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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

S. Tamer Cavusgil and Lisa A. Elvey‐Kirk

In addition to proposing an integrated conceptualization of mail survey response behavior, this article presents an empirical study which examines the potential of source…

3761

Abstract

In addition to proposing an integrated conceptualization of mail survey response behavior, this article presents an empirical study which examines the potential of source and appeal variations on response rate, response speed, and response completeness. The findings of this empirical study are presented and compared to a similar study for the purpose of validating source and appeal effects on mail survey response and the conceptual framework. The results, not totally in agreement with earlier findings, generally lend support for the untapped potential of source and appeal in influencing mail survey response behavior. There is also statistical justification for two of the six motivators comprising the proposed conceptual framework.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 32 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Ashok Ranchhod and Fan Zhou

The utilization of the Internet and Internet marketing for marketing research has received considerable attention. Although there is a growing body of research devoted to…

3256

Abstract

The utilization of the Internet and Internet marketing for marketing research has received considerable attention. Although there is a growing body of research devoted to this issue little has been done to explore the impact of Internet technology, e‐mail users’ on‐line skills and experience, on their choice of the new survey medium. This study is based on a sample of 122 responses from UK marketing executives using e‐mail and mail questionnaire surveys respectively. The research instrument included measures of respondents’ extent of e‐mail use, their general knowledge of online communications and their time of using the Internet. Some significant impact of these factors has been identified. The empirical evidence supports the hypotheses that the use of e‐mail survey methods is positively connected with high technology awareness and extensive e‐mail use. The findings imply that proper survey planning and administration are important for Internet‐based marketing surveys and suggest the existence of certain user patterns among different Internet user populations.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Gurprit S. Kindra, K.L. McGown, Devinder Gandhi and Georges Benay

The degree of interest in the subject of a survey has no effect on response rates from samples of the general public, and short questionnaires yield substantially higher…

Abstract

The degree of interest in the subject of a survey has no effect on response rates from samples of the general public, and short questionnaires yield substantially higher response rates than lengthier ones. Two questionnaires of identical length but covering two different topics were used in a survey of 240 people drawn at random from a Montreal telephone directory; the results concluded that an offer of survey results to participants does not affect response rate significantly, but persistence alone represents the crucial factor in securing good returns.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Barrie Gunter, David Nicholas, Paul Huntington and Peter Williams

The growth of the Internet and other digital media has opened up exciting opportunities for the provision of public services, for business and for personal transactions…

5481

Abstract

The growth of the Internet and other digital media has opened up exciting opportunities for the provision of public services, for business and for personal transactions. Comparisons between the earliest forms of “online” research, in the form of telephone interviewing, and offline data collection via face‐to‐face interviews or self‐completion questionnaires, revealed that the modality within which research was conducted could affect research findings. In examining the evidence, this paper indicates that the use of online methodologies has important implications for sampling, response rates, quality of data produced, and operational practices in research projects. Online research is restricted to individuals with access to relevant technologies (e.g. the Internet) and where online technology penetration is limited, survey samples are unlikely to represent the general population. Online surveys, however, can produce quicker response rates than offline surveys and also richer open‐ended responses. The important point is to recognise the strengths and weaknesses are associated with different methodologies and what differences can exist between online and offline data collection procedures.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Leslie de Chernatony

There is an erroneously held view that postal surveys cannotachieve sufficient response rates to overcome non‐response bias and arebest suited when budgets are limited…

Abstract

There is an erroneously held view that postal surveys cannot achieve sufficient response rates to overcome non‐response bias and are best suited when budgets are limited. This article reviews the increasing number of published studies which show that, with planning, high response rates can be achieved. It reports on a survey of members of the Postal Research Special Interest Group (formed under the auspices of the Market Research Society). Current postal research practice is highlighted and inferences drawn about the mechanics associated with high response rates.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

David Jobber and Daragh O’Reilly

A literature review of techniques for raising response rates to industrial mail surveys identified six tried and tested methods. Experimental evidence shows considerable…

934

Abstract

A literature review of techniques for raising response rates to industrial mail surveys identified six tried and tested methods. Experimental evidence shows considerable support for a prior telephone call, pre‐paid monetary incentives, non‐monetary gifts (such as a pen), using stamps on return envelopes, granting anonymity to respondents and following up the initial mailing with a second covering letter and questionnaire. Gives indications of the likely rise in response rates. By examining the available evidence, users of industrial mail surveys can decide more confidently on their research strategy.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Erica Amari, Christine Vandebeek, Carolyne J. Montgomery, Erik Skarsgard and J. Mark Ansermino

Patient questionnaires are popular tools for assessing and improving service quality, especially as administrators are increasingly expected to consider the patient's…

819

Abstract

Purpose

Patient questionnaires are popular tools for assessing and improving service quality, especially as administrators are increasingly expected to consider the patient's voice in their decision making. Despite web‐based questionnaire advantages, they have not been previously compared to telephone questionnaires for assessing quality. The purpose of this paper is to compare telephone questionnaire administration with a web‐based version.

Design/methodology/approach

Day surgery patients from a tertiary pediatric hospital completed a telephone interview and a web‐based questionnaire with identical questions. The appropriateness of the web version as a telephone version substitute was ascertained by comparing the number of changes in responses, non‐responses, differences in means, the number of non‐substantive responses and reliability.

Findings

The web‐based questionnaire tended towards more negative responses. The mean number of missing responses did not differ between versions, although the web‐questionnaire had more “not sure” responses. Inter‐rater reliability was acceptable.

Research limitations/implications

Parents without internet access were unable to participate.

Practical implications

The web‐based questionnaire is a good substitute for telephone‐administered questionnaires.

Originality/value

The paper shows that parents were able to rate items more candidly owing to the increase in privacy and lack of interviewer bias, which is crucial for improving health service quality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Nicolaos E. Synodinos

This article reviews research findings related to the “art” of constructing survey questionnaires. It discusses some of the important issues that should be considered in…

9644

Abstract

This article reviews research findings related to the “art” of constructing survey questionnaires. It discusses some of the important issues that should be considered in gathering quality data via questionnaires, provides general suggestions for their construction, includes a comprehensive list of important reference sources, and examines some of the survey‐based studies published in Integrated Manufacturing Systems. Constructing a good questionnaire requires a thorough grasp of the intricacies of the topical area and detailed knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the different survey administration modes. In addition, questionnaire construction entails close attention to details about the wording of questions, their instructions, their response choices, and their sequence. Most importantly, the research instrument should be refined based on guidance from repeated pretests. Well‐constructed questionnaires can ensure the consistent meaning of the questions across respondents and can contribute to data quality by decreasing both item and unit nonresponse.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Eusebio Scornavacca, Joao Luiz Becker and Stuart J. Barnes

The application of the Internet to traditional business and administrative activities has introduced considerable digitisation and process automation. One key area of…

3878

Abstract

The application of the Internet to traditional business and administrative activities has introduced considerable digitisation and process automation. One key area of development from a research perspective is the use of electronic (e‐)surveys, based on Internet technology. E‐surveys can bring many benefits from a research perspective, including extremely low marginal costs, automation of processes, and the ability to collect and manage very large samples. However, experience in the use of e‐surveys has found considerable challenges in achieving a quality sample frame and response rates. This paper explores the development of an e‐survey tool for assessing information needs of growth enterprises in Brazil. A key learning from the use of the survey is the use of control methods for both improving the response rate, and, as a consequence, the sample frame.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 104 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

A.J. Faria and John R. Dickinson

The promise of a charitable contribution on behalf of respondents to mail surveys may prove effective in increasing response rates as well as offering cost and…

Abstract

The promise of a charitable contribution on behalf of respondents to mail surveys may prove effective in increasing response rates as well as offering cost and administration advantages. This study refines this type of incentive by investigating the effect of the amount of the charitable contribution and the placement of the incentive offer in the cover letter. The research population is drawn from the industrial sector, an important sector which has been studied far less than consumers.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 18 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

1 – 10 of over 26000