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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Magnus Eklund and Alexandra Waluszewski

The purpose of this paper is twofold, first, to shed light on the different patterns in which international marketing and purchasing (IMP) and national innovation system…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold, first, to shed light on the different patterns in which international marketing and purchasing (IMP) and national innovation system (NIS) were embedded into the Swedish policy context, where the first approach must be regarded as a relative failure and the second a success, second, to compare their analytical lenses and policy implications through the study of a number of seminal texts of the two approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a Swedish case is selected since it provides an example of a policy context where both approaches have been considered and used as sources of inspiration for the design of policy measures. Second, the authors study a selection of the seminal texts of the two approaches in order to identify their basic theoretical assumptions. The emphasis here lies on how the schools view the importance of relations between companies, how they perceive the innovation process, their attitude towards the neoclassical market model and the explicit and implicit implications of their theoretical assumptions for policy.

Findings

IMP and its notion of the heterogeneity of resources can provide a much more context grounded analysis than is possible within the NIS/Lundvall framework. However, it requires deep contextual knowledge of individual companies, industries and national and international settings to understand the value of these resources. IMP is “tied to the ground” and radically critical of the atomistic abstractions characterising the neoclassical market view. NIS, on the other hand, requires contextual knowledge on a more superficial level and can co-exist with neoclassical economics.

Research limitations/implications

While the authors mainly focus on IMP and NIS, which date back to the 1980s, a later wave of concepts from the 1990s and onwards involve clusters (Porter, 1990), and triple helix (Etzkowitz and Leidesdorff, 1998). However, these latecomers share with NIS the ability to co-exist with neoclassical economics.

Practical implications

IMP requires high demands on any policy maker that would adopt it, in terms of acquiring deep contextual knowledge and giving up established views on how the economy works

Originality/value

The paper reveal that while both IMP and NIS like to present themselves as rebels radically departing from neoclassical economics and the linear model, NIS can still co-exist with neoclassical economics. Furthermore, IMP places high demands on any policy maker that would adopt it, in terms of acquiring deep contextual knowledge and giving up established views on how the economy works. NIS, on the other hand, requires contextual knowledge on a more superficial level.

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Magnus Eklund and Alexandra Waluszewski

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the different assessments of a particular industry and its ability to innovative, renew and prosper, but also to look into the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the different assessments of a particular industry and its ability to innovative, renew and prosper, but also to look into the underlying assumptions that are hiding behind the systemic approaches utilized in these assessments. The point of departure is an empirical puzzle: one group of studies presents a rather optimistic view of the Swedish life science industry and its ability to economize on research, policy and industrial investments. Another group of studies presents much a darker view, questioning the capacity of new companies to reach economic endurance, as well as the possibility of keeping the actually successful companies within the country. At a first sight it appears as if the two groups of studies are resting on a common theoretical ground: all seem to depart from a systemic innovation perspective that challenges the idea of an independent business landscape.

Design/methodology/approach

The difference between the assessments becomes comprehensible once the authors allow for a variety of systemic approaches in innovation thinking. The authors propose an ideal-typical distinction between two types of system perspectives; those that view technology as entangled in its environment and those that view technology as disentangled from its environment. The authors use the national innovation system (NIS) and the industrial network (IMP) approaches to exemplify the two perspectives.

Findings

An implication of the study is that the term “systemic perspective” is very broad and encompassing, something that in turn points to the importance of being clear about what the authors mean with a system, but also with what the theoretical assumptions focus on and abstract away from.

Originality/value

The ideal-typical distinction between two types of system perspectives; those that view technology as entangled in its environment and those that view technology as disentangled from its environment. The authors use the NIS and the IMP approaches to exemplify the two perspectives.

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Ivan Snehota, Antonella La Rocca and Alexandra Waluszewski

Abstract

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Alexandra Waluszewski and Ivan Snehota

Abstract

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Barbara Hanson

This chapter uses a feminist social construction argument to question the use of sex categories in biomedical research. It is argued that dichotomous sex categories…

Abstract

This chapter uses a feminist social construction argument to question the use of sex categories in biomedical research. It is argued that dichotomous sex categories reflect social pressures to categorize and create difference, gender, as much or more than physical sex characteristics in bodies. Because a dichotomous categorization scheme is overlayed on a continuous physical phenomenon contradictions appear when sexual artifacts like hormones, genitalia, sexuality, sexual activity, and reproduction are attributed with causal status either in causing/curing, increasing/decreasing risk. The implications of this argument are illustrated using a content analysis of medical writing about cancer since 1900. Implications for definition of women's health and pan-sex biomedical research are discussed.

Details

Health, Illness, and use of Care: The Impact of Social Factors
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-084-5

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