Search results

1 – 10 of 122
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Maggie Jones

Digital preservation has been regarded as a matter of increasingly urgent priority in the UK for a number of years. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) and the…

Abstract

Digital preservation has been regarded as a matter of increasingly urgent priority in the UK for a number of years. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) and the British Library hosted a Workshop at the University of Warwick in 1995 to determine what needed to be done to develop an agenda for the UK. Since then, there has been a great deal of effort and progress, coupled with a growing imperative to move beyond theoretical research and into practical digital preservation programmes. The Digital Preservation Coalition, launched in February 2002, aims to leverage maximum benefit from the activities being undertaken individually and co‐operatively by member institutions, and to provide a catalyst for further action.

Details

VINE, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Mark Smith and Ros Burnett

The purpose of this paper is to explore the origins of the Jimmy Savile Scandal in which the former BBC entertainer was accused of a series of sexual offences after his…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the origins of the Jimmy Savile Scandal in which the former BBC entertainer was accused of a series of sexual offences after his death in 2011. The case has had a massive impact on UK policing and criminal justice policy and on care work, with implications for due process and public expenditure in responding to reports of sexual abuse.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on an Economic and Social Research Council funded project to collate data on the Savile case. It is based, primarily, on interview material from former pupils and staff members from Duncroft School, from whence initial allegations against Savile emanate, contrasting these with media accounts.

Findings

The research provides a very different picture of Duncroft and the contemporary policy context to that presented in media accounts. A questioning account of the origins of the scandal emerges. The findings may lend themselves to a moral panics analysis but also point to the power of dominant stories in influencing public policy.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on only a very small sample of interviews. The material is ethically sensitive in that it may be claimed or used to cast doubt on accounts of abuse.

Social implications

The implications of the wider project from which it draws are potentially profound, casting doubt on the origins and detail of the Savile scandal.

Originality/value

The paper addresses one of the major socio-cultural episodes in recent British history, which has had a profound effect on the workings of the criminal justice system, signalling a shift away from a presumption of innocence. It also offers insight into the cultural context of care work and the possibility, especially for males, of being subject to allegations made against them.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 38 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1926

At a meeting of the Barnstaple Rotary Club on November 5th, Mr. Percy Penhale, Borough Veterinary Inspector, read a paper upon bovine tuberculosis. Mr. Penhale said he…

Abstract

At a meeting of the Barnstaple Rotary Club on November 5th, Mr. Percy Penhale, Borough Veterinary Inspector, read a paper upon bovine tuberculosis. Mr. Penhale said he wished to speak with particular regard to a pure milk supply, which was a vital topic to them all. With consumption so rife as it was among human beings, veterinary surgeons marvelled that “the powers that be” apparently continued to regard the present state of affairs with apathy, and it was high time sweeping measures were adopted. There were various methods of infection, but cohabitation and inhalation were by far the most frequent, and almost always in a cow shippen or other confined space where tubercle bacilli had been voided from the bodies of previous subjects of the disease. In the early stages there were no appreciable symptoms, and the general condition of the animal might afford no information. Following a technical description of the disease, Mr. Penhale passed to its importance on the health of the general public. It did not stretch one's imagination far to see that the dairy herd was likely to be far more affected with tuberculosis than other cattle, as these were more often confined together in buildings. It was estimated by many eminent authorities that at least 33 per cent. of the dairy herd to‐day were tuberculous. In support of that he would say that in 56 herds tested around the Birmingham district 37 per cent. were found to be affected. It then became necessary to show that bovine tuberculosis was transmissible to mankind. This had been completely proved over and over again, but to what degree the general public was in total ignorance. In 1912 Mitchell, working in Edinburgh, discovered that 90 per cent. of cases of tuberculosis in the human being were bovine in origin. Those figures raised considerable criticism in the medical profession, but some time later Beng, working in the same city, confirmed Mitchell's experiences. It might, therefore, be taken as a fact that bovine infection was responsible for the majority of cases of tuberculosis in the human being. And bovine infection was but another name for milk infection. In the early days of life, when resistance to the disease was at its lowest, and cows' milk was the staple article of diet, the child was brought into contact with the constantly‐recurring possibilities of infection. To analyse the methods suggested for our protection, Pasteurization and boiling of milk had been the reiterated cry of many, and it was true that milk heated to 85 degrees centigrade (or 185 degrees Fahrenheit) would destroy all the tubercle bacilli or spores that the milk contained. But scientists were about equally divided. One half said that Pasteurization or boiling destroyed some of the necessary vitamines and salts that raw milk should contain. In any case, such methods should be unnecessary, and to his mind it was merely condoning an evil. Then microscopical examination of milk was very uncertain, and was not the safeguard so many would have them believe. Where could they look for the salvation? He unhesitatingly replied to the tuberculin test—the safest and surest test they were ever likely to know. He would have it applied to every milk‐bearing cow. In his view the milk of re actors should be forthwith condemned, or Pasteurized and used for calves.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Gerald Dunning and Tony Elliott

Abstract

Details

Making Sense of Problems in Primary Headship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-904-6

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Stuart Hannabuss

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2017

Otávio Bartalotti and Quentin Brummet

Regression discontinuity designs have become popular in empirical studies due to their attractive properties for estimating causal effects under transparent assumptions…

Abstract

Regression discontinuity designs have become popular in empirical studies due to their attractive properties for estimating causal effects under transparent assumptions. Nonetheless, most popular procedures assume i.i.d. data, which is unreasonable in many common applications. To fill this gap, we derive the properties of traditional local polynomial estimators in a fixed- G setting that allows for cluster dependence in the error term. Simulation results demonstrate that accounting for clustering in the data while selecting bandwidths may lead to lower MSE while maintaining proper coverage. We then apply our cluster-robust procedure to an application examining the impact of Low-Income Housing Tax Credits on neighborhood characteristics and low-income housing supply.

Details

Regression Discontinuity Designs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-390-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

MILDA MALAKUNAS, TERRY HANSTOCK, SHEILA CORRALL, ALLAN BUNCH, EDWIN FLEMING and WILFRED ASHWORTH

Small micros, big programs The increasing power of micros has meant that programs once thought the province of big science only are now edging toward the grasp of the…

Abstract

Small micros, big programs The increasing power of micros has meant that programs once thought the province of big science only are now edging toward the grasp of the humble one man bander. This could create a healthy egalitarianism in the library/information world where the large and small don't know one another. For too long real computer power has been for big libraries, either for automation projects of routines or for sophisticated information retrieval in large technical information units.

Details

New Library World, vol. 86 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

1 – 10 of 122