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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Bala Shanmugam, Mahendhiran Nair and R. Suganthi

Highlights the growth of money laundering in Malaysia and the efforts of the Malaysian government to curb it, including the Anti‐Money Laundering Act 2001; Malaysia was named by…

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Abstract

Highlights the growth of money laundering in Malaysia and the efforts of the Malaysian government to curb it, including the Anti‐Money Laundering Act 2001; Malaysia was named by the US Pentagon as one of the countries through which terrorist funds pass to become legitimate, and the country includes the Labuan International Offshore Financial Center, which is likely to be a target for money laundering. Outlines the Act’s provisions and the involvement of Malaysia in the Asia Pacific Group of Money Laundering since May 2000. Suggests improvements in the system: improved international cooperation, proper mechanisms for handling suspicious reports, implementing a compliance culture among financial institutions, strict application of bank‐licensing procedures, plus training and new technology investment.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2008

Aniza Zainol, Mahendhiran Nair and Jeyapalan Kasipillai

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence on the level of research and development (R&D) reporting practices by public listed companies (PLC) in Malaysia. R&D…

2242

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence on the level of research and development (R&D) reporting practices by public listed companies (PLC) in Malaysia. R&D activities initiated by a firm are an important signal for a firm's potential future value‐creation. Due to the uncertain nature of the outcomes of R&D, many companies report R&D costs as an expense. These costs are immediately written off from the balance sheet. However, this practice underestimates the intellectual capital accumulation of the firm and does not accurately capture its equity strength.

Design/methodology/approach

The PROBIT model was used to empirically evaluate the R&D reporting practices among PLCs in Malaysia. The impact of total assets, and profit before tax on the R&D reporting patterns among Malaysian PLCs were also investigated. This study was conducted on 230 PLCs from the Main Board of Bursa Malaysia (previously known as the Kuala Lumpur Stock Exchange) for the 2004 reporting year.

Findings

Empirical results showed that companies in the consumer sector have a higher probability of reporting R&D costs as an intangible asset (investment) than companies in the industrial sector. Companies with higher total assets also have a higher probability of reporting R&D costs as intangible assets.

Research limitations/implications

This study is only for a specific year (i.e. 2004) and is limited to listed companies in the Main Board of Bursa Malaysia.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made for appropriate strategies to increase the probability of industrial companies reporting R&D costs as intangible assets in their annual reports, thereby raising the future equity of the firm.

Originality/value

This study employs an innovative approach using the PROBIT model to measure the level of reporting R&D by PLCs.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Khong Kok Wei and Mahendhiran Nair

The aim of this paper is to examine the degree of how customer service management (CSM) affects perceived business performance measures (PBPM) in Malaysian banks and finance…

5052

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the degree of how customer service management (CSM) affects perceived business performance measures (PBPM) in Malaysian banks and finance companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim was achieved through an empirical study involving a survey. Of 700 questionnaires sent out, 128 were returned. The dataset from the sample underwent series of statistical analyses, i.e. reliability test, factor analyses (exploratory and confirmatory) and structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

Factor analyses extracted two dimensions, i.e. CSM and perceived business performance. All related indicators manifested their constructs respectively. Although there were expectations where CSM would diverged into more dimensions via exploratory factor analysis (i.e. market research, customer assessment, customer satisfaction and customer relationship management), the results show that CSM were encapsulated as a single construct by respondents. The findings confirmed that CSM had significant association on PBPM, i.e. 0.83 standardised regression weights.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation was the size of the sample. Although the permissible threshold of sample size was met, the research would not be jeopardized with larger sample size. Future research can entail foreign banks so that the results can be compared in contrast with the ones gathered in this paper.

Practical implications

The results can help bankers enhance their competitiveness with more emphasis on CSM through market research, customer satisfaction, customer assessment and handling of customer. These aspects are important key drivers towards successful implementation of CSM.

Originality/value

Although CSM is multi faceted, it was viewed by the respondents as a single construct. The paper empirically justified the effectiveness of CSM on PBPM. Bankers may find this paper useful as perceptual measures can be empirically substantiated using SEM.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Santha Vaithilingam and Mahendhiran Nair

The primary objective of this paper is to examine the factors that underpin the pervasiveness of money laundering. An empirical method was used to study the relationship between…

7225

Abstract

Purpose

The primary objective of this paper is to examine the factors that underpin the pervasiveness of money laundering. An empirical method was used to study the relationship between technology (information and communication technology infrastructure), quality of human capital, efficiency of the legal framework, ethical behavior of firms (corporate governance) and capacity for innovation on the pervasiveness of money laundering in developed and developing countries. Based on the empirical findings, key strategies and policies to reduce the pervasiveness of money laundering were examined in this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample period for this study was 2004‐2005 entailing 88 developed and developing countries. The ordinary least square method was used in this paper to examine the impact of the above‐mentioned factors on the pervasiveness of money laundering.

Findings

The empirical analysis showed that efficient legal framework with good corporate governance lower the pervasiveness of money laundering activities. The empirical analysis also showed that a high‐innovative capacity contribute negatively to the pervasiveness of money laundering activities.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this study is the lack of quality data measuring pervasiveness of money laundering patterns over a longer period of time. Over the next two years, as more data becomes available, a more robust econometric modeling framework called the dynamic panel data method can be used to assess the impact of the above‐mentioned factors on the pervasiveness of money laundering. This new method will not only capture the factors contributing to variations of pervasiveness of money laundering across the different countries but also across the time period.

Practical implications

Strategies to reduce the pervasiveness of money laundering in developing countries are discussed.

Originality/value

While there are numerous studies in the literature that critically examine factors that contribute to money laundering, the number of empirical studies that examined the factors that contribute to money laundering are rather scarce. This study hopes to fill this gap in the literature.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Hung Ba and Tran Huynh

The purpose of this paper is to apply the framework Price (2008) and HSBC Money Laundering Risk Procedures 2016 for estimating the risk contribution of each individual customer in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the framework Price (2008) and HSBC Money Laundering Risk Procedures 2016 for estimating the risk contribution of each individual customer in Vietnamese banking system using the information from the survey in South East region in Vietnam in general and Ho Chi Minh city in specific.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the collected data from the survey, the Money Laundering Risk Score (MLRS) is calculated for each customer who is using the services and products of Vietnamese commercial banks by the enhanced measurement model of Christopher Price, the ordinary least squares and three variations of logistic regression model.

Findings

This paper proposes an appropriate estimation of the money laundering risk (MLR) for personal customer using the most significant factors that affects MLR and suggests practical recommendations for commercial banking system.

Practical implications

This paper suggests an intuitive method to estimate the contribution of each customer factor on their MLRS.

Originality/value

The higher respondent’s group of age lead to the higher MLR occurred in the financial market. Follow the works of Wolfsberg et al. (2006), Sathan and Mahendhiran (2007), Usman Kemal (2014) and Reganati and Oliva (2017), this paper also confirms negative relationship between MLR with the respondent’s group of salary and the academic level. This indicated that the lower amount of money the respondents earn and lower academic level they were, the higher degree of MLR.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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