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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Susanne Imhof and Maike Andresen

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the specific relationship between temporary agency workers (TAWs) and their employing temporary work agencies in Germany that is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the specific relationship between temporary agency workers (TAWs) and their employing temporary work agencies in Germany that is characterized – in contrast to other European countries – by agencies’ central role in employment and the prevalence of permanent contracts. The study addresses a research gap in understanding the mediating role of perceived organizational support (POS) provided by temporary work agencies in the relationship between employment-specific antecedents and TAWs’ subjective well-being (SWB).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 350 TAWs in Germany, the mediating role of POS provided by agencies is analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The authors show that procedural justice, performance feedback and social network availability positively relate to POS while perceived job insecurity shows the expected negative influence and distributive justice has no impact on POS. POS, in turn, positively relates to SWB. The partially mediating effect of POS between employment-specific antecedents and SWB is also confirmed.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on cross-sectional data and self-reported measures; this may limit causal inferences.

Practical implications

The results highlight the importance of agencies creating POS and reducing perceived job insecurity for improving TAWs’ SWB.

Originality/value

The study contributes to previous POS research by focusing on the agencies’ role and by showing the mediating effect of POS on TAWs’ SWB in Germany.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2019

Birgit Muskat, Leonie Lockstone-Binney, Faith Ong and Maike Andresen

The purpose of this paper is to develop an integrative conceptual framework of the “talented hospitality entrepreneur”. In doing so, the authors address the current lack…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an integrative conceptual framework of the “talented hospitality entrepreneur”. In doing so, the authors address the current lack of understanding of talent at the individual entrepreneurial level and the lack of integration between the talent and entrepreneurship literatures and specifically consider the hospitality context.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper systematically synthesizes the extant literature and links key concepts within talent management, entrepreneurship, hospitality and human resource management to develop a model of the talented hospitality entrepreneur.

Findings

Seven propositions emerge from the literature synthesis, and the integrative conceptual model is developed to define the individual antecedents of the talented hospitality entrepreneur and their outcomes for success.

Originality/value

To date, understanding of the individual level of talent has been neglected in the management literature. The quandary is that the extant literature on talent has focused on the management of talent at an organizational level, while the entrepreneurship literature has concentrated on spatial macro-level effects. Further, the notion of talent in hospitality literature remains underexplored. Adopting an inclusive view of talent, the authors offer a new integrative framework explaining the constituencies of talent for hospitality entrepreneurs and an associated research agenda.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Maike Andresen and Bianka Lichtenberger

The paper seeks first to present an overview of the corporate university landscape in Germany contrasting it with the US‐American corporate university market and, second…

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1655

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks first to present an overview of the corporate university landscape in Germany contrasting it with the US‐American corporate university market and, second, to outline the development in Germany during the last 15 years and to have a look at future trends such as learning alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

The comparison in the paper is based on empirical data of the largest corporate universities in the USA and Germany gathered by interviews with the heads of the institutions and by evaluations of data such as homepages, brochures, and presentations by the companies. In addition, reference is made to surveys and case studies published by other researchers.

Findings

The paper works out major differences between Germany and the USA regarding the educational level, target groups, strategic directions, partnerships, alliances with external vendors, accreditation, focus on internal versus external job market, and organisation that can be led back to the stronger strategic orientation of German corporate universities. It presents the business model of a learning alliance as a potential solution to the major challenges German corporate universities are facing.

Research limitations/implications

Research data being based on interviews and corporate data risk being biased due to marketing purposes. Future research should include internal observations and evaluations.

Practical implications

The paper gives an example for a learning alliance in practice that could be of relevance for a larger number of institutions.

Originality/value

The comparative study helps to understand the US‐American and German corporate university markets as well as their specificities and investigates future developments.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Maike Andresen

The purpose of this paper is to present knowledge as an important diversity dimension in globally operating companies and to illustrate how companies with corporate…

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4382

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present knowledge as an important diversity dimension in globally operating companies and to illustrate how companies with corporate universities (CUs) proceed in order to achieve knowledge inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is developed regarding the management of knowledge diversity methodologically based on the grounded theory approach and examples in existing CUs are given.

Findings

Different diversity learning approaches in corporate university programmes are explained and integrated in a model. The paper recognises the need to more actively manage knowledge diversity in companies.

Practical implications

The paper gives advice to companies on how to better manage their diversity of knowledge and knowledge bearers for strategic learning purposes. The paper is a first step in the academic discussion of knowledge as a diversity dimension.

Originality/value

Knowledge is defined as a diversity dimension by scientists but has not been discussed in depth so far. The paper distinguishes between knowledge diversity and inclusion and shows in which way companies can proceed in order to profit from the diversity in learning environments.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Maike Andresen

– The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine job embeddedness as antecedent of job performance and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) of expatriates.

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1658

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine job embeddedness as antecedent of job performance and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) of expatriates.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 194 expatriates from 39 nationalities were recruited through various expatriate organizations, which provided expatriate groups they had access to with a link to the online survey in English. To test the hypotheses, the author used bivariate analyses and multivariate regressions were calculated to control for alternative explanations.

Findings

As hypothesized, community embeddedness was positively related to job performance and both organizational embeddedness and community embeddedness were positively related to OCBs. Moreover, community embeddedness and organizational embeddedness showed to be positively related. In addition, organizational embeddedness partially mediated the positive relationship between community embeddedness and job performance for organizational expatriates (moderated mediation) as well as the positive relationship between community embeddedness and OCBs.

Originality/value

This is one of the first study to address the differential effects of organizational and community embeddedness on job performance in an expatriation context.

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Torsten Biemann and Maike Andresen

This paper aims to analyze the differences between assigned expatriates (AEs) and self‐initiated expatriates (SEs) in management and executive positions. The basic…

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8466

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the differences between assigned expatriates (AEs) and self‐initiated expatriates (SEs) in management and executive positions. The basic research question is how far SEs and AEs differ with respect to their reasons for working internationally and regarding their career aspirations and orientations, and in what way their individual career management differs.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 159 expatriate managers completed an online questionnaire in German. The questionnaire covered psychological constructs and the participating managers' career histories.

Findings

It is shown that SEs start their international careers at a younger age, have a higher organizational mobility, and expect higher benefits from international experiences for their future careers. Moreover, career orientation remains relatively stable in SEs over different age groups, whereas it declines for AEs with increasing age.

Research limitations/implications

The study design is cross‐sectional and based on self‐reports, which makes causal explanations of the results difficult and increases the risk of common method bias.

Practical implications

Specific personnel management requirements regarding SEs in contrast to AEs are pointed out especially in the fields of recruitment, retention and career management, which can help support companies in building up a pool of global managers.

Originality/value

The paper adds valuable new insights to the literature on expatriate work and gives further evidence that SEs form a group that has been overlooked for a long time, even though it differs significantly from traditional expatriates who are sent abroad by their employing companies to return some years later.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Maike Andresen and Jil Margenfeld

International relocation for work reasons implies uncertainty and stress, resulting in high expatriate failure rates. Hence, organizations should consider employee’s…

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1393

Abstract

Purpose

International relocation for work reasons implies uncertainty and stress, resulting in high expatriate failure rates. Hence, organizations should consider employee’s international relocation mobility readiness (IRMR) in selection processes. The purpose of this paper is to identify personal as well as social antecedents of IRMR.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered by an online survey (n=273 German employees) and analyzed using SEM.

Findings

SEM results indicate that attitudinal (boundaryless mindset), biographical (previous international work experience) and social variables (the perceived social endorsement of international relocation mobility) are positively related to IRMR. The positive relationship between personality variables (uncertainty tolerance, proactive personality) and IRMR is mediated by boundaryless mindset.

Research limitations/implications

The sampling method applied limits the generalization of the results.

Practical implications

Results can be applied in personnel selection to find employees with a strong IRMR. Thus, expatriate failure rates could be reduced.

Originality/value

This is the first study that addressed personal as well as social antecedents of IRMR.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2007

The paper aims to review the latest management development across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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1214

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to review the latest management development across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The paper finds that the first purpose of corporate universities is not education. Corporate universities build up specific knowledge relevant to the business. They create a workforce that suits the corporate strategy of the company. In a globalizing environment superior skills can bring sustainable competitive advantage. The development of corporate universities has been a direct consequence of increasingly strategic human resources. They offer a flexible concept that can adapt to the nature of the organization's business environment, react to market changes and competitive pressure.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Jan Selmer

Downloads
207

Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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