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1 – 9 of 9
Article
Publication date: 2 February 2022

Alana Griffith and Mahalia Jackman

A consensus in the literature is that anti-gay prejudice has a negative impact on HIV programming for men who have sex with men (MSM). This paper aims to analyse the…

Abstract

Purpose

A consensus in the literature is that anti-gay prejudice has a negative impact on HIV programming for men who have sex with men (MSM). This paper aims to analyse the prevalence and predictors of anti-gay prejudice in Barbados, an island in the Caribbean, and possible impacts on the full recognition of the right to health care.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used nationally representative data obtained from the Caribbean Development Research Services capturing anti-gay prejudice in Barbados in 2004, 2013 and 2019. The data were analysed using logit models and ordinary least squares regression.

Findings

The share of persons who expressed feelings of hatred towards gays and lesbians did not change significantly over the period. Social distance attitudes improved between 2004 and 2013 but have not changed since. Men generally expressed more prejudice than women and male sexual prejudice could be localised to three groups – men without tertiary education, men under 51 and members of non-Christian religions. Meanwhile, there was little consistency in the predictors of women’s attitudes over the period.

Originality/value

This study provides insights into the trends in attitudes towards sexual minorities in a developing country. The main conclusion is that although health care is provided as a universal right to all Barbadians, a strictly medical approach to HIV prevention among MSM in countries with high levels of anti-gay prejudice is insufficient.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2021

Alana Griffith, Mahalia Jackman and Peter Wickham

Public support for various policy options for managing cannabis in the Caribbean and the characteristics of those most likely to support specific policy options remains…

Abstract

Purpose

Public support for various policy options for managing cannabis in the Caribbean and the characteristics of those most likely to support specific policy options remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of age, sex and employment status on the public attitudes towards the full legalisation of cannabis, partial legalisation (that is for medical or religious purposes) or its continued prohibition.

Design/methodology/approach

Using secondary data collected from nationally representative public opinion polls conducted by Caribbean Research and Development Services from 2016–2018, this paper compares the public attitudes towards cannabis in Barbados, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Lucia, Antigua and Barbuda and Dominica using a multinomial logistic model.

Findings

Support for the continued prohibition, legalisation or partial legalisation of cannabis varied significantly by age, employment status and country of residence. Women, people over 51 years of age and the employed were more likely to support full prohibition. Attitudes towards cannabis policy in the Caribbean are by no means homogenous, neither are the policy shifts occurring across the region, with some of these changes occurring slowly and not necessarily reflective of cultural dynamics.

Originality/value

This study is unique in its cross-country analysis in the Caribbean and providing valuable insight into the levels public support for cannabis legalisation. Its findings can help shape targeted public education in these countries.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Mahalia Jackman and Simon Naitram

This study analyses how the socio-demographic profile of the tourist, trip-related characteristics, distance, and economic conditions in the source country affect pleasure…

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyses how the socio-demographic profile of the tourist, trip-related characteristics, distance, and economic conditions in the source country affect pleasure tourists' length of stay behaviours in Barbados.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses “biggish” data (over 3.6 million observations), parametric models (OLS) and statistical learning models (regression trees) to develop a length of stay decision rule to segment pleasure tourists' length of stay. Our sample period is January 2004 to March 2013.

Findings

The analysis revealed a great deal of heterogeneity in the impact of the predictors across segments, which would be typically hidden from simple parametric approaches often used to model length of stay (such as OLS).

Practical implications

The main implication is that conventional models of length of stay should be complemented with segmentation analyses to shed some light on the heterogeneous length of stay behaviours of specific market segments.

Originality/value

Many studies on small tourism-specialising states focus on modelling aggregate arrivals. By modelling micro-data for Barbados, we provide insights on this aspect of tourism demand for small states. Second, very few studies use classification tools to analyse length of stay. The study contributes to the literature through its methodological approach.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Mahalia Jackman and Winston Moore

This paper investigates the potential wage impacts of a shift to more environmentally sustainable production patterns.

1158

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the potential wage impacts of a shift to more environmentally sustainable production patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis is carried out using labour force survey data and interval regressions.

Findings

Estimates at the individual level suggest that small wage differentials exist: individuals employed in green industries earn about seven per cent more than those working in non-green industries.

Originality/value

To date, very little is known about the characteristics of jobs in the green industry and by extension, the labour force effects that can emerge or change as a result of transitioning towards a greener economy. While exploratory in nature, this analysis seeks to shed light on an underdeveloped area of research, namely, wage inequalities associated with transitioning towards green growth.

Details

Journal of Economics and Development, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1859-0020

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Mahalia Jackman and Kishmar Lorde

This study investigates the magnitude and possible determinants of gaps in the (paid) working hours of male and female heads of households.

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the magnitude and possible determinants of gaps in the (paid) working hours of male and female heads of households.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilises the Bauer and Sinning’s (2008) general decomposition method to examine the differences in work hours among male and female heads of households using data from the 2014 Barbados labour force survey.

Findings

Our estimates suggest that the employment hours of female heads of households is 3.6% less than that of their male equivalents, which translates to an annual hour differential of roughly 68 to 71 employment hours.

Originality/value

To date, very little is known about the disparity in the paid work hours of male and female heads of households. This study attempts to fill this gap in the literature. Moreover, by focussing on Barbados, this paper adds to the sparse body of work on sex-based inequalities in developing countries, particularly those in the Caribbean.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Troy Lorde, Mahalia Jackman, Simon Naitram and Shane Lowe

It is generally understood that during periods of economic hardship, some persons turn to crime to compensate for income deficiencies. The paper investigates the impact of…

Abstract

Purpose

It is generally understood that during periods of economic hardship, some persons turn to crime to compensate for income deficiencies. The paper investigates the impact of economic misery on crime. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the relationship between economic conditions and economic misery.

Design/methodology/approach

An index of misery is employed that takes into account not only the rate of unemployment, but also the rate of inflation. The non-linearity of the relationship between economic misery and crime is modelled using Markov-switching (MS) models and the synchronization of their cycles is measured via the concordance index.

Findings

The paper looked at the relationship between economic misery and five types of crime: property crime, theft from motor, theft of motor, fraud and robbery. No evidence of a contemporaneous relationship between economic misery and crime was uncovered. Property and theft of motor crime respond to the state of misery with a lag of one period, supporting the criminal motivation effect. Economic misery is in the same regime as property crime 50 per cent of the time and with theft from motor crime almost 60 per cent of the time.

Originality/value

Most of the theoretical and empirical work is based on larger economies. The paper provides some insight into the relationship between economic conditions and economic misery in developing microstates, a niche which has been largely ignored in the literature. The use of MS models in the paper deviates from the tradition of examining linear relationships on the basis that the variables under investigation are inherently cyclical and linear analysis is likely to provide a weak fit under these circumstances.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Mahalia Jackman, Roland Craigwell and Winston Moore

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential link between remittances and economic volatility in small island developing states.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential link between remittances and economic volatility in small island developing states.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper estimates a panel data model using a database containing 20 small island developing states (SIDS) observed over annual intervals between 1986 and 2005.

Findings

The results suggest that, in general, remittance flows have a stabilising influence on output and investment volatility. However, given the importance of these flows to SIDS, the volatility of remittances also has a significant and positive impact on both investment and consumption volatility.

Practical implications

The policy implications of the study's findings is that SIDS (similar to how oil‐producing nations take oil price fluctuations into account when considering policy changes) may have to monitor and forecast future remittance flows and take these projections into account when making changes to either their monetary or fiscal policy stance.

Originality/value

Workers' remittances have grown dramatically worldwide, particularly in SIDS, where they constitute one of the main sources of foreign exchange. Given the importance of these flows to economic growth and development in these countries, this study examines the potential link between remittances and economic volatility.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Mahalia Jackman and Troy Lorde

Digital piracy is one of the most popular forms of intellectual property theft and is currently recognized as a crime in several countries. This begs the question, if…

2420

Abstract

Purpose

Digital piracy is one of the most popular forms of intellectual property theft and is currently recognized as a crime in several countries. This begs the question, if persons are fully informed that digital file sharing is a crime and, if caught, can be legally prosecuted, why do individuals opt to engage in such criminal behaviour? The purpose of the paper is to determine the psychological, social and economic factors influencing digital piracy. Understanding the social and psychological features of digital pirates is necessary if effected strategies are to be developed to deter the practice of digital piracy.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a representative sample drawn from the population of Barbados was surveyed. The conceptual models were estimated using ordinary least squares multiple regression, Tobit estimation and quantile regression.

Findings

The results suggest that intentions and willingness to pay (WTP) both have a significant impact on digital piracy. Intentions are in turn influenced by the pirate's attitude, perceived consequences, ethics, education level and environment. Finally, a facilitating environment and perceived importance of the piracy issue help to predict’ WTP for digital products.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, no other study has combined notions from attitude/values/behaviour with that of WTP. Yet, the literature would suggest that they both have significant impacts on the quantity of digital goods that are pirated. It is possible that not modelling their joint impact could have resulted in loss of vital information.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Roland Craigwell, Mahalia Jackman and Winston Moore

Remittances are the fastest growing source of foreign exchange earnings for developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of remittances on…

3538

Abstract

Purpose

Remittances are the fastest growing source of foreign exchange earnings for developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of remittances on economic volatility of the receiving country.

Design/methodology/approach

A panel of 95 countries over the period 1970‐2005 is employed in the analysis. To assess the impact of remittances on volatility a multivariate model is estimated using a panel fixed effects approach with cross‐section weights.

Findings

The study reports that remittances can play a key role in mitigating the effect of adverse output shocks but exert no significant influence on consumption and investment volatility. Moreover, important differential impacts exist across the various country groupings.

Practical implications

Countries that are dependent on remittances may have to monitor and forecast future remittance flows and take these projections into account when making changes to either their monetary or fiscal policy stance.

Originality/value

The findings provided in this paper should be of use to policymakers in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

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