to examine determinants of private foreign direct investment (FDI) in Pakistan using the bounds test approach. Main determinants of FDI among them are the size of the market (Q) macroeconomic stability (r), political stability (PRS), real exchange rate (REX) and institutional quality (INQ).

Design/methodology/approach

This study used annual time-series data set starting from 1980 to 2016. This study has used time-series data with ARDL and error-correction model (ECM) and examined main determinants of FDI for Pakistan. The study used the Granger causality test (modified WALD test) to identify the causality among the variables.

Findings

Moreover, empirical findings indicate the long-run relationship between GDP, trade openness and institutional quality toward FDI. However, political instability, inflation and real exchange rate harm FDI in Pakistan. Furthermore, results of Granger causality indicate that the bidirectional causality running from FDI and Q toward FDI is significant, providing evidence of FDI-led growth hypotheses in Pakistan. This study determines the correlation between FDI and Q (GDP growth) related to the “feedback hypothesis” in the short and long run. This study also concludes that the short-run causal connection among FDI, REX, PRS, r and Q follows the “feedback hypothesis.” This describes that FDI, REX, PRS, r and Q variables are jointly determined and affected together.

Originality/value

This study also explores the causal association between FDI and its significant determinants, by using methods of Granger causality test and the approach of Toda-Yamamoto-DoladoLutkephol (TYDL) to examine the causal relationship and its directions among these variables.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

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