Search results

1 – 10 of over 54000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Johan Hendrik van Mossel and Ad Straub

This paper aims to provide a systematic connection between the special institutional environment of the Dutch social housing sector, public tasks for the social housing…

Downloads
1237

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a systematic connection between the special institutional environment of the Dutch social housing sector, public tasks for the social housing sector, the organisational goals of housing associations, and their procurement strategy for technical management services.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on expert interviews, expert meetings and a literature review, a conceptual model is created that helps focusing the procurement of technical management services.

Findings

For social enterprises such as housing associations, just as all for‐profit enterprises, the determination of strategic organisational directions is essential for success. The literature review revealed few possible strategic focal points for housing associations: financial performances and social performances. The procurement of technical management can contribute shaping these performances. Making the right choices in the supplier selection, based on the strategic focal direction of housing associations, enables housing associations to improve organisational effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The research is directed towards the organisational goals of housing associations, while the procurement strategy of housing associations should also be based on the characteristics of the different items that are procured. Further detailed research is needed to decide on appropriate procurement strategies for different products and services purchased by housing associations.

Practical implications

Procurement strategy and in particular supplier selection and specification choices can be adapted to the specific situation of social enterprises, such as housing associations, and be connected to the strategic directions of the individual organisation.

Originality/value

This paper aims at narrowing this knowledge gap, for academics, purchasers and housing associations' general managers.

Details

Property Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Sadi Assaf, Mohammad A. Hassanain, Abdul‐Mohsen Al‐Hammad and Ahmed Al‐Nehmi

The objectives of this paper are to identify the critical factors that influence the decision to outsource maintenance services in public Saudi Arabian universities, and…

Downloads
3760

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this paper are to identify the critical factors that influence the decision to outsource maintenance services in public Saudi Arabian universities, and to investigate the relative importance of each of the identified factors based on the expressed opinions of the in‐house maintenance managers in the concerned maintenance departments in these universities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a comprehensive review of the literature in the fields of maintenance management and outsourcing practices to achieve a thorough understanding of the issues involved, and identifying the crucial factors affecting the outsourcing decision of maintenance services. A questionnaire survey was developed to assess each factor influencing the decision to outsource maintenance services in the public Saudi Arabian universities. The survey included 38 factors grouped in six major groups. The respondents who have opted to outsource several of their maintenance services to specialty contractors were asked to indicate their perceived level of importance for each of the identified factors. The level of importance of the factors and the groups were measured. The factor groups were ranked according to the obtained mean rating values.

Findings

The findings show that Saudi universities generally value the importance of the quality, management and strategic factors when making outsourcing decisions. The most important three factors influencing the decision to outsource maintenance services in the public Saudi Arabia universities were identified as “increase the speed of implementation”, “improve quality requirements” and “risk sharing with contractors”.

Practical implications

The findings of the study provide practical value for facilities maintenance managers in institutions of higher education confronted with the decision of whether to outsource maintenance services in their campuses.

Originality/value

The paper is original in the sense that it identifies how in‐house maintenance managers rate the importance of the factors influencing outsourcing decisions.

Details

Property Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Henk‐Jan van Mossel and Sylvia J.T. Jansen

Knowing which services are essential to tenants gives the housing associations the background to set priorities in maintenance policy and purchasing. The purpose of this…

Downloads
1986

Abstract

Purpose

Knowing which services are essential to tenants gives the housing associations the background to set priorities in maintenance policy and purchasing. The purpose of this paper is to explore residents' perceived importance of various maintenance services.

Design/methodology/approach

The research question is explored through a large‐scale survey of more than 6,000 tenants of Dutch housing associations. Priorities were studied in three different ways: respondents were asked to provide direct importance ratings, importance weights were derived from regression analyses, and, an importance‐performance analysis (IPA) was performed.

Findings

The results with regard to the priorities differ somewhat according to which method is used. However, the methods agree in that maintenance of heating and water systems and maintenance of hinges and locks of windows and external doors should get priority. If the goal is to increase customer satisfaction, the maintenance of exterior paintwork and bathrooms should also get appropriate attention. According to the IPA, the maintenance of ventilation systems should be taken good care of.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of the study is that residents have provided their preferences in maintenance service delivery without noticing the costs that are included with the several options. Furthermore, the priorities between service aspects, i.e. the aspects that determine the service quality of the maintenance service delivery were not measured.

Practical implications

This paper provides insight into resident's priorities with regard to maintenance services. This can be of use for companies, such as housing associations. Furthermore, it contributes to scientific knowledge with regard to the impact of different measurement methods.

Originality/value

Different applied methods for measuring priorities lead to different results. Both practitioners and researchers should take this into account when measuring priorities. The goal of the research should determine the choice of which method to use.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

A. (Ad) Straub

The purpose of this paper is to show how performance‐based contracting functions as an enabler of service innovation by maintenance contractors.

Downloads
1109

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how performance‐based contracting functions as an enabler of service innovation by maintenance contractors.

Design/methodology/approach

A postal survey of medium‐sized maintenance employers was carried out. The questionnaire and findings were mapped and analysed combining existing models of service innovation and service quality.

Findings

As a consequence of the survey, performance‐based contracting maintenance companies implement innovations in their service concept, client interface and service delivery system to guarantee the quality of their services. The maintenance contractors have launched new, improved or better competing services for their own organisation. Existing services are implemented in a new environment incorporating small incremental innovations.

Research limitations/implications

Maintenance companies do not solely address all business innovations as consequences of performance‐based contracting. Performance‐based contracting of, for example, building services may by the different nature of the maintenance strategies and activities lead to somewhat other outcomes.

Originality/value

There is very little literature on maintenance contractors as service providers and service innovators. This paper provides insights in innovations by maintenance contractors as well as the needed additional knowledge and competences of the contractors acting as maintenance‐engineering consultants.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property…

Downloads
25614

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Downloads
15612

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Downloads
22363

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Property Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property…

Downloads
13743

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Downloads
13199

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Property Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Mal Kong Sia, Vivien Wong Chin Yew, Zhi Yong Lim and Ye Dongqing

It is essential to provide the necessary facilities in a building for human living. However, most unit owners of high-rise buildings do not realise the importance of good…

Downloads
1000

Abstract

Purpose

It is essential to provide the necessary facilities in a building for human living. However, most unit owners of high-rise buildings do not realise the importance of good property management until their buildings and common facilities have deteriorated. It is thus important to ensure adequate maintenance is provided to create and sustain a healthy living environment for high-rise households. The purpose of this study is to measure and compare the perceptions and satisfactions of residents with the facilities and maintenance services provided in two different condominiums located next to each other.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey questionnaires were used, and the data were collected from 120 residents of each condominium which was developed by the same developer but completed at different times. Using the IBM SPSS Statistics software, cross tabulations, χ2 tests of independence and independent-samples t-tests were carried out for descriptive and inferential statistics. A simple post questionnaire survey was conducted to confirm the findings obtained from χ2 tests and t-tests.

Findings

The results show that residents’ perceptions of facilities and maintenance services provided are significantly higher for the newer condominium compared to the older one. Residents’ satisfactions with facilities are also higher for the newer condominium. However, poorer lift services and their maintenance have resulted in lower overall mean satisfaction with maintenance services for the newer condominium. Nevertheless, results from data collected in post questionnaire survey reveal that the respondents still prefer to live in the newer condominium despite higher rental rates.

Research limitations/implications

This paper reports only the data collected from samples of two condominiums in Kuala Lumpur.

Practical implications

There is a dearth of literature on residents’ perceptions and satisfactions towards facilities and maintenance services provided for high-rise residential living, particularly in Malaysia, where high-rise buildings are either managed by joint management body or management corporation depending on whether the strata titles have been issued. The findings can be used as benchmarks for property management purposes of condominiums.

Originality/value

This paper could be considered as the first in reporting residents’ perceptions and satisfactions with the facilities and maintenance services provided in residential high-rise buildings since the implementation of the Strata Management Act 2013, which was implemented to provide for proper maintenance and management of high-rise buildings and the common properties.

Details

Facilities, vol. 36 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 54000