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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Fola Esan, Katie Case, Jacques Louis, Jemma Kirby, Lucinda Cheshire, Jannette Keefe and Maggie Petty

This paper aims to describe how a patient centred recovery approach was implemented in a secure learning disabilities service.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe how a patient centred recovery approach was implemented in a secure learning disabilities service.

Design/methodology/approach

There are no specific tools for measuring recovery in a secure learning disabilities service. The Recovery Star; a measure of individual recovery was adopted for use among the patients. Staff underwent training on the use of the Recovery Star tool after which a multidisciplinary steering group made some modifications to the tool. Training was cascaded to staff throughout the service and use of the Recovery Star tool was embedded in the care programme approach process.

Findings

It was found that implementing a recovery approach with the Recovery Star tool was a beneficial process for the service but that services will require a whole systems approach to implementing recovery. Key workers working with patients thought that the structure of the Recovery Star tool opened up avenues for discussing topics covered in the domains of the Recovery Star tool which may otherwise have not been discussed as fully.

Practical implications

The availability of a tool, integrated into existing service processes, e.g. care programme approach and accompanied by a systems approach, equips patients and staff for articulating and measuring the recovery journey.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the Recovery Star tool, embedded in a care programme approach process, equips patients and staff for measuring the recovery journey.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

Abstract

Details

African American Management History: Insights on Gaining a Cooperative Advantage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-659-0

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1900

The Milk and Cream Standards Committee, of which Lord WENLOCK is Chairman, have commenced to take evidence, and at the outset have been met by the difficulty which must…

Abstract

The Milk and Cream Standards Committee, of which Lord WENLOCK is Chairman, have commenced to take evidence, and at the outset have been met by the difficulty which must necessarily attach to the fixing of a legal standard for most food products. The problem, which is applicable also to other food materials, is to fix a standard for milk, cream and butter which shall be fair and just both to the producer and the consumer. The variation in the composition of these and other food products is well known to be such that, while standards may be arrived at which will make for the protection of the public against the supply of grossly‐adulterated articles, standards which shall insure the supply of articles of good quality cannot possibly be established by legal enactments. If the Committee has not yet arrived at this conclusion we can safely predict that they will be compelled to do so. A legal standard must necessarily be the lowest which can possibly be established, in order to avoid doing injustice to producers and vendors. The labours of the Committee will no doubt have a good effect in certain directions, but they cannot result in affording protection and support to the vendor of superior products as against the vendor of inferior ones and as against the vendor of products which are brought down by adulteration to the lowest legal limits. Neither the labours of this committee nor of any similar committee appointed in the future can result in the establishment of standards which will give a guarantee to the consumer that he is receiving a product which has not been tampered with and which is of high, or even of fair, quality.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Maggie S.K. Fung

The purpose of this paper is to test eight hypotheses to understand the relationship between information (Cervical Cancer Prevention (CCP) advertisements via endorser…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test eight hypotheses to understand the relationship between information (Cervical Cancer Prevention (CCP) advertisements via endorser types and advertising appeals), motivation (attitude and effectiveness towards advertisements, audiences’ reported self-health consciousness, motivation to learn more information) and behaviour intentions (accept and intent to receive CCP vaccination) using the information-motivation-behavioural skills (IMB) model.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental study was conducted using a sample of 668 young people aged 18-25 in Hong Kong. Participants were asked to respond to questions relating to self-health consciousness, motivation to learn more information, attitudes and effectiveness towards the assigned print advertisements randomly drawn from a set of eight (4 × 2 full-factorial) experimental designs and behavioural intentions.

Findings

Results revealed that celebrity endorsers had the most effective CCP ad appeal among young consumers regardless of advertising appeal in Hong Kong. The findings suggested that highly self-health conscious young people are motivated to learn more information about CCP and have a more positive attitude and effectiveness towards the CCP advertisement. Furthermore, effective advertisement predicts higher motivation and behavioural intention, whereas higher “self-health consciousness” and “motivation to learn more information” predicts more positive advertisement attitude.

Originality/value

By investigating young consumers’ attitude and effectiveness towards CCP advertisements, this paper aimed to expand the knowledge of previous studies and contribute to advertising theory by focusing on CCP aspects in Hong Kong context.

Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2005

Deborah S. Wilson

Beginning in narrative re-evaluated daily from classrooms inside prison walls, this article further explores cultural, ethical, and social values of teaching college…

Abstract

Beginning in narrative re-evaluated daily from classrooms inside prison walls, this article further explores cultural, ethical, and social values of teaching college courses inside the wall. Interrogating public discourse over what Eric Schlosser terms the “prison–industrial complex” arrogates subsequent considerations. Prison-building became a growth industry, even as prevailing political response to prisoners themselves became increasingly censorious and unforgiving. Traditional American culture preaches redemption but relishes abasement, promises forgiveness but refuses forgetting. Carefully examining further questions about humanistic discourse as a possible locus for radicalization, we finally confront how the prisoners’ situation reflects rather than deflects traditional expectations.

Details

Crime and Punishment: Perspectives from the Humanities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-245-0

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Susan Beckerleg, Ahmed Sadiq and Maggie Telfer

This paper reports on a questionnaire survey of 300 heroin users in Zanzibar town, in Tanzania. It was found that about 13% of respondents were current injectors of…

Abstract

This paper reports on a questionnaire survey of 300 heroin users in Zanzibar town, in Tanzania. It was found that about 13% of respondents were current injectors of heroin, but that 38% of respondents reported have ‘ever injected’ heroin. Many injectors reported hiding their needles and syringes and almost half of them had shared their equipment during the past four weeks. Most of the respondents reported that they had not had sexual intercourse during the past four weeks. Of those who were sexually active most reported not having used a condom the last time they had intercourse. These findings highlight the need for a wider recognition of the extent of heroin use in East Africa as well as the urgent need to provide harm reduction and treatment services.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1899

In a previous article we have called attention to the danger of eating tinned and bottled vegetables which have been coloured by the addition of salts of copper and we…

Abstract

In a previous article we have called attention to the danger of eating tinned and bottled vegetables which have been coloured by the addition of salts of copper and we have urged upon the public that no such preparations should be purchased without an adequate guarantee that they are free from copper compounds. Copper poisoning, however, is not the only danger to which consumers of preserved foods are liable. Judging from the reports of cases of irritant poisoning which appear with somewhat alarming frequency in the daily press, and from the information which we have been at pains to obtain, there can be no question that the occurrence of a large number of these cases is to be attributed to the ingestion of tinned foods which has been improperly prepared or kept. It is not to be supposed that the numerous cases of illness which have been ascribed to the use of tinned foods were all cases of metallic poisoning brought about by the action of the contents of the tins upon the metal and solder of the latter. The evidence available does not show that a majority of the cases could be put down to this cause alone; but it must be admitted that the evidence is in most instances of an unsatisfactory and inconclusive character. It has become a somewhat too common custom to put forward the view that so‐called “ptomaine” poisoning is the cause of the mischief; and this upon very insufficient evidence. While there is no doubt that the presence in tinned goods of some poisonous products of decomposition or organic change very frequently gives rise to dangerous illness, so little is known of the chemical nature and of the physiological effects of “ptomaines” that to obtain conclusive evidence is in all cases most difficult, and in many, if not in most, quite impossible. A study of the subject leads to the conclusion that both ptomaine poisoning and metallic poisoning—also of an obscure kind—have, either separately or in conjunction, produced the effects from time to time reported. In view of the many outbreaks of illness, and especially, of course, of the deaths which have been attributed to the eating of bad tinned foods it is of the utmost importance that some more stringent control than that which can be said to exist at present should be exercised over the preparation and sale of tinned goods. In Holland some two or three years ago, in consequence partly of the fact that, after eating tinned food, about seventy soldiers were attacked by severe illness at the Dutch manœuvres, the attention of the Government was drawn to the matter by Drs. VAN HAMEL ROOS and HARMENS, who advocated the use of enamel for coating tins. It appears that an enamel of special manufacture is now extensively used in Holland by the manfacturers of the better qualities of tinned food, and that the use of such enamelled tins is insisted upon for naval and military stores. This is a course which might with great advantage be followed in this country. While absolute safety may not be attainable, adequate steps should be taken to prevent the use of damaged, inferior or improper materials, to enforce cleanliness, and to ensure the adoption of some better system of canning.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 1 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Abstract

Details

Sport, Gender and Mega-Events
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-937-6

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1925

14. For the purposes of these Regulations an application may be made to any Justice having jurisdiction in the District, and thereupon subsection (2) of Section 28 of the…

Abstract

14. For the purposes of these Regulations an application may be made to any Justice having jurisdiction in the District, and thereupon subsection (2) of Section 28 of the Public Health Acts Amendment Act, 1890, whether that subsection is or is not in force in the District, and any provision in any Act of Parliament which applies to a proceeding under or consequent upon that subsection, shall have effect in relation to the proceedings, as if the application were a complaint within the meaning of the said subsection and otherwise subject to the provisions of these Regulations.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1972

SOME twenty years gone by I was inspanned into a movement to explain automation to the nation which was said to be apprehensive of its effects on full employment. In vain…

Abstract

SOME twenty years gone by I was inspanned into a movement to explain automation to the nation which was said to be apprehensive of its effects on full employment. In vain I explained that automation was industry's response to labour shortage and that unemployment was a consequence of economic not technical policies; that it was impossible to start new industries with an only marginally increasing work force, unless it could be staffed by those deployed from industries whose productivity was rising.

Details

Work Study, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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