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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Vijay K. Bansal and Mahesh Pal

The applications of geographic information systems (GIS) are described in the civil engineering literature for generation, visualisation and evaluation of the construction…

Abstract

Purpose

The applications of geographic information systems (GIS) are described in the civil engineering literature for generation, visualisation and evaluation of the construction schedule. GIS use is also explored for construction quantity takeoffs and cost estimation. The purpose of this paper is to supplement the already explored capabilities of GIS in construction by providing the methodology for direct sunlight visualisation on buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed methodology for direct sunlight visualisation is to calculate the solar angles and use them for spatial distribution representation of the amount of sunlight received on different faces of a building by rendering it with the colour of varied gradients. The colour gradient on any face of a building depends upon the amount of direct sunlight received. The solar gain is demonstrated through the multi‐dimensional data visualisation like sun angle variations with diurnal and annual cycles in a navigable 3D animation.

Findings

GIS‐based methodology provides the planner a way to control the natural lighting and solar gain on a building which can be combined with the project schedule, quantity takeoffs, cost estimate and 4D visualisation in a single environment. Beginning with this idea, the planner may store and share information about a construction project, site and surrounding geography.

Originality/value

Most of the existing 4D CAD technologies do not have project management capabilities and are used mainly for the planning and design stage of a construction project. In comparison, GIS‐based tools may be used in different stages. These are more management‐based and allow more collaborative and cooperative relationships between designer, constructor and client. By using a GIS‐based approach, construction documents like schedules, drawings, quantity takeoffs, cost estimates, project specifications and direct sunlight visualisations are more consistent with each other.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Mahesh Joshi, Daryll Cahill, Jasvinder Sidhu and Monika Kansal

The purpose of this paper is to examine the intellectual capital (IC) performance of the Australian Financial Sector for the period 2006‐2008. It also aims to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the intellectual capital (IC) performance of the Australian Financial Sector for the period 2006‐2008. It also aims to examine the relationship between IC performance and the financial performance of the financial sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The value added intellectual coefficient (VAIC) approach developed by Pulic is used to determine the IC performance of the Australian financial sector. The required data to calculate different constituents of IC was obtained from the annual reports of Australian Financial Sector companies.

Findings

The value creation capability of financial sector in Australia is highly influenced by human capital. About two thirds of the sample companies have very low levels of intellectual capital efficiency. The performance of various components of VAIC and overall VAIC differs across all subsectors in the financial sector. Investment companies have high value VAIC due to higher a level of human capital efficiency, as compared to banks, insurance companies, diversified financials and RIETs. Insurance companies are more focussed on physical capital rather than human and structural capital leading to lower VAIC.

Research limitations/implications

The paper analyses IC performance of only one sector of the Australian economy and there is a relatively narrow three‐year period for the data collection. However, a comparative analysis of various sub sectors in the Australian financial sector justifies the contributions made by this study.

Practical implications

The findings may serve as a useful input for financial institutions to apply knowledge management in their institutions and in addressing the factors affecting IC performance in order to maximise their value creation. It will also help the management of companies in other sectors, especially those in knowledge‐based industries, in understanding the contributions of various components of intellectual capital in their growth.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that examines the relationship of intellectual capital performance with financial performance of financial sector companies in Australia.

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Jacqueline Birt, Mahesh Joshi and Michael Kend

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the value relevance of segment information for both public and private sector banks in India. In doing so, this paper examines…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the value relevance of segment information for both public and private sector banks in India. In doing so, this paper examines a rapidly developing economy and perhaps its most critical sector during this period of strong economic growth.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study uses the simplified Ohlson model, for a sample of 136 private sector and public sector banks for the period 2007-2010 in India.

Findings

The paper finds that public sector banks have higher share prices, higher earnings and more equity compared with private sector banks. Segment earnings data is highly value relevant for both sectors; however, segment equity data is only marginally value relevant for Indian banks. The number of segments is also value relevant and associated with higher share prices.

Originality/value

The results of this study contribute additional evidence to the literature on segment reporting by studying the effect of adoption of segment reporting in an emerging market. Findings from the paper are particularly relevant as India is currently in the process of changing its segment reporting requirements and moving to an IFRS-based segment standard.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Varinder Pal Singh Sidhu, Khushdeep Goyal and Rakesh Goyal

This paper aims to use the high-velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) spraying process for depositing 93(WC–Cr3C2)–7Ni, 75Cr3C2–25NiCr, 83WC–17CO and 86WC–10CO–4Cr coatings on ASME…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use the high-velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) spraying process for depositing 93(WC–Cr3C2)–7Ni, 75Cr3C2–25NiCr, 83WC–17CO and 86WC–10CO–4Cr coatings on ASME SA213 T91 to study the corrosion resistance of these coatings in an actual boiler environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The HVOF spraying process was used for depositing 93(WC–Cr3C2)–7Ni, 75Cr3C2–25NiCr, 83WC–17CO and 86WC–10CO–4Cr coatings on ASME SA213 T91. All the coatings obtained are found to be uniform, dense and having thickness between 200 and 250 μm. All the coatings were exposed in an actual boiler environment at 900°C temperature for 10 cycles. Each cycle consisted of 100 h heating followed by 1 h cooling at ambient conditions. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy techniques were used to analyse corrosion products.

Findings

All the coated samples were found to be having higher corrosion resistance than the uncoated samples. Among coated specimens, 93(WC–Cr3C2)–7Ni coating has shown maximum and 75Cr3C2–25NiCr coating has shown minimum resistance to corrosion.

Originality/value

This paper is original research.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 64 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Sukhdev Singh, Jasvinder Sidhu, Mahesh Joshi and Monika Kansal

The purpose of this paper is to measure the intellectual capital performance of Indian banks and established a relationship between intellectual capital and return on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure the intellectual capital performance of Indian banks and established a relationship between intellectual capital and return on assets (ROA). The paper also compared the intellectual capital performance of public sector and private sector banks.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on secondary data from the top 20 Indian banks. Ten banks were selected from each of the public and private sectors on the basis of paid-up equity capital. The analysis was made using the value added intellectual coefficient, the coefficient of variation, exponential growth rates, trend analysis, Yule’s coefficient, the coefficient of correlation, the F-test and the t-test.

Findings

The study revealed that private sectors have performed relatively better regarding the creation of total information coefficient (IC). However, the ROA was still below the international benchmark of > 1 percent. The major cause of the lower IC and the reduced ROA is disproportionate to the increase in capital employed and escalating non-performing assets in the Indian banking sector.

Practical implications

The study focussed on managers and identified the causes of lower performance. It proposed numerous strategies to improve the aggregate score of IC, which is closely related to bank profitability.

Originality/value

This is the first study to make a comparative analysis of intellectual capital performance in public and private sector banks in India and in addition to the traditional style of measuring sectoral performance. Further, the study employed new statistical tools, such as Yule’s coefficient of association, to establish the association between performance variables.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

M.P. Satija and Sukhdev Singh

Reports briefly on the Technical Sessions and other presentations of the 43rd All‐India Conference of the Indian Library Association, and mentions the recommendations made…

Abstract

Reports briefly on the Technical Sessions and other presentations of the 43rd All‐India Conference of the Indian Library Association, and mentions the recommendations made by delegates at the conclusion of the conference.

Details

Asian Libraries, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1017-6748

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Paul W. Cleary, Raymond C.Z. Cohen, Simon M. Harrison, Matthew D. Sinnott, Mahesh Prakash and Stuart Mead

The purpose of this paper is to show how simulation of the flow of particulates and fluids using discrete element modelling (DEM) and smoothed particle dynamics (SPH…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how simulation of the flow of particulates and fluids using discrete element modelling (DEM) and smoothed particle dynamics (SPH) particle methods, offer opportunities for better understanding the dynamics of flow processes.

Design/methodology/approach

DEM and SPH methods are demonstrated in a broad range of computationally‐demanding applications including comminution, biomedical, geophysical extreme flow events (risk/disaster modelling), eating of food by humans and elite water‐based sports.

Findings

DEM is ideally suited to predicting industrial and geophysical applications where collisions between particles are the dominant physics. SPH is highly suited to multi‐physics fluid flow applications in industrial, biophysical and geophysical applications. The advantages and disadvantages of these particle methods are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Research results are limited by the numerical resolution that can currently be afforded.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates the use of particle‐based computational methods in a series of high value applications. Enterprises that share interests in these applications will benefit in their product and service development by adopting these methods.

Social implications

The ability to model disasters provides governments and companies with the opportunity and obligation to use these to render knowable disasters which were previously considered unknowable. The ability to predict the breakdown of food during eating opens up opportunities for the design of superior performing foods with lower salt, sugar and fat that can directly contribute to improved health outcomes and can influence government food regulatory policy.

Originality/value

The paper extends the scale and range of modelling of particle methods for demanding leading‐edge problems, of practical interest in engineering and applied sciences.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Nitin Arora, Nidhi Grover Arora and Kritika Kanwar

The issue of mounting non-performing assets (NPAs) in Indian banking industry is serious and attracting attention of academia and policy planners. Thus, the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The issue of mounting non-performing assets (NPAs) in Indian banking industry is serious and attracting attention of academia and policy planners. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis whether NPAs in Indian commercial banking have reached at alarming state where they start affecting the technical efficiency levels adversely or not.

Design/methodology/approach

The efficiency score have been computed using case model (model with NPAs as bad/undesirable output) vs control model (model without NPAs as bad/undesirable output) methodology under meta-frontier data envelopment analysis framework.

Findings

It has been noticed that the effect of NPAs on overall technical efficiency and its various components is insignificant. The comparison of the case models (i.e. model with NPAs as bad output) with the control models (i.e. model without NPAs) reveals insignificant difference in average efficiency scores and rank distribution of commercial banks. The major source of inefficiency is technology gap (i.e. structure, setup and objectives of banking) among public, domestic private and foreign private categories of banks.

Practical implications

Though NPAs are increasing in Indian banking industry and specifically in Indian public sector banks because of their compulsory lending to priority sector yet the banks have huge scope to extend credit to priority sector as the NPAs have not reached at alarming stage where they start affecting adversely the efficiency performance.

Originality/value

Given the fact that the banking penetrations, structure and objectives differ significantly across ownership, separate frontiers for each ownership (public, private and foreign banks) category has been used to evaluate the technical efficiency levels of 81 commercial banks operating in India over the period 2005 to 2013.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

I. Gusti Ayu Ketut Giantari, Ida Bagus Ketut Surya, Ni Nyoman Kerti Yasa and Ida Bagus Anom Yasa

The purpose of this paper is to find out: strengths/weaknesses, environmental opportunities/threats encountered by traditional market; traditional market business…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out: strengths/weaknesses, environmental opportunities/threats encountered by traditional market; traditional market business position; and a proper business strategy to be applied by traditional market and its implication on the marketing strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The population in this research was policy makers in Bali Province, in relation to the development and revitalization planning of traditional market, and traders doing their activity in a traditional market. The data analysis used internal and external strategic factor matrix (IE).

Findings

Key external strategic variables that pose both current and future threats are information technology, bargaining power with buyers and competitors. The key internal strategic variables which are included both present and future strengths are product quality, product variety offered, uniqueness of products offered, affordable product prices, bargaining process, strategic market location, service speed and vast parking lot. Based on the business position of the present Denpasar traditional market which is in quadrant V, while in the future it will be in quadrant II, the strategy properly applied is the proper competition strategy to be grown and built.

Research limitations/implications

The research was only conducted to traditional markets in Bali, thus it cannot be generalized to wider areas, and this research used the survey method where the data collection process was done in a certain point of time or cross-section, whilst the environment would experience extra quick changes. Therefore, it is important to do this research in the future.

Originality/value

The originality for this paper shows the comprehensively development strategies, revitalization strategies in traditional market, by using strength weakness opportunity threat and IE matrix analysis, and research location which is conducted in Bali that has different tourist condition and potentials from other regions.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 45 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Tulsi Jayakumar

To understand: – the demand and supply side challenges in launching a new product in sports. – Factors, which go into the making of a successful “new” sport. – The role of…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

To understand: – the demand and supply side challenges in launching a new product in sports. – Factors, which go into the making of a successful “new” sport. – The role of planning in sport management.

Case overview/synopsis

In July 2017, on the eve of Pro Kabaddi League (PKL) Season 5, kabaddi had emerged as one of India’s most important non-cricketing sport. PKL was India’s first men’s professional kabaddi league, introduced by Mashal Sports and Star India in 2014. Kabaddi was an indigenous sport, and India had an unbeaten international track record as world champions. Yet, the sport and its players had never received their due in India. In 2017, while kabaddi’s popularity had increased, leading to sponsorship opportunities, huge player bids, prize money and television viewership, all was not quite hunky-dory. A women’s kabaddi league introduced only the previous year had not been continued, despite an extended format in 2017. The audience profile also did not match that envisaged by Star. As a unique creator of sports content, Star was in an enviable position in India; and so was Kabaddi as a sport. How had Star created a new property around an indigenous sport with rural and rustic associations, transforming it into a snazzy, up-market sport within just three years, even while leagues involving other popular sports failed to create a mark? Could Star sustain this interest? How could kabaddi retain its “star” position within Star’s stable?

Complexity academic level

In an undergraduate or a postgraduate programme in business administration.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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