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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2024

Madelon McCall, Kenley Ritter and Abigail Gardner

The purpose of this qualitative instrumental case study was to determine the perceptions of preservice teachers (PSTs) on the effectiveness of instructional rounds as a clinical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this qualitative instrumental case study was to determine the perceptions of preservice teachers (PSTs) on the effectiveness of instructional rounds as a clinical experience in promoting awareness of student diversity and supporting the acquisition of professional knowledge (Essential 2).

Design/methodology/approach

The instructional rounds were implemented in a junior-level general pedagogy course prior to formal clinical experiences. Professional development school (PDS) personnel supported the course instructors by scheduling the classroom observations, supervising groups of PSTs and debriefing the PSTs after each observation (Essentials 4 and 8). The data were collected through an end-of-course survey of 18 secondary PSTs.

Findings

There were several themes that emerged from the analysis of data. First, the study revealed that PSTs credited the variety of campuses visited as supporting their awareness of student diversity and varied instructional strategies. Second, PSTs acknowledged that the instructional rounds supported their connection of theory to practice. Finally, over 70% of the participants noted that they most enjoyed in-person experiences in different classrooms to observe students and teachers in action.

Research limitations/implications

The findings for this study were specific to the teacher preparation program (TPP) utilized for the research. Each TPP requires different coursework and clinical experiences; therefore, the inclusion of instructional rounds may not be possible in all programs. Yet, the implementation of the rounds as a PST experience prior to clinical experiences is a strategy to consider to support the preparation of PSTs for their clinical experiences.

Originality/value

This study supports the continuation of instructional rounds at the teacher preparation program where the research was conducted. This research also informs other TPPs that strive to provide early clinical experiences that support PSTs’ emerging perceptions of student diversity and applications of instructional knowledge.

Details

School-University Partnerships, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-7125

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2024

Heather Bailie Schock, Yvonne Franco and Madelon McCall

Most teacher preparation programs (TPP) provide little instruction on mitigating the stress-related consequences of teaching (Miller and Flint-Stipp, 2019). This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Most teacher preparation programs (TPP) provide little instruction on mitigating the stress-related consequences of teaching (Miller and Flint-Stipp, 2019). This study aims to provide empirical support for including a self-care unit in teacher preparation curricula to address the secondary trauma and stressors inherent to the teaching profession (Essential 2; NAPDS, 2021; Sutcher et al., 2019).

Design/methodology/approach

This investigation occurred in an elementary TPP at a private southeastern US university and spanned two years, utilizing a mixed methods approach.

Findings

Findings suggest that after experiencing a 5-week self-care unit, preservice teachers exhibited a statistically significant increase in well-being and a newfound recognition of the need to prioritize self-care for effective teaching, suggesting its potential effectiveness in reducing burnout and attrition.

Research limitations/implications

While this study provided valuable insights into the implementation and impact of a self-care unit within the context of elementary education majors at a mid-sized private university in the USA, it is essential to acknowledge its limitations. One notable limitation is the relatively homogenous sample, primarily consisting of White female participants.

Practical implications

The implications of this study are critical for teacher education policy and practice, advocating for including self-care curricula to enhance teacher well-being and, by extension, prepare teachers with a skillset to support their career trajectory (Essential 3; NAPDS, 2021).

Originality/value

This recommendation underscores the collaborative efforts between TPPs and partnership schools to implement such initiatives effectively, representing a pivotal step toward better-preparing teachers to manage the demands of their profession while prioritizing their mental health (Essentials 4 & 5; NAPDS, 2021).

Details

School-University Partnerships, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-7125

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2023

Jess Smith, Ryann N. Shelton, Nate Scholten and Madelon McCall

The purpose of this single case study is to examine secondary-certificate-seeking preservice teachers' (PST) perceptions of their teaching practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this single case study is to examine secondary-certificate-seeking preservice teachers' (PST) perceptions of their teaching practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This single case study used student responses to a two-part reflection assignment to examine what it revealed about PST self-efficacy.

Findings

The findings revealed: (1) PSTs were generally more confident when reflecting in a second reflection assignment, (2) there were points of tension between confidence and unease, (3) there were instances of PSTs with mixed confidence and (4) some PSTs crafted plans for their future teaching. The authors further discuss these findings by exploring how PSTs reflected on their teaching experiences, and the authors reflected on the role of teacher educators in modeling this reflective practice for PSTs.

Originality/value

This study has important implications for teacher preparation programs and teacher educators, particularly those who work with PSTs in clinical experiences.

Details

School-University Partnerships, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-7125

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2023

Katrina Hall, David Hoppey and Megan Lynch

153

Abstract

Details

School-University Partnerships, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-7125

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