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Article

Ulrich Riehm, Knud Böhle, Bernd Wingert, Ingrid Gabel‐Becker and Manfred Loeben

The project's approach and focus as well as some results of phase I (1986) and II (1987) are reported in Part 1. Each phase of the project combined different tasks:

Abstract

The project's approach and focus as well as some results of phase I (1986) and II (1987) are reported in Part 1. Each phase of the project combined different tasks:

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article

Maggie O'Neill

This article argues that there are two main barriers preventing imagining and actioning an inclusive, holistic strategy for prostitution reform in the UK. It identifies…

Abstract

This article argues that there are two main barriers preventing imagining and actioning an inclusive, holistic strategy for prostitution reform in the UK. It identifies five key tenets needed to improve the situations for men and women involved in selling sex. Findings from innovative research methods are used to explore how community safety may be improved.

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Safer Communities, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Abstract

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Inquiring into Academic Timescapes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-911-4

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Article

Jane Scoular, Jane Pitcher, Rosie Campbell, Phil Hubbard and Maggie O'Neill

This article considers the likely success of recent reforms of prostitution policy by reflecting on a recent Joseph Rowntree Foundation‐funded study that examined the…

Abstract

This article considers the likely success of recent reforms of prostitution policy by reflecting on a recent Joseph Rowntree Foundation‐funded study that examined the experiences of those living and working in areas of street sex work. This empirical work points to some of the dangers of policy frameworks and techniques of control that continue to situate sex work as antithetical to the cultivation of community safety.

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Safer Communities, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Book part

Jane Pitcher, Rosie Campbell, Phil Hubbard, Maggie O’Neill and Jane Scoular

Measures to tackle anti-social behaviour and nuisance to residents, particularly in urban areas, have been a major focus of UK Government policies over recent years. The…

Abstract

Measures to tackle anti-social behaviour and nuisance to residents, particularly in urban areas, have been a major focus of UK Government policies over recent years. The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 and subsequent legislation such as the Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003 introduced stricter powers, particularly through the use of anti-social behaviour orders (ASBOs), as a means of addressing problems in residential neighbourhoods. While there is clearly a need to tackle problem behaviour that impacts seriously on the quality of life of community members, evidence also suggests that behaviour previously tolerated by many is now targeted through enforcement measures, leading to increased polarisation and stigmatisation of some groups (Rowlands, 2005). At the same time, national agendas around Neighbourhood and Civic Renewal1 aim to minimise conflicts in neighbourhood renewal areas through fostering understanding and building bridges between different groups within diverse communities. There is thus some tension between the different agendas which impacts on how such issues are addressed within localities.

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Qualitative Urban Analysis: An International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1368-6

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Article

Maggie O'Carroll and Helen Millne

The gender gap in enterprise has been part of an ongoing debate on economic development for over 20 years. In an attempt to tackle this deficit Train 2000, the UK's…

Abstract

Purpose

The gender gap in enterprise has been part of an ongoing debate on economic development for over 20 years. In an attempt to tackle this deficit Train 2000, the UK's largest dedicated women's enterprise support organisation supported by its partners Liverpool City Council, Liverpool Vision, and an international panel of leading experts are developing the Women's International Centre for Economic Development (WICED). WICED will support the development of the female enterprise research base, the design and provision of female targeted business start‐up and development programmes and business incubation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the work of WICED.

Design/methodology/approach

Rigorous research was conducted in order to identify market need and opportunity for WICED in meeting the needs of would be and established women entrepreneurs. Primary and secondary sources of data have been collected utilising a combination of desk, semi‐structured interviews, focus groups and questionnaires gathering both qualitative and quantitative information to build a comprehensive picture. The research framework included; independent research review of women's enterprise; women entrepreneurs service user evaluation; study visits – UK, EU and the USA; literature review on legislation, policy, practice and academic research; academic and practitioner expert panel.

Findings

The research findings demonstrate that there is potential to transform the rates of self‐employment, business ownership and economic participation among women in Liverpool, Merseyside and the UK through the adoption of fit for purpose policies and initiatives to address existing challenges. The research data critically acknowledges that success in terms of increased levels and productivity of female entrepreneurship will not be achieved by “more of the same” in the way of encouragement, endorsement, development or support of the agenda and points to the US approach in developing new ways of harnessing this untapped economic opportunity.

Research limitations/implications

The research process highlighted that despite women being one the fastest growing populations of entrepreneurs they remain vastly understudied and that there was a clear lack of cumulative knowledge to adequately build explanatory theories. This lack of a comprehensive picture within the existing body of research limits WICED's understanding of the support needs of female entrepreneurs. However, it also provides WICED with an opportunity to act and conduit between researchers, female entrepreneurs and business support advice, training and incubation practitioners to begin to address the research deficit.

Practical implications

The evidence base indicates that both the design and implementation of business support services need to take account of gender. It is acknowledged that policy initiatives that do not recognise that specific requirements of aspiring and developing female entrepreneurs will have limited impact on the level of start‐up business or their growth trajectories. The WICED model reflects a transformation approach where a gender aware framework is proposed to support more nuanced research in the field, business support and business incubation.

Originality/value

The proposed WICED framework represents a departure from traditional transactional offerings as it will provide demand‐led gendered entrepreneurial services as opposed to policy and service provider supply based models.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Book part

Joanne Martin

Cultural portraits usually begin with a description of the context, but as this material is covered elsewhere in this volume, this introduction will be mercifully brief…

Abstract

Cultural portraits usually begin with a description of the context, but as this material is covered elsewhere in this volume, this introduction will be mercifully brief. At any time during the last four decades, there have been dozens, perhaps even hundreds, of Stanford University faculty and doctoral students interested in studying organizations. They have been scattered across the campus, often in small groups within larger schools and departments. They have been based in the Sociology Department and the Organizational Behavior and Strategy areas at the Graduate School of Business. There were always a handful at the Education and Engineering schools, as well as a scattering of individuals doing related work in Psychology, Political Science, and Anthropology. In spite of their numbers, before the Stanford Center for Organizational Research (SCOR) was founded in 1972, many of these faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and doctoral students felt rather isolated. They had little contact with colleagues across campus who shared their interest in organizations and little collective clout when resources were being distributed.

Details

Stanford's Organization Theory Renaissance, 1970–2000
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-930-5

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Book part

Helena Oikarinen-Jabai

Purpose – This chapter discusses the belonging of second-generation Finnish Somalis based on a participatory performative research project conducted in Helsinki with young…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter discusses the belonging of second-generation Finnish Somalis based on a participatory performative research project conducted in Helsinki with young second-generation immigrants.

Methodology/approach – The project involved organizing workshops with teams of art and media professionals and, together with the co-researching participants, staging productions, such as photo and video exhibitions and producing books and documentaries; these artworks, in turn, formed an important part of the research reporting. In these productions, the search for multiple homes and belonging formed a narrative that was expressed in both the audio-visual materials and the written stories.

Findings – The performative approaches and audio-visual methods employed in the study assisted the participants in dealing with questions of belonging and othering by emphasizing the strength and multifacetedness offered by outsider positions. In the ‘potential spaces’ created in the project setting, memories and experiences could be expressed in symbolic form, discussed and rearticulated. This, in turn, made possible the negotiation of a form of cultural citizenship that combined different homes, nations and senses of belonging.

Social implications – By claiming a cultural citizenship in their productions, the young participants were able to create multiple narrations for themselves and Finnishness, which also supported their resilience. By creating works of art with the young people, we other participants were able to observe our own participation and research from a critical perspective.

Originality/value of the chapter – The chapter demonstrates how varied perspectives and different epistemological understandings can be recognized and shared with an audience in a performative research setting.

Details

Contested Belonging: Spaces, Practices, Biographies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-206-2

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Abstract

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Inquiring into Academic Timescapes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-911-4

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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